Blue Yellow Pages (Complete List)

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SELECT LastName, FirstName, HousesAndDetails, YearFrom, YearTo, DisplayYears, Description, LinkAddress1, LinkDescription1, LinkTitle1, LinkAddress2, LinkDescription2, LinkTitle2, LinkAddress3, LinkDescription3, LinkTitle3, LinkAddress4, LinkDescription4, LinkTitle4, LinkAddress5, LinkDescription5, LinkTitle5, LinkAddress6, LinkDescription6, LinkTitle6, LinkAddress7, LinkDescription7, LinkTitle7, LinkAddress8, LinkDescription8, LinkTitle8, LinkAddress9, LinkDescription9, LinkTitle9, LinkAddress10, LinkDescription10, LinkTitle10, SectionSecondary, Id, WhereAreTheyNow FROM OBInfo Where LastName<>'' order by LastName, FirstName
BLUNDELL nee Paulin, Clare 1978–1984 (5's)

Where are they now: I married in 2000 and became Clare BLUNDELL, I live in Kent with my husband, dog, cat and chickens and I am a qualified lawyer currently working for Kent County Council.

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ABAS-ROSS, Pamela 1936–1943 (1's)

Actress, author, owner of arts PR firm

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ABELL, Noell (CH (left 1964/65))

Noell Abell - a lively musician who left CH in 64/65. Noell went on to study at the Royal College of Music and through his musical career worked for the Royal Opera House and many other leading musical venues.

He has sadly passed away.

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ABERNETHY, John 1813–1813 (Surgeon to CH circa 1813)

Anatomist

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Actor/Actress Old Blues in the Internet Movie Database

Old Blues listed in the Internet Movie Database

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ADAM, Neil 1972–1979 (Th A)

Educational consultant & evangelist

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ADAMS, Carol 1959–1965 (Hertford)

Obituary from Guardian Unlimited website

Carol Adams, who has died of cancer aged 58, established the country's first General Teaching Council (GTC) in 2000. As chief executive, she led it until her retirement just before Christmas. The GTC's purpose is to regulate teachers; improve standards in teaching; and provide research and evidence-based advice to government and other bodies. Carol, supported by a loyal team, developed the GTC into a mature organisation with an authoritative body of policy and research work, a comprehensive register of 500,000 qualified teachers and robust regulatory procedures.

She handled the often tough politics of the GTC with skill, humour and reserves of energy that were legendary. She happily worked long days, criss-crossing the country, championing teachers and teaching, ending the evening either playing clarinet in one of the two jazz bands to which she belonged or swimming or playing tennis. In the last 12 months of her life, she also climbed her first mountain, became a commissioner for the Commission for Racial Equality, worked for the British Council and advised on the setting up of a GTC in Georgia in the former Soviet Union.

Carol was driven by a passionate belief in every child's right to develop his or her potential. Always an egalitarian, she believed education was the key to social justice. For over 30 years, she fought without flagging, and often ferociously, to improve standards while also striving to enhance the status of teachers, most often at times when they were being blamed by politicians as the source of every social ill.

She spoke from the heart as well as the head. She was born into a close working-class family in Hackney. Aged 11, she won a scholarship to Christ's Hospital girls' school, Hertford. She read history at Warwick University in the 1960s, briefly enjoying flower power and radical politics at the University of California, Berkeley.

After teaching history and humanities for five years at inner London secondary schools, from 1979, she managed a resource centre for teachers for four years. She wrote books for students and co-authored The Gender Trap, published in three volumes, 1975-76. Aimed at schoolgirls, it explained with wit and wisdom how sexism limited female opportunities. It was published at a time when becoming an air hostess was viewed by some as the height of female ambition.

Carol also co-edited the Women in History series for Cambridge University Press, which brought the women's movement into the classroom. She captured the lives of medieval women, as well as life in a 19th-century silk factory. She was on the original editorial advisory board of the feminist publishing company, Virago.

In the 1980s, Carol became the country's first inspector for equal opportunities at the Inner London Education Authority. In a ground-breaking post, she was responsible for gender equality in over 1,000 schools. She later became assistant chief education officer in Haringey, responsible for all equality issues, working especially hard to develop the careers of black teachers.

In the 1990s, she became director of education first in Wolverhampton and then in Shropshire, showing leadership, vision and drive at a time of great change both in local authority reorganisation and in education.

As the highly respected and politically influential chief executive of the GTC, she had no qualms in criticising government policy. She argued, for instance, that while standards had to be raised, children needed to be freed from the tyranny of being taught only to pass tests.

Carol was a generous friend; funny and feisty, she loved to dance, travel, and shop. She showed not a shred of self-pity. She spent New Year's Eve in Venice, watching fireworks over the Grand Canal. Five girl friends helped carry her and her wheelchair up and over numerous bridges. Ever the optimist, she said, it was her best New Year's Eve - so far.

She was extremely proud of her children, Amy, 19, and Joe, 22. She had a warm friendship with her ex-husband, Richard Noss. She is also survived by her parents, Dorothy and Gordon Adams, and her sister, Jill.

· Carol Adams, educationist and teacher, born July 28 1948; died January 11 2007

The following correction was printed in the Guardian's Corrections and clarifications column, Monday January 22 2007
Carol Adams was the chief executive of the General Teaching Council for England, established in 2000. The earliest GTC in the UK was Scotland's, predating those in England and Wales by over 30 years, being established in 1966.

Tribute to Carol Adams, founding chief executive of the General Teaching Council for England

Mon, 15 Jan 2007
It is with great sadness that the General Teaching Council for England notifies the death of its founding chief executive, Carol Adams.

Carol was recruited to establish the GTC, which launched in September 2000, bringing into reality the long held aspiration that teaching should have its own independent professional body. During her seven years as chief executive, Carol developed the GTC from a fledgling Council to a mature organisation with an authoritative body of policy and research work, a comprehensive register of 500 000 qualified teachers and fair and robust regulatory procedures. Carol was a passionate advocate for teachers and teaching and has made access to high quality professional development for teachers a central focus of the GTC’s work. She was particularly proud of the development of the GTC Teacher Learning Academy which offers teachers professional recognition for their learning and development work in school.

Before joining the GTC, Carol was chief education officer first in Wolverhampton and then in Shropshire. She trained as a history teacher and remained a teacher first and foremost. During the 1980s she worked as an equality adviser for the Inner London Education Authority and published a series of books and articles on curriculum development and on equality in education, including The Gender Trap.
Carol continued to champion equality throughout her career. In all her work at the GTC she ensured that the Council focused on raising achievement for all pupils regardless of background. She was appointed as a Commissioner for the Commission for Racial Equality in 2006.

Carol will be remembered by colleagues and friends as an inspirational leader who was completely dedicated to the cause of high quality teaching. She believed that teaching is the most important job in society and spoke up for teachers and teaching at every opportunity.

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ADAMS, Hannah 2000–2002 (Col A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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ADAMS, John 1973–1979 (Col A)

Public health engineer and Oxfam technical adviser John Adams (CA 73-79) is the editor of Managing Water Supply and Sanitation in Emergencies (Oxfam Skills & Practice Series).

His book: Managing Water Supply and Sanitation in Emergencies

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ADAMS, Matthew 1995–2002 (La B, Mid B, Gr W)

Flying instructor

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ADAMS, Mike 1954–1961 (Ma A)

Biologist

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Adams, Roy (Unknown)

ROY ADAMS 1927 - 2011

It is an honour and a privilege to be asked to say a few words about Roy. When I think of him, I always remember his infectious grin, his quirky sense of humour and his fondness for practical jokes, so I am sure he is now smiling down on me as he watches me struggling on my crutches to give this eulogy.

Buffy and I and our infant son, Simon, first met Roy 44 years ago this summer when we came for an interview. We had seen of a General Practice vacancy in Redditch, described in the advert, as the gateway to the Cotswolds; another of Roy’s little jokes I suspect.. Although we might have had initial reservations about Redditch we liked the practice, and were charmed to be invited back for tea at Common Farm which the Adams had bought, against everybody’s advise, in 1960 as a dilapidated wreck and lovingly restored.

As we sat in the garden being looked after by Roy, Helen and their three delightful children Susan, Deborah & Carey we felt that we too would like to live on the Worcestershire /Warwickshire border so, when some days later, Roy rang to say that I was by far the best candidate that had been interviewed and offered me the job, I was pleased to accept , It was quite a long time later that Roy confessed that I had been the only applicant. However I never regretted my decision as I was able to work with, and become a friend of a very special man, who became, together with Richard Potts, our daughter Emma’s godfather. Emma is sorry that she is unable to be here today but sends her love and good wishes to all the Adams family.

Roy was born in South Africa where his father was an Anglican Priest. Three years later in 1930 the family returned to England and Roy grew up in the Midlands, firstly near Tamworth, and later in Hampton in Arden. He was sent off to Preparatory School age 8 and then went to Christ’s Hospital aged 10. I should tell you that I am indebted to a CV written by Roy and recently found by the family, for many of the details of his life. The CV contains many amusing anecdotes, mostly inappropriate for this occasion, but is certainly worth reading by the medics amongst you. Hopefully the family might have some spare copies as, and Roy would think this entirely appropriate, I knocked a glass of red wine over on my copy

Clearly Roy loved his time at school even though the war had a major influence on his life there and at his home in Warwickshire. He apparently decided to become a doctor age 12 and although he does not mention academic studies or achievements his life was full of music, he sang in the Chapel Choir and played the oboe in the renowned Christ’s Hospital marching band, acting and particularly sport. He played for both the first cricket and rugby teams and his love of sport stayed with him for the rest of his life. As many of you know he was playing table tennis to a very high standard until shortly before his admission to Canning’s Court.

In 1945 he was interviewed for a place at St Mary’s Hospital by Lord Moran, then the Dean of the Medical school. Interestingly, he was offered a scholarship not on the basis of academic achievement but because of sporting prowess. That was the way to choose medical students. Roy enjoyed St Mary’s even more than school. His life was extremely busy. He played Rugby to a very high standard. He had a fine baritone voice and took part in St. Mary’s Gilbert and Sullivan productions and enjoyed hearing Gilbert & Sullivan tunes up to his final days. He was secretary of the Music Society and organised concerts given for free by the likes of Yehudi Menuhin, Janet Baker and Benjamin Brittain. And most lunch times he played poker in order to supplement his scholarship.

I presume that he did spend some time on Medical Studies as he passed his finals in 1950. During this happy and busy period he found the time to court Helen having been introduced to her by his cousin Topsy, who with Helen was a student at the Royal Academy of Music. With Helen, who remained his true love throughout his life, Roy now set off on his career as a doctor and together they eventually established the lovely dynasty that is here today. The youngest member is Rosa, Roy’s first great granddaughter, whom he seemed pleased to meet after she was born last summer.

Initially Roy did house jobs in Chichester and London and then spent a year as Casualty Officer back at St Mary’s, where he gained a great deal of experience, which was to come in very useful when he eventually entered General Practice.

Now followed a period of his life which was less than satisfactory. He was called up for National Service. Having little experience he was put in charge of The Medical Corrective Establishment at Colchester, where the main aim of the very young prisoners was to persuade the ‘Doc’, using a variety of ruses, to admit them to the relative tranquillity of the Military Hospital. After a brief respite in 1954, when he was seconded to the Royal Navy to help deal with the East Anglian floods, he left the Army as a Captain regarding their Medical Services as medieval.

Roy now felt that the time was right to enter General Practice and after an initial Trainee post in Hertfordshire he took a temporary assistantship with Drs Potts & Chambers in Redditch. He obviously impressed his employers as he was soon offered a partnership and so began his very fulfilling life as a Principal in General Practice which was to last for nearly 30 years.

Roy was a kind caring and very competent GP and diagnostician. He was the complete Family Doctor much loved by all his patients, his colleagues and his staff and although towards the end of his career he found, as we all did, the burden of night visits tiresome, I believe that he got a great deal of satisfaction out of this role. Another advantage of working in Redditch was the Smallwood Hospital.

When I arrived in Redditch I was amazed to discover that not only did all the GPs in town talk to each other but actually enjoyed socialising with one other. Very unusual for the 50s & 60s. This was not only because they were all good chaps but, to a large part, because we all worked very closely together in the Smallwood Hospital running the Casualty Department 24 hours a day and managing the beds. Roy had a pivotal role here, not only was he a very experienced Casualty Officer who could give anaesthetics and reduce broken bones but his surgical experience meant that he had his own operating list and assisted the visiting surgeon so he was the consummate Family Doctor and one of the last of the Surgeon/GPs.

But that was not all he did medically. Not long after he arrived in town he became involved as a factory doctor at Alkaline Batteries and eventually took over control of their medical establishment. As the years passed he became an expert on the toxicology of Cadmium and Nickel the essential components of these heavy duty batteries. The problem solving of Cadmium, in particular, took him all round the world as the toxic effects on the work force became matched by effects on the environment particularly in Japan. When eventually Roy retired from General Practice in 1984 because of problems with his neck he was able to continue with his work in occupational medicine for one or two days a week until 1993. During that time he and Helen sold Common Farm and renovated the barns to create their new house using Helen’s ideas and designs.

Roy and Helen had always had a love of travel. Indeed in 1976 they took a six month sabbatical and travelled round the world with Roy doing locums in Canada and New Zealand, visiting there Peter Chambers, whom I replaced in practice when I came to Redditch. They also bought a flat in Val Andre, Brittany where many happy holidays were spent with the family. In retirement they continued to travel and Roy enjoyed a very active life.

He was often found in the Post Graduate Centre at our local hospital ‘keeping up to date’ and involved himself fully in all his hobbies many of which he shared with Helen. Both belonged to choirs and were very involved with amateur dramatics with Helen writing reviews for the Mappleborough Green village show and Roy performing. Both were very sociable and good hosts often looking after young musicians who were performing at the Bromsgrove festival. Especially memorable were the summer music camps for both adults and children, conducted by John Strickland, which they organised at Common Farm from the early sixties until the end of the nineties

I saw a great deal of Roy both before and after his retirement because of one of his hobbies and that was his love of bridge. When I came to Redditch I joined a Doctors Bridge Group consisting over the years of doctors from each practise in town. We met every Thursday evening initially in each others houses but then when our wives became unhappy about the extraordinary late nights, the raucous laughter, the cigar smoke and the empty beer cans, we moved to Redditch Golf Club. Roy was an integral part of that group which still meets regularly.

On top of all his other attributes Roy was the quintessential family man He was a very affectionate father and grandfather always enjoying activities and games especially ping pong with all generations. He was always the life and soul of all extended family gatherings.

I am sure that you all have your very special memories of Roy. Mine are of a very good friend who was always amusing and always laughing, an assiduous godfather, a caring GP, a man who lit up a room when he entered, a great raconteur who always made you feel better when you had talked to him and a man who made the most outrageous bids at bridge but usually made his contract. Everything that Roy did he did well; perhaps not skiing but that is another story.

So dear Roy A man of many talents who lived life to the full, supported by his Christian faith An archetypal English Gentleman who has left a big gap in all our lives.

REST IN PEACE

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AGUNBIADE, Ayodeji 2000–2002 (Pe A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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AITON BROWNE, Mike 1977–1984 (Th B, Col A)

Dubbing mixer

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AKENSIDE, Mark 1759–1770 (Assistant Physician)

Poet

A selection of poems

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AKINDELE, Trienke 1995–2002 (Ba B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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ALEXANDER-SINCLAIR, Ian 1958–1965 (La B, Mid A)

Commercial lawyer, formerly a partner at Mills & Reeve

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ALLAM, Roger 1964–1972 (Pe B, Th A)

Actor Link 1

Details on Internation Movie Database

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ALLAN, Ian 1980–1990 (Governor; Almoner 1980-90)

Company director

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ALLEN, Andrew 1925–1932 (Ma A)

University administrator

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ALLEN, George 1994–2001 (Pe B, La A, Gr E)

Student, King's College, London

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ALLEN, Philip 1937–1944 (La B, Governor)

AN APPRECIATION:-

First image of Phillip Allen

Phil Allen and I both left CH in July '44. We were in adjacent houses but in different forms and I doubt whether we spoke to each other at Horsham. We both joined The Old Blues RFC immediately, but saw little of each other until 1950 when, with two years' conscription under our belts in different years, we not only played together quite often but also trained at a gym near Victoria, replacing the sweat afterwards at the adjacent "Bag O' Nails".

In those days, few players had cars and 'drink-drive' legislation was a tiny cloud on the far horizon. Sessions in club bars, therefore, went on until closing time, our thirsts being reinforced by the singing of ribald songs, often to familiar rousing hymn tunes: 'It nearly broke the family's heart when Lady Jane became a tart' to John Bacchus Dykes' mellifluous 'Melita' (Eternal Father Strong to Save), 'Life Presents a Gloomy Picture' to 'Austria' (the only one of Haydn's melodies that most of us knew), 'Father's Pants do now Fit Willy' to the immortal 'Cum Rhondda,' and so on.

Today's club bar closing time of 7.30 (pm) was unheard of and we all got to know each other very quickly in consequence.

Second image of Phillip Allen

At this time, the Old Blues had an impressive fixture list including many current First Division clubs such as Bath (on Boxing Day), Bedford, Coventry, Gloucester, Leicester, Saracens and Wasps. Once in a while, we actually beat some of them too (ah, memories) and all the effort put into training somehow seemed worthwhile.

For five or ten years, Phil was first choice as 1st XV scrumhalf. It was a difficult time; the pre-war stars, George Ross Goobey, Ronnie Jones, George Shrimpton and John Garrard had all called it a day and their replacements had to learn by hard experience. We reached a nadir in 1951 at Gloucester when, with hooker Ashby off the field injured (no replacements in those days), our line was crossed ten times in the second half. We gained revenge four years later, the happiest day of my life. But by then Phil was captain if the A XV. He continued playing for more than a decade, playing in any position where we were short to help out.

Third image of Phillip Allen

Meanwhile, the Old Blues Girl's Hockey Club had been re-started, using a pitch at Fairlop. Not surprisingly, several romantic liaisons occurred which were augmented by the Old Blues Operatic Society, originally formed as an excuse for summer drinking. Among there activities was that between Phil and Margery Hutson (Wds I & VI, '43-50). They married in 1956, and of their four sportif sons, David and Chris went to CH. With their brothers Peter and Mark, they played with the Old Blues whenever they could for long periods, mostly in the 1st XV. While still in his early twenties, Peter very unselfishly captained the A XV, although, he was a strong candidate for a place in the 1st.

Having, as the saying goes, 'hung up his boots,' Phil then switched to the role of spectator. For over two decades he followed the 1st XV week after week with only rare exceptions. This was demanding enough at 50 especially when travelling from West Wickham, Kent. But after retirement to Uplyme, Dorset, he continued to do so well into his 70's, despite becoming diabetic and notwithstanding the serious deterioration of the rail services.

His sudden death at 73 may have been triggered off by such problems. Returning from a Sunday match, he was several hours late in arriving at Axminster. Tired and hungry, he slipped and fell while preparing his car for the last leg of the journey, and fractured his skull, bleeding internally from one ear. He was rushed to hospital but picked up meningitis a day or two later and died on the Friday.

Fourth image of Phillip Allen

The parish church was full to overflowing for Phil's memorial service, with local friends supported by a strong contingent of Old Blues of all ages, many of whom must have taken two days off work to be present. David and Chris described how their father was just as unpredictably amusing at home as we all knew him to be on the pitch and, thereafter, in the bar. Following a lusty rendering of 'Cwm Rhondda' - to the original wording this time, albeit English rather than Welsh - the whole congregation retired to the nearby Hunter's Lodge for a consoling pint of draught Bass prior to the rain-soaked journey home. Although not driving, I felt quite exhausted on re-arrival at Blackheath. But it had been an event to remember.
by Tony Gayfer, Ba A 1937-44

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ALLEN, Professor William Sidney 1929–1937 (Pe B, Almoner c1970)

Died on 22 April 2004 aged 86.

Philologist

His voice Vox Graeca

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ALLWOOD, Tom 1991–1998 (Ma B, Ma A)

Freelance photographer

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ALTMAN, Sarah 1994–2001 (LH A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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Alumni: Big Grecian website for 2002 leavers

Link to Big Grecian, the website for the 2002 leavers

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Alumni: Grecians 2001, online yearbook for 2001 leavers

Grecians 2001 - the online yearbook for those who left CH in that year

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ALVES, Colin 1939–1949 (Col B)

Secretary, Church of England Board of Education

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ANDREWS, Sir (William) Linton 1898–1902 (Wd 6, Pe B)

Edmund Blunden (CA 09-15, Senior Grecian) wasn't the only Old Blue to write a memorable account of the First World War. William Linton Andrews (6's, PB 1898-1902) spent most of it as an NCO in the Black Watch, training as an officer only in 1918. He took part in the battles of Neuve Chapelle, Festubert, Loos, the Somme and Third Ypres and survived them all to write Haunting Years: The Commentaries of a War Territorial (1930), now reissued by the Naval and Military Press at £11.95.

Andrews was a journalist (in 1914 he was news editor of the Dundee Advertiser, which is how he came to join a Scottish regiment, and in later life he edited the Leeds Mercury and the Yorkshire Post and chaired the Press Council) and his vivid pen and eye for detail are put to good use in this account of 'the simple truth as seen by one who was not a militarist, not much of a soldier, and hated war.'

He quite often refers to CH. Sleeping in a squalid drill hall on his first night in the army he recalls crying under the bedclothes on his first night at Newgate Street. The camaraderie of the recruits is 'just like school again, with intense friendships, an instant breaking into talk and fun when lessons were over - endless arguments about the future, and about all that agitated the mind of youth in those days'. Leaping a ditch under enemy fire, he jumps high, tucks his legs under him and then thrusts them forward 'just as though I were jumping for Peele B house'. He misses a chance of promotion to sergeant by giving an obsolete command to a platoon he's drilling, a command picked up from the old Crimean sergeant who superintended PT at CH. On a nocturnal 'listening' mission, twenty yards from the German firing trench, he bitterly regrets that he didn't learn German at school. 'What was the good of my Greek and Latin?' But 'living up to the ideals we had been taught at school' was one of the things that kept up the soldiers' spirits, and he pities a man who lacked a 'school sense of honour to keep him going.' When the war ends he meets the press baron Lord Northcliffe 'and when I told him I was a Christ's Hospital boy he said he had never known a boy from that school fail to do well.'

Editor, Leeds Mercury and Yorkshire Post

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ANGEL MONKEY (OB, left 2004)

Information

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Angell, John 1928–1937 (Unknown)

Lieutenant-Commander John Angell, who has died aged 92, won a DSC for his service as a submariner during the Second World War.

Angell was under training in the cruiser Southampton when the war broke out, and on courses at Portsmouth when the BEF was being driven towards Dunkirk. Like many of his contemporaries, he was sent to take charge of a small boat and help evacuate the beaches.

Two months later he was appointed to the battlecruiser Hood and witnessed the bombardment of the French fleet at Mers-el-Kebir in July 1940.

Angell had, however, volunteered for “the trade” (the submarine service), and within a year was the junior hand in the T-class submarine Trident on operations off Norway.

In September 1941 he became liaison officer in the Polish submarine Sokol, which, while on patrol in the Mediterranean, penetrated Navarino Bay and torpedoed the Italian destroyer Aviere. Returning to the same place two weeks later, Sokol torpedoed the 2000-ton Italian tanker Berbera. Angell met General Sikorsky when he came on board to decorate Sokol’s commander Boris Karnicki with the Virtuti Militari.

Aged 23 Angell passed his “perisher”, the demanding course for all potential submarine captains, and for three months he commanded the training submarine H34.

In August 1943 he was given command of Sea Rover, in which he made his reputation in the Far East. As the Allies drove the Japanese back to their home islands, large targets were becoming increasingly hard to find, and Angell scored most of his successes by gunfire. He would stalk his prey underwater until he was within range; then he would suddenly surface and fire off several rounds at close range from a 3-inch gun.

In this way, in March 1944 he sank the Japanese Matsu Maru No 1 in the Strait of Malacca; in all he sank nine Japanese vessels and damaged two more off the coast of Malaya and Sumatra, frequently entering shallow waters to do so. His last victim was a small ship off Java that December. He was awarded a DSC .

Peter John Angell (he always used his middle name) was born on October 7 1919, the son of Lieutenant-Colonel John Angell, DSO, MC. His parents divorced when he was very young and he was brought up by his mother. After attending Christ’s Hospital he joined the Royal Navy as a Special Entry cadet in 1937.

Post-war, Angell accepted the surrender of German U-boats at Londonderry, and served in the carrier Eagle during the Suez Crisis of 1956. But his spell in a desk job in the equipment procurement division of the Admiralty bored him, and in 1959 he took his “Golden Bowler”.

Angell embarked on a second career, as a farmer in East Sussex, and enjoyed turning out for the Blackboys village cricket team. Then, in 1965, he took up the appointment of forest superintendent and clerk to the board of conservators of Ashdown Forest. His chairman summed up his 16 years’ service with the words: “If it had not been for him, there would be no Ashdown Forest Management Plan, no Ashdown Forest Centre and no Appeal raising almost £1 million.” Angell’s endeavours were recognised by his appointment as MBE.

The Angell family have been connected with the Clothworkers’ Company in the City of London since the early 18th century, and in 1984 Angell became the seventh of his name to be elected Master since 1768. He was also for several years chairman of the Samuel Pepys Club (Pepys having also been a Master of the Clothworkers ).

Latterly Angell had lived at Little Cheverell in Wiltshire.

He was twice married, to Kathleen Biggs and to Edwina Thompson: both his wives predeceased him, and he is survived by a daughter of his first marriage and two stepdaughters of his second.

Lt-Cdr John Angell, born October 7 1919, died February 18 2012

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ANNETT, Bill 1924–1929 (Ma B)

Public relations consultant, died on 9 November 2004 aged 92, having never retired.

After war service in North Africa and Italy as a Captain in the Royal Artillery, he rose to be Managing Director of Rank Advertising Films Limited from 1954 to 1964. Striking out on his own in his fifties, he ran an organic food business called Faunus before setting up his own PR company, AMA (Ask Me Another) Services.

In 1978 he was asked to give temporary support to the chairman of the Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments (FRAME) in resolving staff problems. This 'temporary' role evolved into a new career and Annett's vast experience and remarkable gifts served FRAME and the 'Three Rs' (reduction, refinement, replacement) approach to animal experimentation in a host of ways over 26 years. He organised the All Party Parliamentary FRAME Group, which played a key role in the passage of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. As a fundraiser he staged a succession of memorable events, and under his leadership the 1989 FRAME Appeal raised more than ?1 million.

In the 1998 New Year Honours he was appointed OBE 'for services to animal welfare, especially FRAME'.

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Anniversary (450th) of CH. Report from Sussex press

450th anniversary of CH. Written up in the Sussex press, 2002

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ANNOH, Moses 1999–2001 (Pe A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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ANNOUS, Habib 1974–1981 (Pe B)

Old Blues News December 2001: Habib Annous (Pe B 74-81) was appointed in April to manage Merrill Lynch's £110 million Recovery unit trust. He was previously in charge of their £60 million UK Smaller Companies unit trust.

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ANSELL, Christopher 1995–2002 (Th B, Pe A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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ANTHONY, Abimbola 2000–2002 (Pe A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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APEDAILE, Ernest Gordon Stackhouse 1920–1927 (Ma B)

Died on 4 March aged 93. He went from CH to Exeter College, Oxford, where he read Greats and was President of the Junior Common Room and Captain of Boats. His continuing interest in rowing was shown by membership of the Leander Club. He served for many years in the Indian Civil Service, holding charge of three districts. During the war in Burma he was Senior Civil Affairs Officer in the Army, with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel; in 1946 he was appointed OBE (Military). He was for some time the Official Head of the Department of Transport and Communications. After returning to the UK he was Secretary of the Association of British Chambers of Commerce 1972-82. His wife Daw Than Kyi predeceased him; he was survived by two daughters.

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APPLETON, Rev Richard (CH (1858-1867), Governor, President CH Club (1896-7))

The renowned statistician Sir Arthur Bowley (CH 1879-88, Governor) left detailed notes on his schooldays, which his daughter Agatha used when writing A Memoir of Professor Sir Arthur Bowley (1869-1957) and his Family. Published in 1972, the book has not been noticed by The Blue until now. CH in Bowley's time is described as 'primarily middle class and professional'. He wrote that going to Hertford was 'a terrifying and probably injurious experience for a child of nine years old' and Newgate Street offered 'sufficient teasing and minor unkindnesses to make life rather terrifying to the timid or thin-skinned, and some ignorant cruelty against anyone with natural peculiarities.' But boys 'were allowed a good deal of liberty to be out of the premises and their costume was known and respected throughout the City of London.' An academic high-flyer, he also enjoyed the boating club and wrote warmly of his fellow Grecians and many staff including James Barnard, Master of the RMS. On Speech Day the Grecians, holding white kid gloves, would take up a collection for their imminent expenses at university; this was called 'glove money' and Bowley's share in 1888 was fifteen pounds, ten shillings. He received an extra £10 to re-clothe himself when he handed back his uniform, and subsequently more than £300, mainly in the form of an Exhibition. At Cambridge his 'extremely kind and helpful' tutor was the Rev Richard Appleton (CH 1858-67, Governor, President CH Club 1896-7). A tribute to Bowley by Graham Hutton (TB 16-20) is quoted. And there's a surprise guest star: Sir Arthur refers to a photo in The Times showing 'the school marching over London Bridge, preceded by their band, headed by a majestic Grecian tossing his baton, in 1945, en route to the Mansion House.' The majestic one was surely Paddie Drake (CA, BB, MdB 39-47), the previous Old Blue Editor.

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APPLEYARD, Hilary (OB, left 1991)

English teacher, University of Siena

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ARBER, Harold William (May possibly have been at CH circa WW1)

Mystery man

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ARDEN, Geoffrey 1941–1947 (Mid B)

Ophthalmologist

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ASGHAR-SANDYS, John 1970–1975 (Th A)

Where are they now:

Richard Asghar-Sandys (Thornton A 70-75) is a transport consultant running Coach Logistics (www.coachlogistics.com) – specialising in bespoke mass-passenger transport solutions for events, conferences and all occasions, such as the BAFTA Awards, BRIT Awards and Farnborough Air Show, Consultancy, Transport and Project Management services are supplied to other organisations, chauffeur companies, exhibitions, festivals and anything that needs managing!

Recently Richard has also taken on the management and operation of Tipi Adventure (www.tipiadventure.co.uk) arranging combined short breaks of canoeing on the river Wye and remotely located riverside Tipis.

Email richard@coachlogistics.com

Richard's postal address is Coach Logistics, Orchard Farmhouse, Mordiford, Herefordshire HR1 4EJ
Phone 01432 870253 or 07870 898905

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ASHE, Robert 1966–1970 (Th A)

United Nations official

Biography

His c.v.

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ASHMORE, Marc 1995–2002 (Th B, Mid A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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ASHWORTH, Piers 1943–1950 (Ma A, Ba A, Governor, Almoner)

Barrister

Profile

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ASTON, Katie 1995–2002 (LH A, Hertford, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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ATKINSON, Amanda 1978–1985 (7's)

Now Amanda Stubbs, lawyer

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ATKINSON, Dan 1972–1979 (La A)

The Economics Editor of The Mail on Sunday, Dan Atkinson (La A 72-79), has written a Complete Guide to the City and How the Markets Work for that paper, price (£12.99).

And in April Random House will be publishing How The City Worked by Dan Atkinson (La A 72-79), economics editor of The Mail on Sunday.

Journalist, Mail on Sunday and The Guardian

One of his Guardian columns in 2000

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ATKINSON, Harriet 2000–2002 (Ba B, Gr W)

Student, Edinburgh University

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ATKINSON, Kate 1993–2000 (Col B, Senior Grecian)

Treasury official

Member of CHA Advisory Board

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ATTENBOROUGH, Peter 1948–1957 (Ma B, Almoner)

"Belated mention for a publication we missed in 1985. Beazley and Oxford edited by Donna Kurtz (Oxford University Committee for Archaeology Monograph 10) marked the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Sir John Beazley (11's, CA 1898-1903), Professor of Classical Archaeology and the man who revolutionised the study of Greek vase painting. It records the verdict of T E Lawrence: 'Beazley is a very wonderful fellow, who has written almost the best poems that ever came out of Oxford- If it hadn't been for that accursed Greek art, he'd have been a very fine poet.' He was a close friend of the poet James Elroy Flecker, brother of H L O Flecker (Headmaster 30-55). Among those thanked for helping to compile the book or mark the centenary are Peter Attenborough (MB 48-57, Almoner), Sir John Forsdyke (CH 1895-1902), Jasper Griffin (PA 48-56) and Roy Salisbury (TB 40-46, Officer 46-86, Clerk 71-86, Governor).

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AUSTIN, Derek 1958–1966 (La A)

Organist

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AUSTIN, John 1944–1951 (Th B)

Trumpeter and music teacher

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AUSTIN JONES, Peter 1953–1969 (Horsham Staff)

Now Peter Jones, poet and publisher

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AVENELL, Lizzi 1994–2001 (Col B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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AVESTON, Huw 1993–2000 (Mid A)

Information

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AWDRY, Diana 1953–1960 (Scott, 7's)

Computer programmer/analyst. Partner in her husband's business (Thomas the Tank Engine, etc.)

Link to their website

Archived version of their website (live site down 05/05/06)

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BAGNALL, Adam 1997–2004 (La B, Pe B, Gr W)

Computer Science student, Kent University

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BAILEY, Jack 1941–1978 (Ma B)

Cricketer. Secretary, MCC

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BAILLIE, Ian Cameron 1953–1960 (CH)

Tropical agriculturalist

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BAINE, John 1968–1975 (La B)

Goldstone Ghosts is a book of football poems by Brighton and Hove Albion's in-house bard Attila the Stockbroker (Basil Baine, La B 68-75), who calls it 'the story in verse of our battle to save our club from greedy moneymen and a celebration of our recent renaissance.' It's available for £3.50 including postage and packing from PO Box 668, Portslade, East Sussex BN42 4BG. Cheques should be made payable to John Baine.

February 2001 "Attila the Stockbroker" (Basil Baine, La B 68-75) has been appointed poet-in-residence at Brighton and Hove Albion Football Club.

Performance poet -

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BAINES, Thomas R 1912–1916 (Ba A)

Zoologist in Canada

Biography

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BAKER, Augustine 1587–1590 (CH)

Benedictine mystic and author

Profile

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BAKER, Charlotte 1994–2001 (LH A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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BAKER, Derek 1943–1950 (La A, Headmaster 1979-85)

Historian

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BAKER, Simon 1983–1990 (La A)

Countertenor

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BALDWIN of BEWDLEY, Earl 1970–1974 (Viscount Corvedale, Horsham Staff)

BALDWIN - Sally (Countess Baldwin of Bewdley), died aged 59 at Sobell House, Oxford, in the early hours of Friday 22nd June, with spirit undimmed after a long and heroic fight against breast cancer. Much loved and sorely missed by Edward [Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, formerly Viscount Corvedale, Horsham Staff 70-74], Ben, James and Mark. Funeral and cremation in Oxford and interment at Wilden will both be private; a celebration concert will take place in the autumn. Donations if desired to the Hon. Treasurer of The Speedwell Trust at 26 Hamilton Road, Oxford OX2 7PZ.

Elected hereditary peer

Link to "Cambridge Catalogue" showing the "Baldwin Papers" book outline and purchase

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Ballieston Distribution Centre (Glasgow) purchase

The purchase by CH of Ballieston Distribution Centre, Glasgow

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BALSTON, William (CH circa 1770)

Papermaker

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BAMFO, Sandra 1995–2002 (Ba B, Gr W, Senior Grecian)

Law student, Reading University

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Band: Lorax - an old CH band

LORAX, a CH band of a few years back

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Band: Nately, London-based rock band

Nately, a London-based rock band involving Niall Barker (Pe B/Pe A 84-91), Will Shallcross (Mid B/Mid A 84-91) and Alex Selby-Boothroyd (Mid B/Mid A 84-91)

Nately's band homepage

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BANKES AMERY, William 1896–1899 (Wd 9)

Civil servant

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BANNER, Bronwen 1992–1997 (Ba B)

Information

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BANYARD, Rev Edmund 1932–1937 (Pe A)

Reaching for the Infinite (National Christian Education Council, £13) is a prayer anthology (based on the Revised Common Lectionary) compiled by the Rev Edmund Banyard (PA 32-37).

Nonconformist minister

Christian Education site (scroll to foot of page)

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BARBER, Ben 1996–2003 (OB, Senior Grecian)

Student, Southampton University

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BARBER, Hettie (Hertford Staff 1930s, Horsham Staff 1940s)

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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BARDSLEY, Grant 1978–1985 (Ma A)

Actor

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BARKER, William George (CH circa 1815)

Navigator

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BARKWAY, Jeremy Henry 1934–1941 (Ma B)

From an email received from Jeremy's widow, Mrs Veronica Barkway July 2006:

He was born in 1924, and yes he would have attended Christ Hospital in the thirties, leaving in the summer of 1941.

He joined the army a year later, he survived landing in France on D day with the 6th Airborne light Tank Squadron at Pegasus Bridge.

After the war he had a long career in retailing.

His retirement was spent in his beloved Lake District in the house he had been brought up in.

I hope this will prove helpful to you, I did not think of e-mailing you at the time of his death. It was nice to see Old Blues remember in such a way. Jeremy talked of his school days often.

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BARNARD, Sir John 1740–1758 (President)

A Biography of Sir John Barnard

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BARNARD, Tony 1948–1955 (Ba B)

Chancellor, Lichfield Cathedral

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BARNES, J A 1929–1936 (Mid A)

Sociologist

His book "A Pack of Lies"

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BARNES, Joshua 1656–1671 (CH)

Classical scholar and author

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BARNES, Kenneth C (Horsham Staff 1925)

Headteacher & educationalist

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BARNES, Thomas 1796–1804 (CH)

Editor of The Times

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BARNETT, Lawra 1973–1980 (Leslie-Miller, 2's)

This is a recipe from Miss Jukes' cookery class, Hertford, and is one of my daughters favourites!!

Pineapple Pudding

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz plain flour
  • 1.5oz margerine
  • 2 tablespoons pineapple juice
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • 1.5oz sugar
  • 8 fluid oz milk
  • 2 eggs
  • half a small tin pineapple chunks
  • 2oz caster sugar
  • 3 drops vinegar

Method:

  1. Melt margerine in a pan and remove from the heat. Add the flour and stir in. Add the milk gradually.
  2. Bring to the boil stirring all the time and cook for 3-4 minutes.
  3. Remove from the heat and immediately add the pineapple juice. Then add the sugar and lemon juice.
  4. Separate the eggs and whisk the yolks into the sauce. Cook again slightly.
  5. Add the pineapple, mix in and pour the mixture into a greased pudding dish.
  6. Whisk the egg whites until they are very stiff, fold in the caster sugar in four lots. Add 3 drops of vinegar.
  7. Pile the meringue onto the pudding ensuring it seals the mixture completely around the edges.
  8. Place on a baking tray near the bottom of the oven and cook until the meringue is set and golden brown in colour. The oven should be gas mark 2 or 250 f.

ENJOY!

Surveyor. Star of women's rugby

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BARNEY RUBBLE (OB, pupil in 2004)

Information

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BARR, Louise 1989–1996 (Col B)

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BARRETT, John (Music Master circa 1711)

Composer & organist

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BARROWS, Kathy 1980–1985 (7's)

Where are they now: 7's until 1985 and at Hertford until 1985. Being sought by Alex Berry (now Alex Schwieso)

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BARTER, Paul 1962–1970 (La A)

Refrigeration engineer & Scientologist

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BARTLETT, Chris 1941–1947 (Col A)

From Chris Bartlett (Col A 41-47) we hear that D J Leighton (Mid A 49-58) has written Montague Druitt: Portrait of a Contender (Hydrangea Publishing, £15), the first full-length biography of the Victorian barrister suspected of being Jack the Ripper. The Ripper website www.Casebook.org says it's well written and nicely published, an excellent overview of the known facts of Druitt's life and death. 'Leighton doesn't believe Druitt was the Ripper, but instead opts for a flavour of the Royal Conspiracy theory as his preferred explanation for the crimes.'

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BARTLETT, Nick 1945–1953 (Col A)

The novelist and copywriter Nick Bartlett (Col A 45-53) has died aged 74.

His Guardian obituary by David McKie (Col A 45-53):

Ideally, he might have spent much of his life writing for the cinema. Second only to his family, this was the great love of Nick Bartlett's life. His conversations with his friend Glyn Jones about every movie of any consequence were the wonder of all who heard them.

Nick, who has died aged 74, went to school at Christ's Hospital, West Sussex, but contracted TB, which kept him away for three years and left him physically impaired. After reading English at Christ Church, Oxford, he worked in the script department of Warwick Films, but with the company looking increasingly precarious, he gave it up to become an advertising copywriter, ultimately with the Dorlands agency. His first published novel, The Second Prize, appeared when he was 27, and another, The Beggars Are Coming to Town, soon followed.

In 1960, he married Valerie Bale, a talented amateur actor. They moved to the south-east London suburb of Mottingham, and soon became involved with what was to become, to celebrate the patronage of a famous son, the Bob Hope Theatre, Eltham. Here they, and in time their daughters, Jacky, Gerri and Katy, became engaged in every aspect of the theatre's life - from acting, writing and directing to designing sets and making props and costumes. In the late 1970s Nick published two more novels under the pseudonym Richard Wiseman: dark, brooding, psychological thrillers - wholly different in style and content from his gentler, earlier books.

Valerie died of cancer in 2000, after which Nick left London for Poole, Dorset, to be close to his two older daughters and four grandchildren, to whose entertainment and gentle instruction he devoted much of his time. Yet he never really adjusted to Valerie's death. Alongside the old humour and generosity of spirit, there was always a hint of melancholy. In April, he suffered a stroke, and after a second died peacefully in hospital. His daughters and grandchildren survive him.

Reproduced from the Guardian

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BARTLETT, Roger 1956–1964 (Mid B, Pe A)

Barrister

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BARTON, Sdn Ldr Arthur Edward Mackenzie, DFC (Max) 1933–1941 (Col B)

Born 31 January 1924, died on 11 May 2001 at his home in Aust, Bristol. His wife, Jean, wrote to say: 'He had a good party at the end of January, and was then in and out of hospital. He came home for the last nine weeks. He didn't get into any great pain and just drifted away while I was there.'

Max started his education at CH in Prep A in 1933, moving to Coleridge B in 1934, where I joined him as a new boy. Our academic abilities being similar, we both opted to specialise in Engineering when we entered the Upper Fourth. In one of his letters to me, in later years, Max wrote: 'The classics masters and house masters had little interest in me, but Teddy Edwards, Kirby and Averill, and various art masters did take an interest in me, communicated to me some of their own knowledge and enthusiasm, and by so doing gave me a sound foundation for my own life. I shall always remember them with affection.'

Due to wartime policy at the end of 1940, when we were in the GE, the school was no longer a centre for University of London Matriculation examinations, so, Max and I, who had studied the Matric. syllabus, sat the examinations elsewhere. Pleased with our success, we returned to school as EM (Engineering and Medical) Deputy Grecians, working for the University of London Inter.B.Sc.. Although our age group had not yet matriculated, the Headmaster informed us that we were not suited to higher education, and that we were to leave on our 17th birthdays, before the end of the school year.

Max served with distinction in the RAF during the war, as navigator and pilot, and continued service with the RAF until 1967, when he retired as a Staff Officer, with the rank of Squadron Leader, in Operational Requirements in Whitehall.

With a recommendation from Dr Barnes Wallis (CH 1900-04), he moved to Bristol, where, he worked on the Concorde for ten years, and then moved into the Guided Weapons Division of British Aerospace as manager, project leader, study manager and inventor. He retired in 1989.

As a member of the Royal Aeronautical Society, he was Secretary, and then Chairman, of the Bristol Branch. After serving on the Council of the Society for 12 years, he became Vice President in his last year on the Council.

When he retired, Max gave up his dangerous sport of sailing off shore, which included crossing the Atlantic single handed, and started motor racing. He also pursued his lifelong interests as poet, painter, potter and philosopher. He spent years writing theses on controversial theories in physics, especially his 4 dimensional theory of light transmission.

Max was a gentle man who was loved by all who knew him, and will be greatly missed by his wife, Jean, his daughter and his two sons, as well as his many friends. In Max's words, 'I do not have any ambition to attain great spiritual eminence, or wealth or power, only to try to be true to myself and truthful to others, to achieve the benevolence of loving kindness for its own sake.' - written by Arthur HC Williams Col B 1934-41

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BASKCOMB, A W 1890–1897 (CH)

Actor

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BASKCOMB, Lawrence 1895–1999 (CH)

Actor

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BATE, H Francis 1868–1974 (CH)

Painter

His painting "General Post Office, London"

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BATE, Terry 1945–1951 (Col A, Governor)

International radio & television executive

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BATES, Catherine 1980–1987 (1's, Col A)

Where are they now: Being sought by Juliana Matthews

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BATES, Len (Leonard Thomas Ashton) 1935–1963 (Horsham Cricket Coach)

Cricketer

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Bateson, D M 1942–1948 (Col A)

SUBMITTED BY H E G BATESON PE B/A 84-90

David Bateson was born in Skipton on 27th February 1931. His parents moved south to Woodford Green before the war where he won an LCC Scholarship to CH in 1942. He loved husbandry and spent his war years raising goats at the Science Farm in order to provide milk for master's wives and whoever else would part with a penny or two. His other love was playing games, especially Rugby Football and after school played for the Old Blues from

1950 to 1955, including the side of 1955 that beat Gloucester. A flamboyant wing with an exceptionally fast turn of pace, his Captain the late Tony Gayfer was quoted as saying 'Bateson on his day was the best wing I can recall in OB colours'. It was his dummy cross kick and subsequent try scored by him that was to secure the win at Kingsholm. Prior to this in

1950 he was commissioned into the RASC where he also played Rugby for the Army. In 1956 he moved to Australia where he joined Caltex running their Advertising and PR Department for NSW. On his return to England in 1962 he again worked in the oil business where he launched the first 'self-service'

petrol station in London. Around this time he realised that his independent spirit would prove a better asset if he became self-employed. This took him into the Antiques business where he established a successful Antique dealership in Kent. In 1982 he and the family moved to Norfolk where he returned to his love of good husbandry by running a smallholding producing what is now referred to as 'organic' produce, ranging from eggs, milk and all meats from rare breed pork to lamb. He soon became a coach for Diss RFC and he also founded Bressingham CC, which under his Captaincy saw successful seasons from 1990 to 1998, and unbeaten tours to Yorkshire and Lincolnshire.

He was a Parish Councillor and also a pioneer in the now popular art of Genealogy. Always ahead of modern trends, most notably with organic farming and later Genealogy, but he never really capitalised financially on these activities instead seeing them as simply worthwhile things to do. He is survived by his wife Patricia, his two daughters, his son and four grandchildren.

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Baugh, Chris 1947–1954 (Col B)

Where are they now FOUND: Charles Baugh (Col B 1947-1954) owns and manages an international real estate agency offering a wide range of overseas property and land. Whilst specializing in Brazil, Vila Branca Property & Leisure also covers Portugal, California, Florida, Mozambique and is planning further expansion to other locations in the near future. The company’s overseas associates were selected not only for their expertise and integrity but also for their ability to provide clients with a truly personal before and after-sales service.

A recent addition to the company’s portfolio is a competitive range of holiday accommodation and travel services.

Website: www.villabranca.com

e-Mail: c.baugh@ntlworld.com

Telephone: +44-(0)1932-701-752

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BAWCOMBE, Jonathan 1995–2002 (Pe B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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BAWTREE, David 1947–1955 (Mid A, Almoner)

Rear Admiral. Home Office Civil Emergencies Advisor

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Bax Castle, The. CH local pub

Review in the Horsham Pub Guide

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BAXTER, James 1999–2001 (Th A, Gr W)

Student, Lancaster University

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BEARDSWORTH, George Braithwaite 1916–1922 (Col B)

Air Vice-Marshal

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BEAUMONT, Ben (LH B)

Where are they now: Was in Leigh Hunt B with the boys Alex Clift, Nigel Gilbert, Milky, Simon Goodwin, etc. Being traced by Piers Barttelot (1987-1990).

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BEAVEN, Paul (Horsham Staff 1934, 1939-70)

Information

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BEAZLEY, Sir John 1898–1903 (11's, Col A)

Belated mention for a publication we missed in 1985. Beazley and Oxford edited by Donna Kurtz (Oxford University Committee for Archaeology Monograph 10) marked the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Sir John Beazley (11's, CA 1898-1903), Professor of Classical Archaeology and the man who revolutionised the study of Greek vase painting. It records the verdict of T E Lawrence: 'Beazley is a very wonderful fellow, who has written almost the best poems that ever came out of Oxford- If it hadn't been for that accursed Greek art, he'd have been a very fine poet.' He was a close friend of the poet James Elroy Flecker, brother of H L O Flecker (Headmaster 30-55). Among those thanked for helping to compile the book or mark the centenary are Peter Attenborough (MB 48-57, Almoner), Sir John Forsdyke (CH 1895-1902), Jasper Griffin (PA 48-56) and Roy Salisbury (TB 40-46, Officer 46-86, Clerk 71-86, Governor)

Greek Art by Nigel Spivey (Phaidon, £14.95) refers to Sir John Beazley (11's, CA 1898-1903) and his methods of identifying hundreds of ancient Greek artists, most famously vase-painters, whose names are unknown. He gave them such labels as 'The Elbows-Out Painter' and 'The Painter of the Woolly Satyrs'.

Classical scholar

His archive

His drawings from Athenian pottery)

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BEECHAM, Delphine 1958–1964 (Palmer, 1's & 8's)

Owner, Delphine Art

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BEESON, Lenon 1937–1944 (Th A)

Lecturer & teacher

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BELCHER, Ronald Henry 1925–1934 (La B)

Died in Autumn 2002. After leaving CH he obtained BA degrees from both Cambridge (Jesus College) and Oxford (Brasenose); from Cambridge he also acquired a Diploma in Classical Archaeology. He entered the Indian Civil Service in 1939 and served in the Punjab until 1948 when he moved to the Commonwealth Relations Office. In the early Fifties he was seconded to the Foreign Office and joined the British Embassy in Washington; otherwise he remained in the CRO until 1965, rising to be Deputy High Commissioner for the UK in South Africa (1956-59), Assistant Under Secretary of State (1960-61) and Deputy High Commissioner in Delhi (1961-65). He was appointed CMG in 1958. From 1965 to 1975 he was Under-Secretary of the Overseas Development Administration, the forerunner of today's Department of International Development. In 1980 he was one of several Old Blues who contributed to the Scolar Press book The District Officer in India, 1930-1947. His interests included music, archaeology and the theatre. He married, in 1948, Hildegarde Hellyer-Jones, who died in 2000. They had one son. Belcher left a legacy to CH.

Civil servant

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BELL, Brigadier General Ron 1943–1951 (Ba B)

The memoirs of the oceanographer Timothy Parsons (BB 42-49) will be published next spring by EcceNova Editions, entitled The Sea's Enthrall. 'A witty, at times philosophical, sometimes even poignant exposition on Life, as seen from the perspective of a man whose scientific training is wonderfully complemented by a curiosity for less empirical matters, such as poetry and religion,' the book includes a section on his CH years, complete with photos. A CH contemporary, Brigadier General Ron Bell (BB 43-51), commends Parsons as 'an independent thinker who likes to challenge conventional views, whatever the subject - a scientist who appears to have discovered there is a poetry to life which illuminates his thinking.'

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BELL, Chris 1972–1979 (?)

Where are they now: From Steve Le Butt on 21st Nov 2005 and so the stag do is probably a distant memory by now!!: I wonder if you can help, I have the dubious honour of organising a stag do for Jon Watson Miller (the second one I might add !) and I am trying to find Chris Bell ( 72-79 ) and Elliott, same year, but can't remember his first name. Do you have any details for either of them?

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BELL, Frank Owen 1918–1926 (Ba B)

Colonial administrator

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BELL, John 1980–1986 (LH B, La B, Ma A)

Working for Qualcomm in San Diego, California

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BELL, Robert Donald Murray 1926–1935 (Mid A)

Died in November 2001. He went from CH to Clare College, Cambridge, where he took a First in the Natural Sciences Tripos (Physics) in 1938. In the same year he joined the Scottish Office. He served in the Royal Artillery from 1940-45 (1943 saw him at the Military College of Science, Bury). By 1946 he was a Principal in the Scottish Home Department, from 1947-50 he was Private Secretary to the Secretary of State for Scotland and between 1959 and his retirement in 1976 he was an Under-Secretary in the Scottish Departments. Later he seems to have moved from Inveresk, just outside Edinburgh, to a house of that name in Spain.

In 1941 he married Karin Anna Smith, whom he outlived. They had a son and a daughter.

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BELLASIS, Edward 1808–1815 (CH)

Serjeant-at-law. Prominent Roman Catholic convert

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BELLINGHAM, Alan 1972–1977 (Col B)

Computer specialist

Profile

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BENJAMIN, Tim 1988–1995 (Mid B)

Composer

His web technology agency)

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BENNETT, Charles Debenham 1845–1850 (CH)

Mayor of Gisborne, New Zealand

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BERINGER, Charles 1995–2002 (Th B, ThA, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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BERRY, Martyn 1948–1957 (Mid B)

The Chemistry of Art with Anthea Peppin and Colin Osborne A resource pack exploring the close relationship between the seemingly diverse worlds of Chemistry and the Arts. Royal Society of Chemistry/National Gallery, £10

AS & A Level Chemistry with Eric Lewis A clearly structured Chemistry text ensuring successful progression from GCSE to AS and A level. Longman, £26.50

Hydrogen Technology & Fuel Cells with Averil Macdonald A 4-volume lesson book set, comprising Science through Hydrogen, Chemistry through Hydrogen, Energy through Hydrogen, Physics through Hydrogen heliocentris Energiesysteme GmbH, price unknown

Chemist

His Guardian obituary of Gordon Van Praagh, Horsham Staff 1933-63

Book - The Chemistry of Art

Book - AS & A Level Chemistry

Book - Hydrogen Technology & Fuel Cells

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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BERTIE, Sir Thomas (Hoar, CH circa 1770)

Admiral

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BIANCARDI, Lucia 2000–2002 (Ba B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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BIRAM, Benjamin (CH circa 1813)

Mining engineer

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BIRON, Joan 1929–1936 (6's)

Sister Joan Therese's funeral was on July 28th 2011.

Please click here to read the funeral address.

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BIRT, The Venerable William Raymond 1921–1929 (Mid A)

Died on 11 March 2002 aged 90. He was Archdeacon of Berkshire 1973-77 and from 1985 had the title Archdeacon Emeritus.

The son of a clergyman, Raymond Birt did not take orders himself until his mid-forties. He taught at Trent College 1929-31, was a sub-editor on The Daily Sketch 1933-34 and then spent five years at Play Rights Publications as an assistant editor. War service followed: as a Major in the 22nd Dragoons (RAC) he was responsible for wireless communications - vital in all armoured regiments - and was mentioned in despatches. In 1946 he returned to publishing as an editor with Winchester Publications, moving in 1949 to Country Life Books. He was co-author of The Queen Elizabeth, the world's greatest ship (1947) and sole author of The Glories of Winchester Cathedral (1948), The Glories of Ely Cathedral (1949) and XXII Dragoons 1760-1945: The Story of a Regiment (1950).

Trained for the priesthood at Ely Theological College, he spent his entire ministry in the diocese of Oxford. After curacies in Caversham and Newbury he was Vicar of St George's, Wash Common, Newbury, 1963-71; for part of that time he was also priest-in-charge of Enborne with Hamstead Marshall. Serving as Rural Dean of Newbury from 1970 until his appointment as Archdeacon, he moved from St George's in 1971 to spend ten years as Rector of West Woodhay. Circa 1980 he was made an Honorary Canon of Christ Church, Oxford. After retiring as Rector he spent another decade as Assistant Rector of the combined parish of West Woodhay with Enborne, Hamstead Marshall, etc. He lived latterly in Kingsclere, south of Newbury. His stated recreation was 'gardens and gardening'.

In 1936 he married Marie Louise Jeaffreson, with whom he had a son and two daughters. She died in 1990 and in 1994 he married Diana Bronwen Warren.

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BISHOP, James 1972–1978 (Mid A)

Gite proprietor, Brittany, France

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BISHOP, Julian 1977–1984 (Col B, MdB, MB)

Human resources director

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BLACKWELL, Charles 1778–1785 (CH)

Brickmaker & farmer

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BLAKEWAY-PHILLIPS, Clare 1969–1975 (4's)

Clare Blakeway-Phillips (4's 69-75) is one of four editors of Accreditation in Primary Care: Towards Clinical Governance (Radcliffe Medical Press, £18.95).

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BLAND, Rob 1961–1967 (Mid A)

Died in Holland of cancer, 30th October 2004

Nick Duffell's The Making of Them: The British Attitude to Children and the Boarding School System (Lone Arrow Press, £20) sets out the case of the 'Boarding School Survivors' movement and is edited by Rob Bland (MdA 61-67) whom the author thanks 'for years of friendly discussion of the problems of being English, for running many of the men's groups with me, and for making this book readable.' Bland is quoted occasionally in the text but with no direct comment on his CH experience except that he enjoyed many things about it, including the food!

Writer & translator.

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BLASSON, Robert Nicholls (CH 1840s)

Died at CH in 1848

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Blog: INCANDESCENS (Horsham 1980s)

Link to Blog

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Blog: KIM BAH LEE (OB, dates unknown)

Kim Bah Lee Blog website

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BLOHM, Leslie 1970–1977 (Col A)

Barrister

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BLOOMFIELD, Peter 1944–1951 (Pe B)

Christ's Hospital in the Year 2000 - The first ever full colour illustrated book about CH, tracking all aspects of life over the academic year 1999-2000. [publisher?], £25

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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BLOOR, Gordon 1974–1981 (CH)

Chief executive, Tenfore

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BLUNDEN, Edmund 1909–1915 (Col A, Senior Grecian)

Not one but two new biographies of that neglected OB Leigh Hunt (CH 1791-99): Fiery Heart: The First Life of Leigh Hunt by Nicholas Roe (Pimlico, £12.99) and The Wit in the Dungeon: The Life of Leigh Hunt by Anthony Holden (Little, Brown, £20). Roe's book chronicles Hunt's glory days as champion of liberty, journalist, editor, advocate, essayist, poet, and associate of Byron, Keats, Shelley, Hazlitt and Charles Lamb (CH 1782-89), ending in 1822 shortly after Shelley's death. Holden tells the whole story, including Hunt's long decline into obscurity (he survived until 1859). The man who, when jailed for two years for libelling the Prince Regent, not only continued to publish successfully but turned his cell into a well known left-wing literary salon (hence Holden's title) lived on and on, quarrelsome, thwarted and impoverished, to become the original of the feckless Harold Skimpole in Dickens's Bleak House. Both biographies have been well received; some critics, ignoring Ann Blainey's Immortal Boy in 1985, claimed no life of Hunt had been written since the one by Edmund Blunden (Col A 09-15, Senior Grecian) in 1930. Hunt's Selected Writings have been published in six volumes by Pickering & Chatto, price £495.

Edmund Blunden (Col A 09-15, Senior Grecian) wasn't the only Old Blue to write a memorable account of the First World War. William Linton Andrews (6's, Pe B 1898-1902) spent most of it as an NCO in the Black Watch, training as an officer only in 1918. He took part in the battles of Neuve Chapelle, Festubert, Loos, the Somme and Third Ypres and survived them all to write Haunting Years: The Commentaries of a War Territorial (1930), now reissued by the Naval and Military Press at £11.95.

Recent books by John Purkis (Mid B c. 1950): A Preface to Wilfred Owen (Longman, £14.99) - in which the names of Edmund Blunden (CA 09-15, Senior Grecian), Keith Douglas (La A, Mid B 31-38) and John Middleton Murry (3's, Ma A 01-08) crop up - and Teach Yourself Greek Civilization (Hodder & Stoughton, £8.99).

Several OBs appear in Robert Runcie: The Reluctant Archbishop by Humphrey Carpenter (Sceptre, £7.99). In wartime Oxford Runcie was in the Officers' Training Corps and was taught map-reading by Edmund Blunden (Col A 09-15, Senior Grecian) 'in a very fey kind of way; you couldn't hear what he was saying most of the time.' Back at Oxford after the war he attended Ancient History lectures by Russell Meiggs (Ma B 12-21, Senior Grecian, Horsham Staff 20s), a 'really wonderful man'. As Archbishop of Canterbury he chose as his chief of staff Ross Hook (Ba B, LB 28-36, Almoner c. 80-88) whom the present Bishop of London recalls as 'a large personality who was mis-cast as an administrative assistant.' Hook's wife Ruth did a lot of ghost-writing for Runcie. Mention is made of the book Hostage: the complete story of the Lebanon captives by Con Coughlin (Pe B 66-73).

Poet and man of letters

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BODEN, Cecil 1902–1906 (Th A)

Priest & cricketer

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BOLDER, Robert (CH 1870s)

Actor

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BOLTON, C.J. - MA (Oxon) PhD from Berkeley 1957–1965 (La A)

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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BOLTON, Rohan 1959–1968 (1's, 3's)

Rohan Bolton (1's, 3's 59-68), a former librarian in the House of Commons and in the UK office of the European Parliament, has edited the Federal Trust's Guide to the EU Institutions (?25). 'Here in one volume are all the answers to many basic questions about Europe'.

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BORGARS, Barbara 1963–1970 (5's, 2's)

I'm currently in Barcelona working as an Export Sales Exec. for an offset printing house.

Pleased to quote Old Blues for printing jobs, if only so that they can check that they are getting a good deal !

Email: bborgars@hotmail.com

Cell : +34.646.290.892

Work details:

VIKING S.A.

Cobalt , 51

08907 L'Hospitalet ( BCN)

España

Tel: +34.93.260.22.33

Fax: +34.93.260.22.35

Web: www.graficasviking.com

Cell: +34.629.42.40.99

Email: bborgars@graficasviking.com

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BORGARS, Peter 1964–1970 (Th B)

Died in 1987

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BOSTOCK, Geoff 1954–1962 (Ma A, Ba B)

Electronics engineer

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BOSTON, Jonny 1982–1989 (La A)

Singer, saxophonist, songwriter

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BOUGE, John (CH circa 1976-83)

His photo in 2003:

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BOURNE, Rachel 1977–1984 (Hertford)

Rachel Bourne (Hertford 77-84) is joint editor with A. L. G. Hayzelden of Agent Technology for Communication Infrastructures (Wiley, £55).

Lecturer in Electronic Engineering, Queen Mary & Westfield College, University of London

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BOWLEY, Sir Arthur 1879–1888 (CH, Governor)

The renowned statistician Sir Arthur Bowley (CH 1879-88, Governor) left detailed notes on his schooldays, which his daughter Agatha used when writing A Memoir of Professor Sir Arthur Bowley (1869-1957) and his Family. Published in 1972, the book has not been noticed by The Blue until now. CH in Bowley's time is described as 'primarily middle class and professional'. He wrote that going to Hertford was 'a terrifying and probably injurious experience for a child of nine years old' and Newgate Street offered 'sufficient teasing and minor unkindnesses to make life rather terrifying to the timid or thin-skinned, and some ignorant cruelty against anyone with natural peculiarities.' But boys 'were allowed a good deal of liberty to be out of the premises and their costume was known and respected throughout the City of London.' An academic high-flyer, he also enjoyed the boating club and wrote warmly of his fellow Grecians and many staff including James Barnard, Master of the RMS. On Speech Day the Grecians, holding white kid gloves, would take up a collection for their imminent expenses at university; this was called 'glove money' and Bowley's share in 1888 was fifteen pounds, ten shillings. He received an extra £10 to re-clothe himself when he handed back his uniform, and subsequently more than £300, mainly in the form of an Exhibition. At Cambridge his 'extremely kind and helpful' tutor was the Rev Richard Appleton (CH 1858-67, Governor, President CH Club 1896-7). A tribute to Bowley by Graham Hutton (TB 16-20) is quoted. And there's a surprise guest star: Sir Arthur refers to a photo in The Times showing 'the school marching over London Bridge, preceded by their band, headed by a majestic Grecian tossing his baton, in 1945, en route to the Mansion House.' The majestic one was surely Paddie Drake (CA, BB, MdB 39-47), the present Old Blue Editor?

Statistician

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BOYCE, Chris 1973–1980 (La A)

Systems and software engineer

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BRADLEY, Fari (Ba B)

Dates at CH removed at subscriber's request.

Musician, radio presenter and producer

Fari Bradley Home Page

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BRADLEY, Paul 1965–1973 (Col A)

Where are they now: At CH around 1964-1974. Being traced by Martin Broadbridge

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BRANCH, Alison 1980–1987 (Maclagan, 8's, 5's, Ba B)

Pharmacist

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Brennan, Michael 1923–1931 (Mid B)

Contributed by his son Andrew Brennan

Born before the outbreak of World War One, the second son of five children of the Vicar of Shalbourne, James Ward Brennan and Frances Cantrell, he attended Christ's Hospital School in Horsham. As a school boy he was a sprinter and competed at the White City stadium near Shepherd’s Bush. He loved everything about horses and horse racing. While at school he took bets from fellow pupils and even one or two of the masters. He joined the South Staffordshire Regiment in the early 1930s.

He married Margaret ‘Sally’ Butler in 1950 and they had three children. He retired as a Lieutenant Colonel in 1960. After many different offers, he chose the less stressful life of a driving examiner, first in London and later in Gloucestershire. After twenty years he retired and thus started the third phase of his long life. He walked or rather marched daily for nearly twenty years. This took him to the Nijmegen marches in Holland held over four days each July. He completed several marches, the last of which earned him the trophy for the fastest time for someone over 70 years.

• There was a 78 rpm record about him called “Michael Brennan has circles under his eyes!”

• In March 1935 he attended the levée in the presence of Edward VIII, then Prince of Wales.

• He helped advertise The Times newspaper in the 1970s. Huge billboards in tube stations and near motorways read “Michel Brennan reads The Times”

• He left a note: "A useless but enjoyable life. Never won a point to point"

He was a winner in so many ways. He was a distinguished leader of soldiers, a serious man who enjoyed his life, always had a twinkle in his eye and was always, a gentle...man.

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BRENNAND, Penny 1949–1957 (8's)

Now Penny Hodgson, librarian

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BREWER, David (former Almoner, current Lord Mayor of London)

Asia specialist, International Financial Services

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BREWER, Thomas 1614–1626 (CH)

Musician and composer

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BRICKEL, Tim 1987–1995 (Pe B, Pe A)

Update from Tim, 05/03/09

After leaving CH I went to Leeds College of music to study Jazz (BA hons).

I now perform with a number of different artists around the country and more and more often internationally. I have done loads of sessions over the last 10 years for Yorkshire Television….Emmerdale, Heartbeat, The Royal, At home with the Braithwaites, A touch of Frost etc etc. (After seeing the news today, hopefully that won’t be the last).

I teach for 4 days a week in schools 1 on 1 Drum - kit.

I’ve built a studio in the garden where I also teach, record and play.

My main and most exiting project at the moment is with my girlfriend Sarah Mitchell (www.sarahmitchell.biz) who has now been signed to Candid records (Jamie Cullum, Clare Teal, Stacey Kent). About to be release on April 30th at Pizza Express (Dean street) in London, is an album we recorded ourselves at home called ‘You give me something’.

We have just performed at the Dubai Jazz Festival along with Spyro Gyra and Peter Cincotti.

I have recently played with Julian Jackson (Fellow Old Blue) in his function band. What a player he is now! On the bass, drums and piano…gulp. A legend in London I hear. I have also been converting some old Beating retreat/ showband/ jazz trio videos to digital which has been really interesting.

There are plenty of current videos and pictures on Sarah’s website, and I also have a Myspace website which is www.myspace.com/timbrickel1

Some recent photos (click on each for larger version):-

Percussionist

Myspace Page

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BRIERLEY-HOWES, Charles 2001–2004 (Staff)

Artist

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BRIGHT, Roger (CH 1960s)

Chief Executive, The Crown Estate

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BRITTON, Cassie 1994–1999 (Col B)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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BROADHURST, Phil 1988–1993 (CH)

Cameraman

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BROCK, William R 1928–1934 (Th B)

Historian

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BROCKMAN-MORE, Steve 1967–1974 (Pe A)

Artist

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BROOKS, Clive 1940–1945 (Mid B)

Screenwriter - "Clive Exton"

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BROUGHTON, James 1997–2002 (Th A)

Guitarist

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BROWN, David 1952–1961 (Col A)

Gite proprietor, SW France

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BROWN, Duncan 1976–1983 (Pe B)

IT services manager

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BROWN, Fiona (Lumb, OB, left circa 1977)

Organist

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BROWN, Frederick Russell 1943–1950 (Bruno, Col B)

Engineer & sailor

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BROWN, Gemma 1994–2001 (Ba B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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BROWN, James 1716–1726 (CH)

Master, Pembroke College, Cambridge

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BROWN, Jon 1994–2001 (Pe B, Mid B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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BROWN, Martha 1999–2001 (Col A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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BROWN, Michael 1939–1943 (Warneford-Brown, Horsham Staff)

Priest

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BROWNLESS, Basil 1936–1943 (Ma A)

Music teacher & campanologist. His son, Edmund's website has a full obituary obituary as well as pages about books and articles which he wrote.

A short leaflet Basil researched

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BROWNLESS, Philip 1930–1937 (Mid A, Governor)

Priest & headmaster

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BRUCE-MITFORD, Rupert 1925–1933 (Pe A)

Archaeologist

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BRYANT, Jon 1982–1989 (Th A)

Environmental scientist

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BRYANT, Tim 1951–1961 (Mid A, Horsham Staff 1983-96)

Horsham Staff

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BUCKLER, Robert 1959–1965 (Col B)

Film producer & writer

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BUCKLEY, Shaun 1952–1958 (Col B)

Where are they now FOUND: last heard of in Toronto in the early 60's who is being sought by Michael Liberman (Col B 1951-59)

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BUDDEN, Andrew (CH circa 1976-83)

His photo in 2003

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BULLOCK, William (CH circa 1810)

Priest & hymnwriter

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BURGESS, Mark 1968–1974 (Mid B)

Illustrator & author

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BURLEIGH, Douglas H (Horsham Staff, arrived before 1926, left 1946)

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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BURNABY, Robert (CH circa 1840)

Pioneer in British Columbia

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BURNELL, Robert H 1940–1947 (Ma A)

Chemist

A clumsy automatic translation is here

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BURNS, Chris 1972–1979 (Mid B, Governor)

RFU official

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BURNS, Lucie 2000–2002 (Col A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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BURNS, Samir 1995–2002 (Th B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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BURRIDGE, Michael 1949–1957 (Ma A)

Solicitor, Blake Lapthorn, Portsmouth

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BURT, Sir Cyril 1895–1902 (1's, 14's, Ma B)

Adrian Wooldridge's Measuring the Mind: Education and psychology in England, c. 1860 - c. 1990 (Cambridge University Press, £60) gives a fine account of the storms over the reputation of Sir Cyril Burt (1's, 14's, MB 1895-1902), the pioneering educational psychologist who after his death was accused of faking his findings. Burt's defenders are shown to have a strong case but Wooldridge is frank about his disreputable side and says that on the crucial question (did Burt invent some of the twins he claimed to have studied?) no firm judgment can be made. The matter is explored again in Cyril Burt: Fraud or Framed? edited by N J Mackintosh (OUP, £23.95).

Psychologist

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BUSBRIDGE, Ida 1919–1926 (7's, Head Girl)

Ida Busbridge (7's 19-26, Head Girl) was the first woman mathematics Fellow of an Oxford College (St Hugh's) and is mentioned, with photo, in Oxford Figures: 800 Years of the Mathematical Sciences edited by John Fauvel, Raymond Flood & Robin Wilson (OUP, £35). During the war, when many skilled mathematicians were swept up into war service, she was one of the two dons who sustained Oxford's mathematical work by carrying heavy loads of lecturing, teaching and examining, and was responsible for the tutorial arrangements for all the women's colleges, not just her own.

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BUTLER, Alfred J (CH 1860s)

Classical scholar & historian

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BUTLER, Andrew 1961–1969 (Col B)

Missionary

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BUTLER, David 1991–1998 (Pe B, Th A)

Working for visual simulation software firm

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BUTLER, George 1961–1967 (Pe A)

Solicitor, Eversheds

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Butler, Michael (Unknown)

In the 1970s Michael Butler tried to stop the bureaucratic transposition of the Uffington White Horse, a symbol of Berkshire, into Oxfordshire following local government reorganisation. It was one of his rare failed campaigns

Michael Butler, who has died suddenly aged 81, was a successful public relations director with the consultancy Butler Miller Associates, which organised fundraising campaigns for notable historical projects and charities. A spirited community activist, he devoted much of his spare time to improving his local neighbourhood in Hackney, east London. After his retirement to Bristol, he was a trustee of the Sofa Project, recycling furniture for low-income families.

Mike was born in Froyle, Hampshire, into a farming family. He was brought up in Bath and, after his father's death, in Newbury, west Berkshire. It was an area for which he retained a close affection throughout his life – Mike and I, his step-brother, spent a happy day there exploring the town's ancient buildings in 2010. His attempt in the 1970s to stop the bureaucratic transposition of the Uffington White Horse, an ancient hill-carving that was a Berkshire symbol, into neighbouring Oxfordshire following local government reorganisation, was one of his rare failed campaigns.

Educated on a scholarship at Christ's Hospital, Horsham, West Sussex, he read medieval history at Selwyn College, Cambridge, graduating with a first-class degree. He joined Penguin Books as a researcher, where he worked on the Pevsner Buildings of England series, and then moved into advertising for Mather and Crowther, the agency which subsequently became Ogilvy and Mather, his first client when he and a colleague set up the Butler Miller Associates public relations consultancy.

Mike's interest in history led him to take part in a number of high-profile projects, including fundraising for St Paul's Cathedral and its choir school; organising and promoting the 1988 anniversary of the Glorious Revolution – for which he received a knighthood from the Dutch government; and the 1985 transatlantic voyage of a replica of the 17th-century ship Godspeed which carried the first settlers to Virginia in 1607. The tiny vessel, equipped with modern navigation and communication aids but no engine, had a send-off from London's docklands by the Duke of Edinburgh.

Mike ran fundraising campaigns for charities such as the Campaign for the Protection of Rural England (now the Campaign to Protect Rural England) and the Stackpole Trust, which provides wheelchair-friendly holiday accommodation, the Bristol Arts Project and the Royal Philharmonic Society music awards. Mike managed an appeal for the Cartoon Art Trust in 1990 and when a trustee, the cartoonist Mel Calman, died suddenly in 1994, he took over the lease on its gallery in Bloomsbury for a year to ensure its continuation. With his first wife Jo, whom he had met when they were both students, he set up a gallery next to their house in Kent to display the work of local painters. The couple had four children and Jo died in 1991.

Mike ran the Cleaner London Campaign at the time of the Queen's silver jubilee and later led the Hackney Grime Busters. He became a pioneer guerrilla gardener in the area, organising Sunday morning working parties to transform derelict council flower beds in the Dalston area. As a volunteer he also helped to build an eco-friendly centre for the Homerton Grove adventure playground group.

Mike, a genial, sociable and kindly man, is survived by his second wife, Stella, his children, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

• Michael Richard Dawson Butler, public relations consultant, born 23 August 1930; died 25 April 2012

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BUTLER, Robin 1960–1967 (Th B)

Rheumatologist

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BUTT, David 1938–1945 (La B)

Artist

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BYERS, Cyril Martin 1918–1922 (La B)

Held the rank of Deputy Principal at the Bank of England, died on 18 November 2004. He played rugby for the bank, was a pianist and choral singer, and contributed to the life of Croydon as Treasurer of its Guild of Social Service and part of the Croydon Writers' Circle. With his wife, who predeceased him, he had a son and a daughter. We presume he was a brother of Maurice Walter Byers (LB 16-20) who died in 1983.

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CADDEN, Alistair 1977–1982 (Pe A, Senior Grecian)

Geotechnical engineer

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CAIRNCROSS, Elizabeth 1986–2000 (Senior Mistress/Deputy Head)

Head of Wells Cathedral School

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CAMBRIDGE, Field Marshal HRH the Duke of

(President 1854-1901)

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CAMBRIDGE, Lyndsey 1995–2002 (Ba A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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CAMDEN, William (CH circa 1560)

Antiquarian and historian

Book summary

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CAMPBELL-JONES, Emma 1986–1993 (Col B)

Actress

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CAMPION, Saint Edmund 1552–1555 (CH (Reputed dates))

Jesuit martyr

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CANDLER, Christine (3's)

Where are they now FOUND: Was in 3's at Hertford in the 50's. Being traced by Rosemary Squire: her father was a Church of England vicar, and when we knew them, was at Bishop's Stortford. My sister Ruth (also an OldBlue) and I stayed with them there once during holidays. I know at one time she was in Perth, Australia, and married there but I dont remember any details.

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CANNON, Geoffrey 1951–1958 (Pe A)

Writer, editor, food & health campaigner

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CAPELL, R H Asham (CH circa 1912)

Blackshirt

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Capriccio Trio

Tim Callaghan (Head of Strings), John Thwaites (former Head of Keyboard), Alexander Boyarsky cello teacher and their ensemble 'Capriccio'

Capriccio Trio details

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CAPTAIN YARG (CH mid-1970s)

Information

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CAREY, Gerald 1935–1942 (Ma B)

Schoolteacher

His local history site

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CAREY, Lionel 1937–1953 (Horsham Staff)

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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CARRINGTON, John (OB, dates unknown)

Teacher, Halliford School, Shepperton

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CARROLL, Claire (neé PICKFORD) 1981–1988 (7s, Col B)

Claire Pickford - now Claire Carroll - is an educational psychologist specialising in autism and neuropsychological assessment in Manchester.

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CARTER, Philip Youngman 1916–1921 (Ma B)

Author, artist, editor

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CARTER, RSM (Horsham Staff ('Sagger Magger') 1940s)

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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CARTER, Sebastian (CH 1950s)

Designer & printer

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CASE, Anthea 1956–1962 (Stones, 4's)

Chair, Heritage Link

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CASS, Thomas (CH 1820s)

Pioneer surveyor in New Zealand

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CASSWELL, David 1961–1970 (Th B)

Priest

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CAUDRON, Daisy 1988–1995 (LH A, Ba B)

Film maker

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CAUSTON, John 1991–1996 (Ma A)

Royal Navy officer

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CAVENDISH, Patrick 1951–1958 (Ba A)

Publisher

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CAVENDISH, Richard 1940–1949 (Unknown details)

High time we mentioned Richard Cavendish (CH 40-49), a historian of ideas with a special interest in legends, mythology and magic, and many publications to his credit. His Mythology: An Illustrated Encyclopaedia was reissued two years ago by Little, Brown (£14.99). Another string to his bow is shown by books such as AA Explore Britain (with Tim Locke, £14.99) and AA Wonders of the World (with Rosemary Burton, £10.99). He was at one time executive editor of Out of Town magazine.

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CHACKSFIELD, Kate 1979–1981 (3's)

Broadcast journalist

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CHADWICK, Simon 1967–1973 (La B)

Market researcher

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CHALLIS, Margaret G "Peggy" 1940–1944 (Hertford Staff)

Headmistress, St Anne's School, Caversham

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CHAMBERLAIN, Matt 1994–2001 (Pe B, Pe A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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CHANDLER, JSC 1926–1933 (Col B)

Died 14 November 2001.

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CHANDLER, Keith 1956–1964 (Th A)

Poet & teacher

One of his poems

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CHAPMAN, Geoffrey 1988–1992 (Staff)

Headmaster, Queen Margaret's School, Escrick Park, York

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CHAPMAN, Simon 1977–1983 (Th A)

Marine insurance executive

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CHAPPELL, Michael John 1943–1949 (Prep A, Mid A)

Michael John Chappell, (Prep A, Mid A, 1943-49) died on 9 February 2006, having endured many years of indifferent health with considerable fortitude. He was 72 years of age.

Mike lost his father in the Battle of the Atlantic in 1940. Nevertheless, as a schoolboy it seemed inevitable that Mike too would seek to pursue a career at sea. He trained as a marine engineer under the guidance of Shaw Savill, his father's old company and served in the merchant marine until he married in 1960. Thereafter, as a family man, Mike lived a far from mundane life ashore. His employment often taking him to supervise projects abroad.

Mike and I were best mates for the whole of the seven years that we were at CH together, but regrettably lost touch on leaving the School. It was not until towards the end of 2003 that I found him on the HMS Jervis Bay website. We subsequently met for the first time in almost 55 years at the Mid A, reunion in May 2004. We and our wives Gwen and Barbara enjoyed each other’s company as if we had been close all of our lives.

Mike Elton (Prep A, Mid A, 1942-49)

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CHEEVER, Ezekiel (CH circa 1630)

New England educator

Extract

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CHEN, Ruo-Lei 1995–2002 (La B, Mid B, Pe A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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CHERNIAVSKY, Michael 1948–1966 (Horsham Staff)

Associate Professor of History, Waterloo University, Ontario

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CHEWTER, Benjamin 1995–2002 (Th B, Ma A, Ma B, Gr E)

Organ Scholar, Emmanuel College, Cambridge

Details on Big Grecian website

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CHILDS-CLARKE, Arthur 1916–1922 (Th A)

Cricketer & publican

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CHOA, Judy 1962–1969 (Evans, 6's)

Plastic surgeon (as Judy Evans)

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Christ Church, and Part of Christ's Hospital

Christ Church, and Part of Christ's Hospital Drawn by Tho. H. Shepherd. Engraved by W. Wilkinson

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Christ Church, Newgate Street, 1816

Interior of Christ Church, Newgate Street, 1816

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Christ's Hospital Maths scholars "examined" in 1819

Trinity House

This noble building is on Tower Hill. It was founded by Sir Thomas Spert, in the year 1515, at a period when the British navy began to assume a warlike appearance. It is a corporation consisting of a master, four wardens, eight assistants, and eighteen elder brethren, selected from commanders in the navy and merchant service; as a compliment some of the nobility are occasionally admitted. They may be considered as the guardians of our ships, military and commercial.

They examine the children in Christ's Hospital, and the masters of king's ships, they appoint pilots for the river Thames, settle the rates of pilotage, erect lighthouses, and sea-marks, grant licenses to poor seamen, not free of the city, to row on the Thames, hear and determine complaints of officers and men in the merchant service, and all business connected with the river Thames.

Source: Leigh's New Picture of London. Printed for Samuel Leigh, 18, Strand; by W. Clowes, Northumberland Court. 1819

Found on London Ancestor

This later turns out to be academic, rather than medical examination!

the examination of the mathematical scholars at Christ's Hospital, intended for the navy, and of the Masters of His Majesty's ships;

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Christ's Hospital mentioned in 1722 Street Survey

Street Index, List

SOURCE: REMARKS ON LONDON, being an Exact Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster, Borough of Southwark... By W. Stow., London, 1722.

C

Christ's Hospital, by Christ's Church in Newgate Street, L. This Hospital, which was formerly a Monastery of the Grey Fryers, was given by King Edward the Sixth to the City of London, in 1552, for the Education of poor Fatherless Children.

Found on London Ancestor

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Christ's Hospital named in 'Leigh's New Picture of London' 1819

Christ's Hospital

This noble and celebrated establishment is generally known by the name of the Blue Coat School, the title having reference to the costume of the children supported and educated there. The institution is famed for its antiquity, extent, and high character. It owes its establishment to the piety and virtue of that ornament of the British throne, Edward VI. With a mind formed for the exercise of humanity and charity, this excellent prince had the good fortune to have some persons near him who were inclined to direct and expand that deposition. In this particular instance Dr. Ridley, bishop of London, had the singular and enviable felicity of suggesting before the king, in a sermon preached at Westminster, the imperious demands of poverty upon the attention and commiseration of the powerful and rich. The result of their conference was, a general report to the king on the state and condition of the poor, and the best means of relief and reform. They were divided into three classes, the poor by impotency, by casualty, and the thriftless poor. For the innocent and fatherless was provided Christ's Hospital, late the Grey Friars, in London; for the wounded and diseased, the hospitals of St. Thomas and St. Bartholomew; and for the idle and vagabond, Bridewell, where they might he chastised and compelled to labour. Decayed householders, and the poor, afflicted with incurable diseases, were to be relieved at their own homes.

The establishment, as first founded, consisted only of a grammar-school for boys, and a separate school for girls, where they were taught to read, sew, and mark. In addition to these, Charles II. founded a mathematical school and ward, lying on the west part of the hospital, for the instruction of 40 boys in the mathematics, especially in that part of it that respects navigation, and liberally endowed it with l,000l, paid out of the exchequer for seven years. The Lord Mayor and corporation of London are directors and promoters of the institution, and the whole community of Great Britain have the valuable privilege and opportunity of carrying on this glorious work. The contributions made during two centuries and a half cannot be particularised, but their effects are thus abstracted from one of the annual reports ; — Children put forth apprentices, and discharged from Christ's hospital, the year last past, 194; eleven whereof, being instructed in the mathematics and navigation, were placed forth apprentices to commanders of ships, out of the mathematical school, founded by his late majesty Charles II., of blessed memory, &c.

There are generally from 1,000 to 1,200 boys and girls receiving their education, besides being clothed and boarded, in this establishment; and owing to recent inquiries, it is conducted with stricter impartiality than ever. The following is the last annual return:—

Children put forth Apprentices.................. 171

Buried last Year....................................... 12

Children now under care of the Hospital.. 1,190

To be admitted on Presentation................ 130

Source: Leigh's New Picture of London. Printed for Samuel Leigh, 18, Strand;

by W. Clowes, Northumberland Court. 1819

Found on London Ancestor

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Christ's Hospital named in 'The Charities of London' 1861

Christ's Hospital, Newgate Street, is one of the five royal hospitals of the city of London, and was founded by letters patent of Edward VI., dated June 26, 1553, from which time it has been in active operation as an educational asylum, for the reception of orphans and children or persons of limited income. The original foundation, doubtless, contemplated it for a poorer class than for whom custom and high character of the school have rendered it available for. It is, perhaps, the most important educational establishment in the country.

The number of children on the foundation, who are wholly maintained and educated, is about 1,200, including those at the proprietary establishment at Hertford. About 200 are admitted annually, always going first to Hertford. The age of admission is from seven to ten years of age; and the mose of admission is by presentation of a governor. Her Majesty, the President, the Treasurer, the Lord Mayor, and Court of Aldermen, present annually, and the other governors have presentations in rotation, as far as the number of children to be admitted in each year will extend; so that they have the privilege about once in four years. The chief qualification for obtaining a presentation, in the case of children not orphans, rest in their parents not possessing more than a very moderate income, some latitude being allowed in cases of large families, etc. A list of the governors having appointments for the year is published annually in March, and is to be had at the counting house of the hospital.

The annual income of the hospital includes an average of the following items:—from rents of estates, tithe-rent charges, about £33,000; dividends on stock and annuities, £10,000; from governors' contributions, £6,000 to £7,000; and the remainder from special endowment funds, casual receipts, legacies, etc.; amounting from all sources to about £58,000, from which £10,000 to £11,000 being deducted for rent and other charges, including exhibitions to the hospital's scholars at the Universities, funds for apprenticing children, outfit, and other allowances for royal mathematical boys, gifts for releasing prisoners for debt, and numerous expenses connected with the estates, etc.; a clear amount for the general purposes of maintenance, education, and establishment is left of about £47,000. The disbursements in ordinary years amount to about the same sum. Legacies are funded. The usual qualification of the Governor is a donation of £500.

President, H.R.H The Duke of Cambridge, K.G.—Treasurer, William Gilpin, Esq.—Clerk, George Trollope, Esq.

SOURCE: The Charities of London, by Samuel Low, Jun., London: Sampson Low, Son, and Marston, Milton House, Ludgate Hill. 1861.

Found at London Ancestor.

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Christ's Hospital Spittal Sermons at St Bridget's Church

St. Bridget

SOURCE: REMARKS ON LONDON, being an Exact Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster, Borough of Southwark... By W. Stow., London, 1722.

A List of all the Cathedrals, Churches, and Chapels of Ease within the Bill of Mortality, withal shewing therein the sett Times of publick Prayers, receiving the Sacrament, and hearing Sermons both Ordinary and Extraordinary.

Note, Pr. signifies Prayers, Sac. Sacrament; S. Sermon; and Lect. Lecturer.

St. Bridget, alias St. Brides, an antient Church in Bride Lane, near Fleetstreet, the Spire of whose Steeple is 234 Foot high, which is 17 Foot higher than that of St. Mary le Bow in Cheapside, and has the most pleasant Ring of 12 Bells about London. It contains about 1400 Dwelling Houses. Morning Pr. every Day at 11, and Evening Pr. at 8; an annual S. on St. Bartholomew's Day, Musick S. on St. Cecilia's Day, and here also are preached the Spittle Sermons, on Mondays, Tuesday, and Wednesday, in Easter Week, before the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of London, the Governors and Children of Christ's Hospital, by some eminent Divines chosen by them.

Found on London Ancestor

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Christ's Hospital, Newgate Street

Newgate Street (exterior view)

Drawn by Tho. H. Shepherd.

Engraved by W. Wallis.

Jones & Co. Temple of the Muses, Finsbury Square, London, 1831.

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CHUANG, Phyllis 1966–1973 (8's)

X-ray technologist in Canada

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CHUBB, Harriet 1995–2002 (Ba B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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CHURCHILL, Smith Wild (CH circa 1850)

Cricketer

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CLARK, Captain Norman 1929–1937 (Th A)

Died at Ravenshoe, Queensland, Australia, on 27 December 2001. Born 18 September 1920, at St.Asaph, Rhyl, North Wales, he was 81 years old.

First image of Captain Norman Clark

Norman Clark

Until Norman and his wife, Nancy, arrived in Queensland in 1984, my nearest Old Blue neighbour was over 1000 km away. When I saw Norman's address listed in the CH Club Roll of Members, I wrote to him, and discovered one of those friends who are few and far between. He was a delightfully kind and caring man, who saw only the good in those he met. They were a charming couple, and Norman was devoted to Nancy, 'the woman who saved my life'.

Second irst image of Captain Norman Clark, with his father

Captain Norman Clark with his father

When he left school, Norman joined the Territorial Army, and was called to the colours for Munich in 1938. He was commissioned into the Essex Regiment in 1940, and in 1943 joined the Parachute Brigade, serving in North Africa, Europe and the Middle East. After the War he was offered a permanent Commission and turned it down - a decision, he said, he always regretted.

Third image of Captain Norman Clark

Norman Clark and his father

He rejoined the Army at the beginning of the Korean War, was posted to the 29th Brigade as liaison officer to the US forces. He took part in the Imjin Battle, 21st April 1951, and it appears that he was severely injured, for, he said, Nancy, a Nursing Sister with the troops, saved his life.

After Korea, Norman was serving with the Rhine Army when he applied for a posting to the Kings African Rifles. He was diverted to the Kenya Regiment and was involved with operations against the Mau Mau. He resigned from the army after the Mau Mau emergency in 1957 and was employed by the Department of Veterinary Services, reorganising the Veterinary Services in all Districts of the Rift Valley Province. In 1958, Nancy joined him from England, and they were married.

An Australian veterinarian, who admired Norman's work in Kenya, persuaded them to move to Papua New Guinea in 1964, where they spent the next 18 years. Here, Norman worked for the Department of Primary Industry as a Training Officer with the Agricultural, Education and Training Branch. Based in Garoka, he was responsible for the training of all DPI Staff in the five Highland Provinces.

In 1984, Norman and Nancy retired to the village of Ravenshoe (pronounced Ravens'ho) on the Atherton Tableland, South of Cairns, in Tropical North Queensland. In these beautiful surroundings, they would spend the rest of their lives. It broke his heart when Nancy, who had heart trouble, and lived for some time with a pacemaker, died earlier in 2001 at the age of 81. Theirs was a love affair that lasted right to the end.

Norman never watched television. He was a bibliophile. His evenings were spent reading, surrounded by his extensive library and listening to music from his collection of CDs. One Christmas, when he sent me a copy of 'A Fortunate BlueCoat Boy', he wrote: 'I have yet to read it. At the moment I am reading seven books and have just started two more; I will get around to it.'

A fit man with a military bearing, he spent his retirement, either tending to his garden, or, for countless hours, studying the birds, the butterflies, and the botany of the forest around his home.

While Norman was at school, his mother, who was an accomplished sculptor, made a bust of Norman in school uniform, and cast it in bronze. This was one of his cherished possessions, and, his executor tells me that Norman bequeathed the bust to Christ's Hospital, together with two other busts.

On Friday, 11 January 2002, I drove up into the mountains, to Tully Falls, where a group of friends assembled for a Memorial Gathering to say their last farewell to Norman and Nancy, in the beautiful countryside they had grown to love. By Arthur HC Williams (CB 1934-41) January 2002

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Clark, David 1939–1945 (Thornton B)

David Clark was born in North London and entered CH at the outbreak of the Second World War, leaving, as so many did at that time, at the age of 16 just after the war in Europe ended. During the war years, many scholastic compromises had to be made due to a dearth of teachers, especially those of military age. David became an Engineering and Medical Deputy Grecian, a seemingly curious combination. Physics and Chemistry were common to both disciplines but at the times the potential Doctors studied biology, the potential Engineers were taught Maths.

On leaving CH David was apprenticed to Vosper Thorneycroft and subsequently to Worcester Mining. For his compulsory National Service he gained further engineering experience in the Coal Mining Industry where the occupation was deemed the equivalent of service with the Armed Forces. He qualified as a Chartered Engineer and as a Member of the Institute of Electrical Engineers.

In the 1960s David transferred his engineering skills to the printing industry, and the De la Rue group. He was closely involved in the evolution of quality security printing from a labour intensive activity to a highly mechanised process, where his contribution was greatly valued and which developed into a long term career with De la Rue.

Following retirement, David kept his brain active by close study of the financial markets and the Stock Exchange. He was modest in success and mocking of his failures but the overall balance was clearly positive as during this time he became a Donation Governor, subsequently renewing his presentation rights. His first Presentee became Senior Grecian. Together with his wife Janet, who survives him, he was an active member of the Herts, Beds & Bucks Old Blues.

Contributed by his widow Janet

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CLARK, Paul "Joey" 1988–1995 (Mid A)

Computer scientist

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CLARK, Ronald 1906–1911 (Th A, CH employee subsequently)

Cricketer

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CLARK, Terry 1979–1994 (Theatre Technical Manager)

Died in 2005 - information on CH Forum

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CLARK, Thomas Henry 1905–1910 (Th A)

Palaeontologist

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CLARKE, Bob (Robert Wakefield) (Cricket coach until 1978)

Cricketer, Northamptonshire

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CLARKE, Sir Richard 'Otto' 1922–1928 (Col A)

One chapter of Kevin Theakston's Leadership in Whitehall (Palgrave/Macmillan, £52.50) is devoted to Sir Richard 'Otto' Clarke (Col A 22-28), the Treasury heavyweight who also headed the Ministries of Technology and (briefly) Aviation. It's a memorable portrait, showing his energy, originality and brainpower (Tony Benn thought him the best permanent secretary he ever had) but also his bullying arrogance (Lord Cherwell called him 'the devil'). His work on reforming the public expenditure system was acclaimed by Peter Jay as 'one of the great creative acts of public administration in this century.'

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CLAUSEN, John 1990–1997 (Pe A)

Student, Cardiff University. Railway enthusiast

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CLAVADETSCHER , Iain 78–85 (Ma B, La B, Ma A )

Where are they now FOUND: Iain Clavedetscher has jointly established Clavadetscher Hoffmann Architects LLP, an architectural practice. After graduating in the early 90s, Iain and Alex have spent the past ten years with large firms of architects, working on a variety of high-profile, landmark projects. See his website link below.

Website for Clavadetscher Hoffmann Architects LLP

Iain's Housing c.v. in pdf format

Iain's General c.v. in pdf format

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CLAYSON, Timothy (CH 1960s)

Circuit judge

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CLAYTON, Sir Robert 1675–1675 (Governor from 1675)

Banker

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CLENSHAW, Jessica 1997–2002 (Col B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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CLEOBURY SUNDERLAND, Audrey 1954–1961 (Hertford Staff)

Patricia Menon (Mitchell, 2's 54-61) has taught English at Niagara College and Brock University, Ontario, Canada,and has now had a volume of literary criticism published: Austen, Eliot, Charlotte Bronte and the Mentor-Lover (Palgrave Macmillan £45). Three teachers at CH Hertford - Frances Mercer, Helen Shackleton and Audrey Cleobury Sunderland - are gratefully included in the acknowledgements.

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CLIFFORD, Francis 1928–1935 (A L B Thompson, Ma A)

Novelist

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CLOWES, William 1570–1579 (Surgeon to CH 1570s)

Queen's Surgeon. Surgeon to the Fleet

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CLYDESDALE-COTTER, Daniel 1995–2002 (Pe B, Ma A, Ma B, Gr E)

Student, Teesside University

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COATEN, Stephanie 1999–2001 (LH A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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COBB, Samuel (CH circa 1694, Under Grammar Master 1701/2-1713)

Poet & translator

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CODNER, Rose 1999–2001 (Col B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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Coetlogon, Charles Edward de 1755–1766 (Unknown details)

The Blackwell Dictionary of Evangelical Biography (1995, 2 vols) has Dr Michael Griffiths (MdB 38-46) among its contributors and includes entries on at least two OBs. Charles Edward de Coetlogon (CH 1755-66) was well known as a preacher and published many theological works defending Calvinism and attacking 'the abominations of the Church of Rome'. Thomas Hartwell Horne (CH 1789-95, curate of Christ Church Newgate Street 1819-25), encouraged at CH by Coleridge, became one of the most prolific writers of his day on subjects as varied as grazing, topography, psalmody, law, history and biblical criticism. His Introduction to the Critical Study and Knowledge of the Holy Scriptures was a standard student text.

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COLE, Jonathan (CH 1980s)

Composer

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COLE, Sir Henry 1817–1823 (CH)

Keith Mackness (TB 49-55, Governor) draws our attention to Stephen Halliday's Making the Metropolis: Creators of Victoria's London (Breedon Books, £19.99) which states that Sir Charles Barry, architect of the Houses of Parliament, went to school at CH like his collaborator Pugin. Remarkable if true, but the new Oxford Dictionary of National Biography says merely that Barry attended 'three local schools' (his family lived in Westminster - would Newgate Street have been 'local'?). Alfred Barry's 1867 Memoir of Sir Charles describes all three without naming any: the first was 'a mere preparatory school'; the second was run by a 'very dissolute' master who sometimes absented himself for weeks on end; the third 'attempted only mechanical teaching and severe discipline.' Schools one and two don't sound like CH, but school three may be a candidate, the more so as Barry acquired there 'a remarkably beautiful handwriting' which he could have learnt in our Writing School. His father was prosperous but that wouldn't have stopped Barry attending CH as a private pupil (again like Pugin) or, as Keith suggests, gaining a place there via financial sleight-of-hand. Alternatively his father's death in 1805 may have left a good part of his wealth inaccessible until his children reached their majority, leaving the family in genuine need. Can anyone tell us more? Halliday's book also has much to say about Sir Henry Cole (CH 1817-23), his deep involvement with Prince Albert and others in bringing the 1851 Great Exhibition building to fruition and his directing of its profits to the South Kensington Museums. Cole was the first Director of the V & A and raised money for building the Albert Hall. Mentioned too is a notorious CH Governor, Leopold Redpath, who frustrated a bid to build a London underground railway in the 1850s by embezzling the funds earmarked for it. He was one of the last convicts to be transported to Australia.

Our 'forgotten Great Victorian', Sir Henry Cole (CH 1817-23), is becoming less forgotten all the time. He now boasts a biography - The Great Exhibitor: The Life and Work of Henry Cole by Elizabeth Bonython and Anthony Burton (V&A Publications, £35) - described by Charles Saumarez Smith in The Spectator as impressively detailed, deeply researched and excellent, depicting 'the sort of passionate, pugnacious, self-confident public servant who built the Victorian civil service into an impressive instrument of public reform.' Cole, whose closest friend in youth was John Stuart Mill, helped bring about the penny post, organise the Great Exhibition, reform the administration of public records, establish Grimsby dock and create the Victoria and Albert Museum, whose first director he was. He wrote for the Railway Chronicle, crossing swords with Brunel over the standardisation of the railway gauge; he set up what became the Royal College of Music; he chaired the Royal Society of Arts, writing and designing as 'Felix Summerley'; he was the first person to sell Christmas cards; and (best of all, surely) he claimed to have designed the first bread board.

Halliday also has much to say about Sir Henry Cole (CH 1817-23), his deep involvement with Prince Albert and others in bringing the 1851 Great Exhibition building to fruition and his directing of its profits to the South Kensington Museums. Cole was the first Director of the V & A and raised money for building the Albert Hall.

Public servant, art patron, educator, author, inventor of the Christmas card

Biography

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COLERIDGE, Samuel Taylor 1782–1791 (CH, Senior Grecian)

Alethea Hayter in The Wreck of the Abergavenny (Pan, £6.99) reconstructs the 1805 maritime disaster in which 260 lives were lost including the ship's captain, John Wordsworth, brother of the writers William and Dorothy, who were devastated by the news. The Times reviewer noted that Charles Lamb (CH 1782-89) 'provided practical help, collecting witness statements and chasing insurance companies. The ever sympathetic Coleridge (CH 1782-91, Senior Grecian) - 'fell to the ground in a convulsive hysterical fit.'

Reviewing A Double Life: A Biography of Charles and Mary Lamb by Sarah Burton (Viking £16.99) in The Times on 27 August, Peter Ackroyd wrote with rich appreciation of Charles Lamb himself (CH 1782-89) and of Christ's Hospital. 'There is a famous story, repeated in this absorbing book, of 'two pupils going home together, parting at the door, the one to go up to his father (the master) in the drawing room, the other to go down to his father (the coachman) in the kitchen'. It is a fine example of the egalitarianism of the school'. Of Lamb's friendship with Wordsworth and the 'quixotic and fickle' Coleridge (CH 1782-91, Senior Grecian), he observed: 'It is a measure of Charles Lamb's essential kindliness and grace that he managed to maintain a relationship with these two giants of egotism to the end.'

A fascinating Times article on the West Highland Way and the Romantic travellers who invented tourism in the Highlands of Scotland drew heavily on Breaking Away: Coleridge in Scotland by Carol Kyros Walker (Yale £19.95). Walking alone in 1803 the poet covered 260 miles in eight days 'despite poor health, a drug problem and screaming nightmares- 'atonic gout'- raw toes and worn-out shoes. Romantic poets were tough in those days.'

The scholar Seamus Perry sees the notebooks of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (CH 1782-91, Senior Grecian) as 'perhaps the unacknowledged prose masterpiece of the Romantic era.' The enormous Princeton edition of all seventy or so has been ongoing since 1957, but meanwhile Perry has edited Coleridge's Notebooks: A Selection (Oxford, £17.99) which Jim McCue in The Times hailed as the best selection yet. 'Included is every kind of musing - philosophical, aesthetic, psychological - as well as incidental topographical and other notes.'

Poet, philosopher, metaphysician

Samuel Taylor Coleridge Archive

Four portraits of him - click on each to enlarge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge and the doctors by Dr Richard Guest Gornall (CB 1917&23)

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COLFE, Richard 1559–1569 (CH)

Sub-Dean of Canterbury

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COLLARD, Tim 1972–1978 (Col B)

Mother Tongues: Non-English-Language Poetry in England (edited by Stephen Watts, King's College London, £8.95) contains four pages of poems by Erich Fried translated by Tim Collard (Col B 72-78).

Diplomat

His wedding photo, October 2005 - scroll down

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COLLINGWOOD, Christopher 1965–1972 (Pe B)

The Divine Dance of Love: Sharing in the Mystery of Christ (Canterbury Press, Norwich, £7.95) by Christopher Collingwood (Pe B 65-72) is an extended meditation on how we enter into and share the experience of Jesus, with many references to the author's own life. At CH 'we were fortunate to have enterprising and stimulating chaplains, who devised imaginative services and preached well.' When he first felt a call to the priesthood, one of the chaplains persuaded him to stick with his existing plan to read music at university, not theology; 'if the vocation was genuine it would stand the test of time' - which it did.

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COLSTON, Edward (Non-Foundationer 1640s)

Philanthropist & slave trader

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COLTON, Greg 1989–1996 (La B, La A)

Army officer

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CONNEARN, David 1964–1971 (Mid A)

Artist

Photo of him in 1983

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CONNELL, Clement 1924–1932 (CH)

Baptist minister & theologian

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CONNOR, Steven 1966–1971 (Mid B)

Dumbstruck: A Cultural History of Ventriloquism (OUP, £25) is described as 'wide-ranging, relentlessly inquisitive - brimming with anecdote and insight.' The author is Steven Connor (Mid B 66-71) whose many books on English literature and cultural studies include Charles Dickens, Postmodernist Culture: An Introduction to Theories of the Contemporary, and Theory and Cultural Value. He is currently at work on a cultural phenomenology of skin.

Professor of Modern Literature & Theory, Birkbeck College, London

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CONSIDINE, Jon 1980–1987 (Ma B, Pe B, LH A)

Software developer

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CONSTANTINE, Sir Hugh 1917–1925 (Col B, Governor, Almoner)

Air Chief Marshal. Commandant, Imperial Defence College

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COOKE, Laurie 1994–2001 (Ma B, Ma A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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COOMBE, Walter (CH circa 1870)

Priest and headmaster

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COOPE, Brian 1958–1965 (Col B)

Metallurgist

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COOPER, Arthur Neville (CH circa 1860)

Priest - "The Walking Parson"

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COOPER, Jemima 2000–2002 (Ba A, Gr E)

Anatomy & Physiology student, Leeds University

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COPELIN, Ruth 1994–2001 (Col A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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CORDINGLY, David 1948–1957 (La B, Horsham Art Staff 1960s)

New from David Cordingly (La B 48-57) is Heroines and Harlots: Women at Sea in the Great Age of Sail (Macmillan, £20). The Sunday Telegraph (27 May) said Cordingly 'has mastered the information and delivered it neatly' and that 'in his re-telling of the various relevant legends we float briskly and contentedly along'.

Billy Ruffian: The Bellerophon and the Downfall of Napoleon A history of the maritime aspects of the Napoleonic War, told through the story of a single ship of the line. Bloomsbury, £16.99

Maritime historian and curator

Interview in "Sonoma Independent", 1996

Radio interview from 1999 - scroll down to "Pirates: Under the Black Flag"

Book, Under the Black Flag

Book, Women Sailors and Sailors' Women

Book,The Maritime Compendium

Book, Ships and Seascapes

Book, Billy Ruffian

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COSEDGE, Andrew 1960–1966 (Pe B)

Barrister

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COSTIN, Eric Boyd 1899–1905 (Wd 11, Col A)

Major-General

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COUGHLIN, Con 1966–1973 (Pe B)

Con Coughlin (Pe B 66-73) is the author of Saddam: The Secret Life (Macmillan, £20). 'Insightful, penetrating and shocking - the defining biography on one of the most dangerous men in the world.'

Several OBs appear in Robert Runcie: The Reluctant Archbishop by Humphrey Carpenter (Sceptre, £7.99). In wartime Oxford Runcie was in the Officers' Training Corps and was taught map-reading by Edmund Blunden (Col A 09-15, Senior Grecian) 'in a very fey kind of way; you couldn't hear what he was saying most of the time.' Back at Oxford after the war he attended Ancient History lectures by Russell Meiggs (Ma B 12-21, Senior Grecian, Horsham Staff 20s), a 'really wonderful man'. As Archbishop of Canterbury he chose as his chief of staff Ross Hook (Ba B, LB 28-36, Almoner c. 80-88) whom the present Bishop of London recalls as 'a large personality who was mis-cast as an administrative assistant.' Hook's wife Ruth did a lot of ghost-writing for Runcie. Mention is made of the book Hostage: the complete story of the Lebanon captives by Con Coughlin (Pe B 66-73).

Journalist & author

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COULSON, Edward 1995–2002 (La B, Ma A, Pe B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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Council of Almoners, The

The Council of Almoners

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COURTNEY, Frederick 1845–1857 (CH)

Bishop of Nova Scotia

Portrait photo

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COX, Dr Nicholas George 1951–1961 (Col A)

Died of liver and kidney failure after a short illness on 13 December 2004, aged 62. He was a senior official at the Public Record Office (now the National Archives) for three decades and an important pioneer of freedom of information.

Son of the Sussex cricketer George Cox, and grandson of another George Cox who played for Sussex and England, he went from CH to Pembroke College, Oxford, where he switched from Classics to English and became a historian, gaining his PhD with a thesis on 18th-century radicals.

Joining the PRO in 1968, he eventually became its director of government services, drawing up guidelines, with Whitehall departments, on the release of documents. Journalists recall his impish pleasure when steering them towards documents they might otherwise have overlooked in the mass of files released under the thirty-year rule. In teaching people inside and outside Whitehall about the intricacies in the release of official records, Cox made a major contribution to contemporary history in Britain.

A large, intermittently red-bearded man with a misleading air of distraction and with little regard for outward show (his spectacles might be held together with Sellotape), he had eclectic interests and a powerful intellect. His Latin classes at the end of the day's work were a joy.

In 1978 he wrote Bridging The Gap: A History Of The Corporation Of The Sons Of The Clergy, and in retirement he researched the history of St Martin's Church, Camden, where he was a churchwarden; the book will appear next year. He also played a prominent part in preventing the closure of the North London Line.

Sadly he did not live to witness the results of his drive for more openness after the Freedom of Information Act came into force in 2005. He leaves his wife, Jane, and two stepsons.

Historian & Public Record Office official. Died 2004

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COX, John 1925–1931 (Ma A)

Reportedly a contributor to A Box of Cuttings (stories of gardens & gardeners in Berkshire) No details available

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COXHEAD, J R W 1914–1918 (CH)

Author

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COZENS, Alexander 1749–1754 (Drawing Master)

Artist

Where to find his pictures online

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CRAIG, Norah Cicely 1921–1942 (Hertford, Headmistress)

Postcard sent by Miss Craig.

Photo of the Chapel at CH Hertford, with a list of Headmistresses 1707-1921 (Miss Craig, appointed in the latter year, served until 1942)

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CRAIGIE, Charles (Pe A circa 2003)

Security supervisor & contract manager

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CRATON, Michael 1943–1949 (Ma A)

Historian of slavery

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CRAVEN, Sir William 1611–1618 (President)

Lord Mayor of London

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CREAMER, Brian (Ba B, Governor, Almoner 1986-98)

Gastroenterologist

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CREASE, David 1938–1946 (Pe B)

Architect. Chairman, Ryedale Liberal Democrats

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CRICK, Martin 1978–1985 (La A)

Engineer

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CROCKER, Charlie 1995–2002 (Ma B, Mid B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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CROCKETT, Irina 1994–2001 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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CROSLEY, Jacquie 1980–1987 (3's, Col A)

Where are they now: Being sought by Juliana Matthews

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CUDDEFORD, Paul 1980–1987 (Pe A)

Guitarist & composer

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CULLEN, John 1971–1978 (Pe A)

Managing director, JCL legal search consultants

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CULLEN, William 1907–1913 (Pe B)

Cricketer in India

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CUMINGS, Dave (CH circa 1976-83)

His photo in 2003:

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CUMMOCK, William 1995–2002 (Ma B, Mid A, Th B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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CUNNINGHAM, Peter 1825–1831 (CH)

Author & antiquary

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CUNNINGHAM, Sir Alexander 1823–1826 (CH)

Major General & archaeologist

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CURGENVEN, Peter 1937–1948 (Horsham Staff)

Died on 24 March 2002 aged 91. He was born in 1910 and educated at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. His time at CH was interrupted by war service: joining the army in 1942, initially as second lieutenant with special duties, he returned to Horsham four years later, complete with MBE. In 1948 he departed again - 'he will be remembered by all for his tact and kindliness and by colleagues as their able and thoughtful secretary in Common Room' - to train for the ministry at Ripon College, Cuddesdon, to which he returned as chaplain in 1951 after a curacy in Goring-by-Sea. Two years later he was made Recruitment Secretary, and shortly thereafter General Secretary, of the Central Advisory Council for the Ministry (the body that selects candidates for the priesthood, known later as ACCM, ABM and the Ministry Division). In 1959 he returned to Goring as Vicar, moving in 1970 to be Rector of another Sussex parish, Rotherfield. From 1975-77 he was Rural Dean of East Grinstead. Retiring in 1979 he moved west and continued to officiate as a priest in the dioceses of Bath and Wells and Salisbury. His last known address was in Sturminster Newton, Dorset.

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CURTIN, Samuel 1995–2002 (La B, Mid A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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CURTIN, Thomas 1995–2003 (La B, Mid A, Pe B, Gr W)

Art history student, Sussex University

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D'ARCY, James (Simon D'Arcy) 1984–1991 (La A)

Actor - his details on imdb website

His website

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DACRE, Richard 1961–1967 (Ba A, Mid A)

Proprietor, Flashbacks Film Memorabilia

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DALE, Sir Langham 1834–1844 (CH)

South African educator

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DALLY, Frederick (CH 1850s)

Photographer in Canada

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DALMAINE, Cyril 1925–1930 (Horsham Staff)

This may be well known but was news to me: the composer, conductor, broadcaster and journalist Jonah Barrington (Cyril Dalmaine, Horsham Staff 25-30) produced an autobiography (And Master of None, Walter Edwards, 1948) in which he wrote of CH with huge admiration. His portrait of William Hamilton Fyfe (Headmaster 19-30) is instantly recognisable. 'He ruled this vast virile community ... with a velvet glove entirely innocent of any hidden mailed fist. His only disciplinary weapon was an outrageous and awful and irrepressible sense of humour..... He was the true democrat, and Christ's Hospital the true democracy.' Among outstanding staff were Tony Kitson (dates?) 'who played golf as elegantly as he played the organ', Twinkle Wilkinson (02-29) 'who had a genius for making boys sing in tune' and Dr Friend (Medical Officer until 1946) 'who cured me of boils and all shyness in matters appertaining to the body (he would bark the most intimate instructions at the top of his voice)'. Barrington staged orchestral concerts 'on the slightest provocation', causing much upheaval. 'Fyfe approved, turned up to every concert, and shielded me from the slings and arrows of outraged housemasters.' All the key components of CH are still there, Barrington says, 'and if ever I had a son I would move heaven and earth to see he were there too.' In earlier days at the Royal College of Music, he and Constant Lambert (CA 14-22) - 'a brilliant young modernist with a limp' - were two of the three candidates for the Mendelssohn composition scholarship. Neither won.

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DANE, Derek 1943–1949 (Ma B)

Clinical trichologist

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DANIEL, Sir John 1952–1961 (Mid A, Governor, Senior Grecian)

Lifelong Learning - Open Learning - Distance Learning (European Distance Education Network) contains contributions by at least two OBs. Jane Goodsir (Hertford, dates?) writes on education and training in the UK drugs service, while Sir John Daniel (MdA 52-61) examines the use of new media in distance education and looks at the 'mega-universities'.

President, Commonwealth of Learning

His speech at CH Prize Giving, December 1999

His 2002 Gaitskell Lecture, including CH memories

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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Dankwah, Anton 1993–2000 (Pe B, Mid A)

FOUND: Anton instigated an ‘old boy’s network’ for the Allegis Group , which continues, but has now moved on from Allegis Group to begin working as a consultant for Accenture.

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DAVEY, Sean 1992–1992 (Staff)

Rugby referee

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DAVIDSON, Cmdr James Alfred 1933–1939 (Ma B)

Died on 6 March aged 82. He had three successive careers: in the Navy, the Commonwealth Relations Office and the Pensions Appeal Tribunal.

He came to CH from Portsmouth Grammar School, went on to the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, and then served in every theatre of the war at sea. At Diego Suarez in Madagascar he took part in the first successful British landing of the war. Appointed in 1943 to the frigate Calder, he took temporary command in February 1944 aged just 21. Later that year he joined HMS Rocket and participated in the Battle of Penang. After postwar pilot training he joined HMS Childers, policing illegal Jewish immigration into Palestine.

In 1951 he was posted as naval liaison officer to the Chinese Nationalist Government, with the Korean War in progress and the Communist Chinese threatening the offshore islands. Returning to England he commanded the minesweeper Welfare before leaving the Navy and studying law. He was called to the Bar but joined the CRO and became first secretary in the newly independent Trinidad before moving to Phnom Penh in 1969. There he had good relations with Prince Sihanouk, the head of state; but Sihanouk was deposed in 1970, the Khmer Rouge closed in on the city and the Davidsons were kept awake at night by mortar fire. All who worked for them fell victim later to the horrors of 'Year Zero'. Davidson was an authority on the region; his 1979 book Indo-China: Signposts in the Storm was well received.

Appointed OBE in 1971, he moved in 1972 to East Pakistan as deputy high commissioner. His first task was to witness mass burials of victims of the India-Pakistan war. He worked closely with Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, first Prime Minister of the new state of Bangladesh, and was involved in the negotiations when Indira Gandhi first visited the new country. He also rebuffed Robert Maxwell's efforts to make a quick buck there. Next he moved to Brunei as High Commissioner, becoming a trusted adviser to the Brunei Royal Family during the progress towards independence. His final posting was as Governor of the British Virgin Islands, where he gained the trust of a previously hostile population and resisted bids by organized crime to infiltrate the colony's financial institutions.

Retiring from the Diplomatic Service in 1981 he went to the LSE as a visiting fellow, did a pupillage at the Admiralty Bar, realised it was impractical to embark on a Bar career aged sixty and accepted appointment as legal chairman of Mental Health Review Tribunals and deputy president of the Pensions Appeal Tribunal, an almost full-time commitment for thirteen years. In the mid-90s he acted as president of that tribunal but declined an invitation to do the job permanently.

In 1955 he married Daphne White. She survived him, with two sons and two daughters.

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DAVIDSON, Katherine 1994–2001 (Ba A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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DAVIES, Howard 1956–1963 (CH)

Theatre director

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Davies, Peter Drummond 1933–1939 (Middleton B)

Peter had a long and interesting life, the foundations of which were laid at Christ’s Hospital, but so deep and supportive were they that they influenced almost everything he did in both his business and personal life.

Peter was born with an enquiring mind and on leaving Housey; he was apprenticed to Standard telephones and Cables as an Engineer, combining his work with studying at Aston University, Birmingham. Later on in the war, he joined de Havilland at Hatfield as part of a design and test team working on the first jet engine. He was only 27 when he became Works Manager of Blythe and Platt (Reckitt & Coleman Group) Watford, dealing with the manufacture of shoe and furniture polish. He updated the machinery and working practises and involved himself in the sales and marketing. He then turned his attention to electronics and joined London Electric as Production Manager, subsequently starting his own electronics company. When it was taken over by a competitor he stayed on as General Manager and a Director until he retired.

In his sporting life, Peter was a good swimmer and swam regularly at the Pool, Ilford where he met and swam with the Olympic team which probably helped him to win a cup for swimming at Housey. He enjoyed his rugby and played with the Old Blues, Saracens and Wasps. He was also a keen golfer (West Wilts GC) and supportive of the Old Blues Golfing Society.

But his links with Housey were many and varied. Having been a Presentee himself and mindful of the Charge, he had been given when leaving, he and his wife Hilda committed themselves to three Presentees, one of whom, Julian Taylor, spoke most elegantly at Peter’s funeral, Peter was am member of the Amicable Society of Blues, the Benevolent Society of Blues and Founder’s Day Stewards. In Freemasonry, he held the highest offices in the Christ’s Hospital Lodge, Royal Arch and Rose Croix Chapters.

He certainly enabled others to enjoy the advantage he received and discharged his debt to the School in every phase of his life. He leaves a son, two daughters and his wife.

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DAVIES, Phil 1951–1957 (Horsham Staff)

Rugbyman & headmaster

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DAVIES, Rev Basil Tudor 1928–1937 (La A)

His death in January 2001 we belatedly reported last term, studied at Keble College, Oxford, before training for the ministry at Westcott House, Cambridge. Ordained in 1942/3, he spent seven years as a curate in the diocese of Southwark, first at St Luke with St Paul, Charlton, then from 1944 at St Andrew's, Stockwell Green. He was in India from 1949 to 1953, returning to a four-year curacy in Wantage, Oxon, and was Vicar of Wigston Magna, Leics, from 1957. Transferring in 1973 to the diocese of Ely he was Rector of St Peter's, Upwell, until 1977, serving also as priest-in-charge of Nordelph 1975-77. He returned to Oxfordshire as Chaplain to the Community of St Mary the Virgin, Wantage, with licence to officiate throughout the diocese. In 1988 he retired, only to become priest-in-charge of Steventon with Milton for a year, after which his licence was renewed. Latterly he lived at the College of St Barnabas, Lingfield, like the Rev G K Allen (Horsham Staff 06-24) before him.

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DAVIS, Barnaby 1994–2001 (Pe B, Ma A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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DAVIS, Matthew (Pe B)

Where are they now: Being traced by Ian Hughes (1966-1972)

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DAVIS, R H C 1947–1948 (Horsham Staff)

The Oxford University Press has published The Gesta Guillelmi of William of Poitiers (£40) edited and translated by the late R H C Davis (Horsham Staff 47-48) and Marjorie Chibnall. Davis was a Fellow of Merton College, Oxford, and a history professor at Birmingham.

Historian

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DAVIS, Sir Colin 1938–1944 (Th B)

Belated mention for a book published in 1998 for the sixtieth-birthday retrospective exhibition of painter Benedict Rubbra (Col A 49-56, Horsham Art Staff 60s). Benedict Rubbra: Paintings 1958-98: Ideas and Influences (Edizioni Electa, £9.95) has eighty-nine illustrations, many in colour. Its text amounts to a short autobiography, complete with CH material, notably a loving account of Nell Todd (Horsham Staff 50-69), inspiring and eccentric Head of Art. Rubbra found her impossible to paint: 'Miss Todd only looks herself when she puts on her hundred and one facial expressions and when I tell her to keep still, it looks nothing like her.' At her instigation Rubbra painted the Hon David Herbert (Horsham Staff 55-61) who went into publishing and commissioned two books from Rubbra; Herbert's widow Brenda edited the present one. A later and grander portrait commission involved Sir Colin Davis (Th B 38-44). (Rubbra also did a posthumous portrait of George Seaman (Th A, Ba B 20-27, Headmaster 55-70, Governor), never yet reproduced in The Blue.)

Tainted by Experience: A Life in the Arts (Faber & Faber, £25) is a spirited autobiography by Sir John Drummond, the former head of BBC music, Radio 3 and the Proms. He writes admiringly of his predecessor Sir William Glock (Ba B 19-26/8), the architect Nicholas Thompson (Pe B 45-52), the conductor Sir Colin Davis (Th B 38-44) and Patrick Deuchar (La A 59-66) who transformed the Albert Hall. BBC Director General Sir Ian Trethowan (Ma A 33-38) pops up fleetingly, a dark-suited, watch-chained figure beside his vast, bald, kaftan-and-beads-wearing Chairman, George Howard.

President, London Symphony Orchestra

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DAVIS, Stella 1959–1964 (Young, 1's, 3's)

Stella Davis (Young, 1's/3's 59-64) started writing poetry in the Eighties and in recent years has had two contrasting poet-in-residence posts: at her home port of Southampton and at Winchester Cathedral. Each generated a book: Watershot (Wanda Publications, ?5) and St Swithun's Day (Friends of Winchester Cathedral; available from Stella herself at 40 Belmont Road, Southampton SO17 2GE, for ?5 including postage (cheques payable to 'SD Watershot')).

One critic has written of 'that typically understated, seemingly casual, but surprisingly effective tone of voice that Stella Davis makes her own,' noting that in Watershot she 'creates a sense of the quayside as the enticing edge of the rest of the world, the starting point for endless explorations.' Stella attended Southampton University and is married with two children.

Article and photo of Stella

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DAWSON, Claire 1980–1987 (1's, Col B)

Where are they now FOUND: Being sought by Juliana Matthews

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DAY, Donald 1976–1982 (?)

Where are they now FOUND: Being traced by Mike Le Butt (1976-1982)

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DAY, Heather 1960–1964 (Ewbank, 5's, 8's)

Teacher, editor, bibliographer

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DAY, Leah 1995–2002 (Col B, Hertford, Gr?)

Details on Big Grecian website

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DE LA GARDE, Philip le Hardy (CH circa 1880)

Coleopterist

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DE SAUSMAREZ, Maurice 1926–1932 (Ma A)

Artist & teacher

Picture London View 1

Picture, London View 2

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DEACON, David 1949–1955 (Mid A)

Where are they now FOUND: Who it is thought went to South Africa as a mining engineer, being traced by James Hamilton

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DEATH, MICHAEL LUCIFER -?Alias (CH circa 1970)

Painter and interior designer

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DEECH, Baroness 1953–1961 (Ruth Fraenkel, 7's)

Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education

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DEEKS, Stuart (Col A 1960s)

Musician & homeopath

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DENMAN, Simon 1976–1983 (La B)

IT marketing specialist

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DENMAN, Steven 1994–2001 (Th B, Ma A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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DENNISON, Robin 1953–1960 (Col B)

Founder & owner, Elixir Steel Art:

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DEUCHAR, Patrick 1959–1966 (La A)

Tainted by Experience: A Life in the Arts (Faber & Faber, £25) is a spirited autobiography by Sir John Drummond, the former head of BBC music, Radio 3 and the Proms. He writes admiringly of his predecessor Sir William Glock (Ba B 19-26/8), the architect Nicholas Thompson (Pe B 45-52), the conductor Sir Colin Davis (Th B 38-44) and Patrick Deuchar (La A 59-66) who transformed the Albert Hall. BBC Director General Sir Ian Trethowan (Ma A 33-38) pops up fleetingly, a dark-suited, watch-chained figure beside his vast, bald, kaftan-and-beads-wearing Chairman, George Howard.

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DIMOPOULOS, Alex 1993–2000 (La B, Ma A)

Alex Dimopoulos (La B, Ma A 1993-2000) runs a couple of creative businesses:

Creative Kite www.creativekite.com

Is a creative company that offers photography, graphic, design, web and branding.

My Love Story www.my-lovestory.co.uk

Elegant and creative, yet beautifully simple wedding photography

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DIMOVSKI, Dime 2000–2001 (Ma A, Gr E)

Student, Faculty of Music Arts, Skopje, Macedonia

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DINGLE, Rodney 1940–1947 (Pe B)

Teacher, oarsman, choral conductor

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DODS, Emma 1994–2001 (Ba B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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DOLMAN, Dr Claude 1916–1925 (Ba A, Senior Grecian)

Theobald Smith (1859-1934) was America's most distinguished early microbiologist and comparative pathologist. A renowned microbiologist of a later generation, Dr Claude Dolman (BA 1916-25, Senior Grecian), died in 1994 leaving an unfinished biography of Smith, which has now been completed by Richard J Wolfe and published as Suppressing the Diseases of Animals and Man: Theobald Smith, Microbiologist (Boston Medical Library, $45).

Microbiologist

More details of his book

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DONALDSON, John 1970–1976 (Mid B)

Independent financial adviser

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DONALDSON, John William 1920–1927 (Ma A)

Squadron Leader, RAF

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Dormitory photo, Newgate Street

The Oxford Illustrated History of Britain by Kenneth O Morgan (Oxford Paperbacks, £16) includes a fine photograph of a 'dormitory' - which could well be the Infirmary - at CH Newgate Street.

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DOUCH, Arthur 1924–1932 (La B)

Army officer

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DOUGLAS, Keith 1931–1938 (La A, Mid B)

Recent books by John Purkis (Mid B c. 1950): A Preface to Wilfred Owen (Longman, ?14.99) - in which the names of Edmund Blunden (CA 09-15, Senior Grecian), Keith Douglas (La A, Mid B 31-38) and John Middleton Murry (3's, Ma A 01-08) crop up - and Teach Yourself Greek Civilization (Hodder & Stoughton, ?8.99).

The Letters of Keith Douglas Edited by Desmond Graham The finest British poet of the Second World War. 'His letters tell the story of a man fully engaged by his art and his age.' Carcanet, ?14.95

Poet

Some of Douglas' poems

Douglas' Letters, published in 2000 by the Carcanet Press, run by Michael Schmidt, Th B 1965-66

The Keith Douglas Archive at Leeds University

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DOUGLAS, W A B (Alec) 1938–1947 (La A)

Before retiring in 1994, W A B (Alec) Douglas (LA 38-47) was the official historian of the Canadian Armed Forces. Since then he has been writing and editing chapters for the official history of the Royal Canadian Navy in World War Two. In May the Department of National Defence in Ottawa launched the first volume, No Higher Purpose: The Official Operational History of the Royal Canadian Navy, 1939-1943 (Vanwell Publishing, $60), of which he is the first principal author. Volume Two will appear sometime in 2004.

Canadian naval historian

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DOWN, C. G (Gordon) 1925–1931 (Col A, Governor, Vice President Old Blues RFC since at least 1949)

Fred Grant has reported that Gordon Down died on 16 December 2001. He was aged 87 and was a Vice President of the Old Blues RFC since at least 1949.

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DOWSETT, Roger 1955–1962 (Mid A)

Lawyer & musician. Died 2004

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DOYLE, John 1940–1948 (Prep B, Mid A)

Retired as Executive Vice President, Hewlett Packard.

He holds degrees from Glasgow and Stanford Universities

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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DRAKE, C S 1939–1947 (Col A, Ba B, Mid B)

The renowned statistician Sir Arthur Bowley (CH 1879-88, Governor) left detailed notes on his schooldays, which his daughter Agatha used when writing A Memoir of Professor Sir Arthur Bowley (1869-1957) and his Family. Published in 1972, the book has not been noticed by The Blue until now. CH in Bowley's time is described as 'primarily middle class and professional'. He wrote that going to Hertford was 'a terrifying and probably injurious experience for a child of nine years old' and Newgate Street offered 'sufficient teasing and minor unkindnesses to make life rather terrifying to the timid or thin-skinned, and some ignorant cruelty against anyone with natural peculiarities.' But boys 'were allowed a good deal of liberty to be out of the premises and their costume was known and respected throughout the City of London.' An academic high-flyer, he also enjoyed the boating club and wrote warmly of his fellow Grecians and many staff including James Barnard, Master of the RMS. On Speech Day the Grecians, holding white kid gloves, would take up a collection for their imminent expenses at university; this was called 'glove money' and Bowley's share in 1888 was fifteen pounds, ten shillings. He received an extra ?10 to re-clothe himself when he handed back his uniform, and subsequently more than ?300, mainly in the form of an Exhibition. At Cambridge his 'extremely kind and helpful' tutor was the Rev Richard Appleton (CH 1858-67, Governor, President CH Club 1896-7). A tribute to Bowley by Graham Hutton (Th B 16-20) is quoted. And there's a surprise guest star: Sir Arthur refers to a photo in The Times showing 'the school marching over London Bridge, preceded by their band, headed by a majestic Grecian tossing his baton, in 1945, en route to the Mansion House.' The majestic one was surely Paddie Drake (Col A, Ba B, Mid B 39-47), the present Old Blue Editor?

Romanesque Fonts of Northern Europe and Scandinavia
The first such survey in the English language, based on substantial research in all the areas covered. Boydell, ?75

Army officer, personnel & training manager, art historian

His book "The Romanesque Fonts of Northern Europe and Scandinavia"

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DRAKE, Hazel 1946–1951 (CH)

Now Hazel Hucker, novelist

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DRAY, Martin 1981–1988 (LH B/LH A)

Barrister

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DRAYSON, FitzAlan 1895–1905 (Wd 4, Pe A)

Cricketer & army officer

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DRUMMOND, Rory 2000–2000 (Staff)

Staff

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DUCKER, Rev Vere Townshend 1938–1942 (Hertford Chaplain)

Death in March 1996. Born in 1904, he studied at Wadham College, Oxford, which he supported devoutly for the rest of his life, notably as the mainstay of its boat club; in 1992 he was elected to a Foundation Fellowship. He trained for the ministry at Wycliffe Hall and after curacies in Leeds and Southend-on-Sea became vicar of All Saints with St John, Hertford, in 1936, later acquiring the additional role of chaplain to the CH girls' school. In 1942 he moved to be vicar of Tideswell, Buxton, Derbyshire. Much involved in youth work, liturgical reform and ecumenical relations, especially with the Orthodox churches, he appeared regularly on BBC religious programmes in the Fifties. From 1961-66 he was rector of Hanborough, Oxon. Thereafter it seems he lived in Haslemere, Surrey, and officiated in the dioceses of Guildford and Chichester. He was Vice President of Derbyshire County Cricket Club and had a long connection with Henley Regatta. Sir Claus Moser has written, 'Vere was a special person, wonderfully warm, kind, full of humour - a truly good man. He enriched our lives and will live on in our memories.'

Clergyman and oarsman

"In the Beginning"

Editor letter

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DUFFETT-SMITH, Peter 1960–1969 (Pe A, Senior Grecian)

Radio astronomer

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DUGGAN, Jeremiah Joseph (Jerry) 1992–1999 (Th A)

Died March 2003. To contribute to the JEREMIAH DUGGAN MEMORIAL FUND or to offer other help such as legal advice, or assistance with government lobbying, please contact The Jeremiah Duggan Memorial Fund, BM Jerry London WC1 3XX

--- UPDATE NOVEMBER 2006 ---

From Jeremiah Duggan's Mother, Erica:

There have been new developments as a result of our investigations and legal action over the last three and a half years. At the moment many of Jerry's friends are trying to help us raise the money to fund out campaign.

The police have never investigated fully my son's death and for that reason I am forced to take legal action to try and get what is our right: a full investigation into Jeremiah's death.

Could you be so kind as to update your obituary section. As there has not been an investigation in Germany or Britain we are left with many unanswered questions and new investigations cast doubts even on the alleged traffic accident.

[Below is] an update of an outline of the case and also could you note the address of the Memorial Fund as we are in urgent need to raise the money to pay the lawyers in Germany. We only had one month to prepare a legal answer and I had to agree to a paying for expenses otherwise I would not have to give up and never find out the cause of my son's death.

The Justice for Jeremiah Campaign

Outline of the Suspicious Death:

  • March 2003. Jeremiah Duggan, a British student, 22 years, studying in Paris, went to Germany because he felt strongly that he wanted to protest against the Iraq War. He was led to believe that there was to be a big Conference with many important politicians where he could learn more about politics.
  • He was unaware that he was coming under the influence of Lyndon LaRouche a convicted fraudster, with views based on conspiracy theories and connections to extremist groups.
  • The LaRouche Organization is documented as a political cult with a history of terror tactics, brainwashing and intimidation. Many publications show anti-British and anti-Semitic viewpoints.
  • Shortly before his death, Jeremiah made several telephone calls to his family and girl friend indicating that he believed his life was in danger.
  • Then at 6.10 am at five kilometers outside the town of Wiesbaden Jeremiah’s dead body was found at the side of the autobahn.
  • The German authorities concluded on the spot, with no questions asked, that Jerry had committed suicide by running into the path of two cars.
  • The police took no witness statements, failed to investigate the full circumstances, destroyed immediately Jeremiah’s clothes and shoes and failed to carry out a post mortem or to take notice of the parent’s requests for a full investigation.
  • The English Inquest discounted the view that this was suicide but accepted the German view that Jeremiah was hit by two private motors.. The Coroner admitted there was a lack of information but decided to close the case. He stated that earlier Jeremiah had been in a state of terror.
  • Too many questions were left unanswered.
  • Jeremiah was a popular life loving young man with no medical history of suicide attempts.

New Evidence; Failure to Investigate.

  • For the last three and a half years Erica Duggan has uncovered new facts and collected expert reports which suggest foul play.
  • New findings from an independent forensic photographer Paul Canning, an experienced Metropolitan Police forensic photographer, states “I do not believe that the damage to either vehicle was caused by the impact of Jerry’s body. There are no traces of skin, hair, blood or clothing on either vehicle, nor is there any blood, tissue or clothing debris on the road, (except for blood in the immediate vicinity of the body) nor are there any tyre marks or signs on either Jerry or on the cars, to indicate that either vehicle came into contact with the body.”
  • Paul Canning: “I have never photographed a vehicle that has hit a person at speed and has caused their death, without there being some obvious signs that both body and vehicle have made contact ( eg. Blood, tissue, hair or clothing traces) Furthermore, I have never seen or photographed a pointed /sharp dent, such as the one on the Peugeot front right hand door, that has been caused by an impact with a person. In my opinion, this dent is more likely to have been caused by contact from a heavy instrument, or even another vehicle.”
  • The cars appeared to have been moved thus violating the integrity of the scene and many unanswered questions remain.
  • The German police Inspector said to the parents; “We do not want to investigate the LaRouche organization or the circumstances surrounding this case.”
  • The Manageress of the LaRouche Schiller Institute was in possession of Jeremiah’s passport and made misleading statements that Jeremiah was a mental patient of the Tavistock clinic.
  • The people last with Jeremiah have refused to speak with the family and continue to assert that Jeremiah was on drugs when all blood tests prove the contrary. Jeremiah was opposed to any drug taking and had never been diagnosed with psychological problems.
  • In Germany there was no medical examination of injuries and in UK there was no mention of traffic accident on the non- forensic post mortem report.

Legal Moves and the Appeal for Donations.

  • In Germany the County Court of Hessen has refused the family’s request for an investigation and supported the German police view of suicide.
  • The County of Hessen have recently turned down all applications for a full investigation.
  • It is intended that the lawyers in Germany will submit the case to the Federal Court in Germany which is the highest Court in the land, asserting that citizen’s rights are violated by a failure to fully investigate a sudden violent death. These applications present a very strong case and if refused will be filed with the Court of Human Rights.
  • In the UK, Leigh Day and Co, believe that this case merits a fresh inquest with a full and fearless inquiry into this suspicious death. They will be asking the Attorney General to use his power to quash the original Inquisition and order a new Inquest.
  • Funds are needed urgently to support these legal moves and so that further investigations to uncover the truth behind this violent and unexpected death can go ahead.
  • The safety of all young people is at stake.
  • The human rights of all are involved in this need to investigate a suspicious death.

WE LAUNCH NOW A SPECIAL APPEAL FOR DONATIONS SO THAT WE CAN CONTINUE OUR CAMPAIGN TO ATTAIN JUSTICE.

For more details go to www.justiceforjeremiah.com

Write: justiceforjeremiah@googlemail.com

All donations are gratefully received and will be fully acknowledged.

The Jeremiah Duggan Memorial Fund

BM Jerry London WC1 3XX

- - - End Update - - -

We were shocked to learn of the death in disturbing circumstances in March 2003 of Jeremiah Joseph (Jerry) Duggan (TA 92-99) who had been living in Paris since 2001 as a student at both the Sorbonne and the British Institute, where he was doing a degree in English Literature. According to reports in the national press, he was opposed to the military action in Iraq and became involved with a group campaigning against it which, unknown to him, was an extreme right-wing organisation, said to have a history of intimidation and terror tactics. In March he travelled to Wiesbaden, Germany, for a conference of the group and realised its nature; in one incident he stood up when a speaker denounced the Jews and said 'But I am a Jew,' and was greeted by silence. In the early hours of 27 March, having told his girlfriend he'd 'found out some very grave things' and would take the train to Paris the next day, he rang his mother in great distress saying he was 'in deep trouble' and 'wanted out' from the group. Forty minutes later he was seen running along a road five kilometres outside Wiesbaden, where he died after being hit by a series of vehicles. He was 22.

The German police are said to have decided within hours that he had killed himself. Reportedly they took no official signed statements from witnesses, and the notes they did take were inadequate and contradictory. No autopsy was carried out, and the expert reports on the road accident were inconsistent, not corresponding to the marks found on Jerry's body. The conference organisers said he was psychologically ill and had 'run off', though he had no history of psychiatric illness and had given no indication that he might harm himself. His family have consistently denied that he committed suicide, and at an inquest in November the North London coroner agreed, explicitly rejecting a suicide verdict and instead giving an unusual 'narrative verdict' - literally a description of the events leading to the death - noting that Jerry had been 'in a state of terror' beforehand. This decision has strengthened calls for Jerry's death to be re-investigated.

A talented tennis player and poet, Jerry is remembered for his boundless energy and enthusiasm for life. His family have set up the Jeremiah Duggan Memorial Fund, which aims to get the German authorities to conduct a full investigation into his death. Donations and offers of help (legal advice, or assistance with government lobbying) can be made to:

The Jeremiah Duggan Memorial Fund

BM Jerry London WC1 3XX

Justice for Jeremiah.com

Email the Jeremiah Duggan Memorial Fund

Student in Paris (British Institute & Sorbonne)

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DULEY, Mark 1989–1991 (Staff)

Chorus Master, RTÉ Philharmonic Choir

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DUNCAN, Kathleen 1956–1965 (Dale, 3's, Head Girl, Governor, Almoner)

Director General, Lloyds TSB Foundation for England & Wales (retired 2006)

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DUNCAN, Patrick 1986–1992 (Staff)

Priest & painter

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DUNN, Charis 1966–1971 (8's)

Charis Chan (8's 66-71) former BBC news journalist and author of books on China, Charis now works as a BWY yoga teacher in Poole Dorset.

Now Charis Chan or Dunn-Chan, former BBC Asia analyst, online journalist, author and now BWY yoga teacher

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DURANT, Henry 1914–1919 (Th B)

Pioneer of opinion polling

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DURHAM, R.H. 1933–1940 (Th B)

Longman has reprinted the 1953 simplified version of Alan Paton's Cry, the Beloved Country devised by G F Wear and R H Durham - presumably the OB (TB 33-40) of that name.

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DYMOKE, Lt-Col John 1937–1943 (Col B)

A full-page photo of the Queen's Champion, Lt-Col John Dymoke (CB 37-43), with a gauntlet at his feet, can be found in Keepers of the Kingdom: The Ancient Offices of Britain by Alastair Bruce, Julian Calder and Mark Cator (Seven Dials, £16.99).

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EDMANDS, Simon 1977–1983 (La A)

Charity fundraising manager

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EDMONDS, John 1954–1962 (Mid B)

Greg Rosen's Dictionary of Labour Biography (Politico's, £30) has entries on three OBs and an ex-Almoner (Ken Livingstone). The political economist Stuart Holland (La A 51-59) was 'the main influence behind the more radical policy agenda that emerged in the Labour Party after the disappointments of the 1964-70 Wilson government', while Cabinet minister Michael Stewart (La A 18-25) was 'the safest pair of hands' in that government. Union leader John Edmonds (Mid B 54-62) was affected by Housie's 'atmosphere of snobbery' and 'ethos of being a minor public school'; CH 'did not allow the young man to develop his personality' (but, in fairness, it did help him get into Oxford).

Ex General Secretary, General Municipal & Boilermakers' Union

Biography

Guardian profile

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EDWARDS, David 1986–1991 (Staff)

Teacher at Radley

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EDWARDS, Halina 1962–1974 (Ran the CH nursery)

HALINA EDWARDS, who ran the Christ's Hospital nursery school between 1962-74, died peacefully on 18 November 2001 at the age of 82. She was the second wife of John Edwards (Horsham Staff 39-74) and the mother of Jan de Walden (MdA 64-71), both of whom survive her with her other son Ludovic. Donations in her memory will be welcomed by Macmillan Cancer Relief Midhurst, Appeal Office, King Edward VII Hospital, Midhurst, West Sussex GU29 0BL. A Thanksgiving Service for her life will be held at the Roman Catholic Church of the Divine Motherhood, Midhurst, in the New Year on a date to be announced.

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EDWARDS, John 1939–1974 (Horsham Staff)

From Jan de Walden (Prep B, LHB and Mid A 64-71): I write to you with the sad news of the death of my stepfather John Edwards (JHE) who passed away peacefully at his home in Northamptonshire last night, on Sunday 27 November 2005. He was 92 years old and had been rather frail since picking up a chill whilst standing in the cold at a very long Remembrance Sunday parade. He was a wonderfully kind and generous man and will be fondly remembered by his family, friends and all the pupils with whom he shared his knowledge in so many years of teaching service, both at Christ's Hospital and later in Midhurst, Sussex.

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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EDWARDS, Reginald 1890–1896 (Hertford, Wd 5)

Cricketer

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EDWARDS, Sam (CH c.1688)

When Pepys's long-serving maid Jane Edwards was widowed he got her son Sam Edwards into CH; Sam was one of the pupils presented to James II in early 1688, later became a Navy officer and may have represented his mother at Pepys's funeral. Sir Hans Sloane (Physician to CH 1694-1730, Governor 1715) was Pepys's doctor and helped conduct his autopsy in 1703. Four years earlier Pepys had been given the Freedom of the City of London for his service to Christ's Hospital.

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EDWARDS, Tim (CH circa 2000)

Student, King's College, London

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ELDRIDGE, Sarah 1966–1971 (8's)

Journalist & media officer

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ELLIOTT, ? 1972–1979 (?)

Where are they now: From Steve Le Butt on 21st Nov 2005 and so the stag do is probably a distant memory by now!!: I wonder if you can help, I have the dubious honour of organising a stag do for Jon Watson Miller (the second one I might add!) and I am trying to find Chris Bell (1972-1979 ) and Elliott, same year, but can't remember his first name. Do you have any details for either of them?

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ELLIOTT, David 1972–1992 (Horsham Staff)

Head of marching band & orchestra, Rikkyo School, West Sussex

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EMBERSON, Rowan 1951–1959 (Col A)

Entomologist

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EMERSON, Patrick 1981–1988 (Mid A)

Actor

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ENNIS, Catherine (6's 1965 to 1971, Horsham Staff circa 1985)

Organist

Review of her CD Tuba Tune

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Entrance Exams discussion

A discussion of the CH entrance exams

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ETHERDEN, Peter 1957–1964 (Ba A)

The author, economist and publisher Peter Etherden (BA 57-64) advises anyone who wants to understand what John Maynard Keynes is about to get hold of Keynes And After by Michael Stewart (LA 18-25). First published by Penguin in 1967, 'it is far and away the best book available on the subject and a masterpiece of political writing.'

Economist, author and publisher - "William Shepherd"

About the author

His letter to the Hutton Inquiry

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EVANS, Andree 1942–1949 (4's)

Actress

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EVANS, Arthur 1927–1934 (Headmaster CH Prep)

Priest. Headmaster, Bishop's Stortford College

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EVANS, Christopher Chileot MRCS LRCP 1919–1927 (Col B, PA)

Died circa 1999 aged 89. He read Natural Sciences at Queens' College, Cambridge, and after a few years as a science master at Felsted School he returned there to study pre-clinical medical sciences, completing his medical studies at King's College, London. Qualifying in 1940 he worked at the evacuated Queens Square National Hospital for Nervous Diseases where, because of his background in physics and engineering, he was encouraged to operate Professor Adrian's historical apparatus to record electroencephalographs. He was thus one of the pioneers in the early clinical application of EEGs and was a founder member of the Electroencephalography Society in 1942. War service followed as a Surgeon Lieutenant in the Royal Navy on North Atlantic convoys and in Normandy soon after D-day. On demobilisation, he worked in the new EEG Department at the Maudsley Hospital and later at the Beaumont Hospital before his appointment as a Consultant at the Central Middlesex Hospital, where he remained until his retirement in 1973. His leisure interests included rebuilding vintage Bentley cars, sailing, and restoring houses. He lived for 45 years in a Georgian house where he encouraged classical musicians to stay and give concerts.

Consultant in clinical neurophysiology

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EVANS, Judy 1962–1969 (6's)

Plastic surgeon

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EVANS, Sydney (Almoner c1970s)

The Lutterworth Press offers Prisoners of Hope (£10.50), a collection of sermons and addresses 'of a high literary quality and great richness of spirituality' by the late Sydney Evans (Almoner c. 70s), Dean of Salisbury and of King's College, London.

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EVE, Charlotte 1980–1987 (1's, Col A)

Where are they now FOUND: Being sought by Juliana Matthews

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EVERARD, Thomas (CH circa 1730)

Mayor and public official, Williamsburg

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EWBANK, Heather 1960–1964 (5's, 8's)

Now Heather Day, teacher, editor, bibliographer

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EWING, Jon 1985–1992 (Th A, Th B)

Specialist in computer linguistics and Director of Operations for Mediasurface Software Development

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EXTON, Clive 1940–1945 (Brooks, Mid B)

Screenwriter

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FABBRI, Robert 1972–1979 (Mid B, Pe A)

Assistant director, film & television

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FABER, Ruth (Music teacher, Horsham, dates?)

Harpist

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FACEY, Sampson (CH early 1740s)

Settler in Jamaica

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FARLIE, The Rev Canon Hugh 1940–1948 (Th B)

Died on 10 May 2002 aged 72. He was house captain of Thornton B. After taking his BSc at London University, training at Lincoln Theological College and spending eight years as a curate (first in Bilston, West Midlands, then in Stoke Newington) Farlie was involved in student ministry in the eventful years from 1963-73, first as Assistant Chaplain at Bristol University and Chaplain of the Bristol College of Science and Technology, and then from 1965 as Chaplain of Bath University. He went on to serve for twenty-one years at the church of St Barnabas, Knowle, Bristol, initially as priest-in-charge but later as Vicar. Between 1989-94 he was an Honorary Canon of Bristol Cathedral. For some years he was the organiser of the Bath and West Old Blues. Retiring to Hastings he had permission to officiate in the diocese of Chichester. He was unmarried.

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FARMER, Simon 1980–1987 (Pe A)

Guitar designer. Founder, Gus Guitars

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FARNFIELD, David 1969–1976 (Mid A, Almoner)

Recruiter

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FARQUHAR-THOMSON, Robin 1969–1977 (Pe B)

Photographer

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FARQUHAR-THOMSON, Rupert 1966–1973 (Pe B)

In April a seventh novel by the critically acclaimed Rupert Thomson (R W Farquhar-Thomson, Pe B 66-73) will be published by Bloomsbury at £17.99. Divided Kingdom involves an eight-year-old boy who is removed from his home in the middle of the night and learns he is the victim of an extraordinary political experiment. It is 'a vision, a fable, a satire, a love story, a ghost story, a remarkable, genre-defying novel' that confirms Thomson as 'a writer of sublime prose who also has a mesmerising tale to tell.'

At the time of writing, Rupert Thomson (R W Farquhar-Thomson, Pe B 66-73) has had six novels published: Dreams of Leaving (1987), The Five Gates of Hell (1991), Air and Fire (1993), The Insult (1996), Soft (1998) and The Book of Revelation (1999). Critical acclaim has been consistent and his readership is increasing. The Book of Revelation (Bloomsbury, £12.99 hbk, £6.99 pbk) concerns a male ballet dancer abducted in Amsterdam by three sadistic masked women. 'A taut, controlled narrative that fuses high-grade suspense with an understated commentary on humanity, gender relations, and the meaning of degradation and humiliation. A challenging and compelling book that is well worth reading' (The Times, 8 July). Thomson is the subject of an entry in the new Oxford Companion to English Literature.

The appearance of Divided Kingdom (Bloomsbury, £17.99), a seventh novel by Rupert Thomson (R W Farquhar-Thomson, PB 66-73), led to an admiring interview in The Independent on April 1st. 'Since his debut in 1987, this elegant, silver-cropped former advertising copywriter has crafted a body of work so singular, flavoursome and captivating that you wonder why his fame has not yet matched his talent.' Imagining Britain divided into four strictly separate nations based on the medieval theory of the four Humours, 'the book mind-bendingly joins the mood of Little Britain to Nineteen Eighty-Four.'

Now Rupert Thomson, novelist

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FARR, George Henry (CH circa 1830)

Priest. Vice-Chancellor, University of Adelaide

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FARRANT, James 1960–1966 (Ma B, Mid A)

Facilitator, presenter & communications expert

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FARRANT, Madge A 1927–1934 (7's, Governor)

Died 10 October 2001

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FARRELL, Nigel 1962–1970 (Mid A)

Broadcaster & author

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FARRER, William 1853–1864 (CH)

Agriculturalist in Australia

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FAULKNER, William 1794–1800 (CH)

Lawyer

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FAWCETT, Andrew 1954–1961 (Col B)

Engineer and musician

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FAWCETT, Graham 1956–1964 (Th B)

Imagination and the Classical Inheritance in Literature (Guild of Pastoral Psychology, £3) is a published lecture by Graham Fawcett (Th B 56-64). A writer, broadcaster, teacher and linguist in Italian, he has worked principally for the Arvon Foundation, BBC Radio 3 and the Poetry School. He has translated Fellini's memoirs and the La Scala Encyclopaedia of Opera and teaches translation at Goldsmiths College, London.

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FAWDRY, Marguerite (Wife of Kenneth L Fawdry, Horsham Staff until 1949)

Founder, Pollock's Toy Museum

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FEEHALLY, John 1962–1969 (Ma A, Pe A)

John Feehally (Ma A, PA 62-69) is co-author with Richard J Johnson of Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology (Mosby, £155). The book was reviewed admiringly in The New England Journal of Medicine.

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FELIX JEYES, Billie 1978–1983 (3's)

Billie Felix Jeyes (3's 78-83) is an expert on the Greater Cincinnati area, and a new edition of her discriminating guidebook City Smart: Cincinnati is now available at $12.95.

Writer and journalist in the US

Her book, City Smart: Cincinnati

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FENNING, Christopher 1994–2001 (Pe B, Mid B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

His mountain-biking photos

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FENTON, Ollie 1982–1989 (?)

Where are they now FOUND: Being sought by Ash Whiting and Ewan Rubython

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FIELD, Barron (CH circa 1800)

Supreme Court Judge, Sydney. Published first book of poetry in Australia

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FIELD, Rebecca 1995–2002 (Ba A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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FIELDER, Sergeant Major (Horsham Staff 1940s)

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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FILSON, Sarah-Ann 1995–2002 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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FINLAY-NOTMAN, Harriet 1963–1971 (Hertford)

Where are they now: Who was at CH Hertford somewhere between 1963 to 1971. Being traced by Virginia Bignold

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FINNY, J D

Where are they now: Left CH in 1951 or 1952, being sought by Wendy Killner, the Administrator of the CH Association.

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FISH, Edmund 1980–1988 (Mid A)

Solicitor

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FISHER, Terence 1913–1919 (Pe B)

Film director

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FLAMSTEED, John (Governor circa 1700?)

Astronomer

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FLECKER, H L O 'Oily' 1930–1955 (Headmaster)

"Belated mention for a publication we missed in 1985. Beazley and Oxford edited by Donna Kurtz (Oxford University Committee for Archaeology Monograph 10) marked the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Sir John Beazley (11's, CA 1898-1903), Professor of Classical Archaeology and the man who revolutionised the study of Greek vase painting. It records the verdict of T E Lawrence: 'Beazley is a very wonderful fellow, who has written almost the best poems that ever came out of Oxford- If it hadn't been for that accursed Greek art, he'd have been a very fine poet.' He was a close friend of the poet James Elroy Flecker, brother of H L O Flecker (Headmaster 30-55). Among those thanked for helping to compile the book or mark the centenary are Peter Attenborough (MB 48-57, Almoner), Sir John Forsdyke (CH 1895-1902), Jasper Griffin (PA 48-56) and Roy Salisbury (TB 40-46, Officer 46-86, Clerk 71-86, Governor).

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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Fleming, Alan 1945–1954 (Mid A)

It is with great sadness that his family announce the death of Alan in East Surrey Hospital, after a short battle with cancer. He was a pupil at C.H. from 45 – 54, where classics were his main area of study, under the tutelage of D. S. Macnutt. He eventually became a Classical Grecian and Deputy Head Boy. He was also a prize-winning student of German.

In addition to his academic interests Alan was an enthusiastic sportsman, being a player of both rugby and cricket. He was also a keen gymnast and high-jumper. In his last year at the school he took part in the first production by the Horsham G&S Society and this was an interest which was to last through his life. In 1954 Alan was awarded a John Watson Scholarship to read Classics at Brasenose College, Oxford, graduating in 1958.

Having decided to become a teacher, Alan studied for his Dip.Ed. at Newcastle, taking up his first teaching post at Holloway School in London in 1959. While there he became more interested in physical education and subsequently undertook a Diploma at Loughborough College, as it then was, and became a P.E. specialist. He obtained a post at Ifield School, in Crawley, West Sussex, and the following year became head of the PE department, though still occasionally teaching academic subjects. For some years he was a keen cricketer, playing for a local village team in the summer months, and in squash matches during the winter.

During his 27 years at Ifield he was an enthusiastic supporter of various musical events, taking part in many productions, including some of his own adaptations for the stage, including works by Dickens and Browning.

However, he never lost his enthusiasm for languages, particularly his love of Ancient Greek, while also learning several modern languages. In addition, he taught himself Modern Greek, which he then went on to teach for many years in Adult Education classes. In these he used his own textbook, with great success.

He is survived by his widow, Barbara, five children and eight grandchildren.

Contributed by Barbara Fleming

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FLEMING, Jessica 1995–2002 (Ba B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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FLEMING, Neil 1982–1982 (Staff)

Staff

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FLEMYNG, Jason 1978–1983 (Ma B, Mid A)

Film actor

His filmography in the Internet Movie Database

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FLETCHER, Alan 1941–1948 (Mid B)

The distinguished designer Alan Fletcher (Mid B 1941-48) died on 21 September 2006 aged 74.

An exhibition entitled Alan Fletcher: 50 Years at Work (and Play) opens on November 11 at the Design Museum, London, to coincide with publication of his book Picturing and Poeting.

Alan Fletcher (Mid B 41-48) recently produced The Art of Looking Sideways (Phaidon, £24.95). 'One of Britain's best designers,' The Times said on 18 August, 'Fletcher has amassed anecdotes, quotations and images in 72 chapters over 533 pages. The juxtaposition of these items is not only witty, but sensually appealing.'

Alan's obituary in The Guardian

Designer

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FLETCHER, Dr. Geoffrey Charles 1932–1938

Dr. Geoffrey Fletcher on the occasion of the award of his PhD, London, 1953THE LATE DR. GEOFFREY CHARLES FLETCHER, 26.3.1922 – 11.11.2006

The funeral of Geoff Fletcher was held at St John’s Anglican Church, in the Melbourne suburb of Wantirna South, on Friday 17 November, 2006. It was attended by a large congregation, comprising his family, friends, neighbours, academic colleagues from Monash University, and two Housey and one Hertford Old Blues.

He entered Christ’s Hospital in 1932, and left in 1938, for further secondary schooling at Upper Latymer in London. After a short spell in the public service, Geoff was called up into the RAF, in 1941. He trained in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) as a navigator, and was posted to Bomber Command’s colloquially named 'Ghost Squadron’, so many of its crew having been shot down. Himself a Flight Lieutenant, he was shot down over Germany a fortnight after his 21st birthday, and was sent to Stalag Luft 3 PoW camp. There he honed his wood-working skills in transforming bed boards into tunnel props for the famed 'Great Escape’. He was Number 117, in numerical order of those due to go along the tunnel when completed. He was among the fortunate ones, for the first fifty to break free were caught – and shot by the Germans, who of course dismantled the tunnel. Perhaps we can conjecture that Geoff learnt the rudiments of woodwork in the CH 'Manual School’, and his early knowledge of science from Mr Kirby in the 'Science School’.

Incarcerated with Australians, he decided that his future would be in Australia. After repatriation Geoff remained a member of the RAFVR until 1953.

Post-war, Geoff obtained his BSc with 1st Class Honours in Physics in 1948 and 1st Class Honours in Mathematics, in 1949, at Imperial College of Science and Technology, London University, and the post-graduate DIC in Mathematics in 1950. There followed post-graduate research in Solid State Theory, initially at Imperial College and subsequently at University College of the South West (now Exeter University) where, as an Assistant Lecturer (and then Lecturer) he received his PhD in 1953. He remained on the staff at Exeter as a Lecturer in Applied Mathematics until 1957, when having met and married Jeanne, he emigrated to Australia to take up a Senior Lectureship in Applied Mathematics at the University of Sydney.

From 1957 for eight years he remained in this position, forming close links with colleagues in the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Organisation, Division of Applied Physics, at that time located in the grounds of Sydney University. He also spent a time in work for the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in Pittsburgh, to do some experimentation on silicon carbide.

In 1965 he was appointed Senior Lecturer, in the Department of Physics at Melbourne’s Monash University.

The list of subjects on which Geoff lectured in Exeter, Sydney or Monash is long and highly scientific: classical mechanics, wave motion, quantum mechanics, electricity, magnetism, solid state theory, relativity, calculus of variations and gravitational potential theory… Throughout his career, his research was concerned with the theory of electrons in solids and his early paper concerning the electronic structure of nickel (published in the Proceedings of the Physical Society of London) has received 180 citations in internationally peer-reviewed literature. He was also noted for his interactions with experimental physicists measuring the properties of solids.

In the course of his busy life Geoff wrote one book, The Electron Band Theory of Solids (North Holland, 1971), and twenty-seven publications in refereed journals.

Geoff retired early, aged sixty-one, and a Monash symposium was later held in honour of his 70th birthday. Its title was Electrons in Solids, The 1990s and beyond, and the papers presented were subsequently published as a special edition of The Australian Journal of Physics. In the preface to this edition, three academic colleagues wrote: `…we would like to express our appreciation to a highly respected colleague and to an individual of great humanity.’

Apart from his life’s work, Geoff was a keen singer, and his special love was to partake in Gilbert and Sullivan. He founded at least one church choir. Decades earlier, at CH, he was a member of the chapel choir, and at seventeen was part of a jazz band, in which he played a banjo ukulele.

Though I personally knew Geoff from the mid-1960s, when he first joined the Victorian Society of Blues, I knew little of his wide accomplishments. Although Geoff rarely missed any of our twice-yearly VSB gatherings, we remained unaware of another hobby of his, of writing stories. Years after the war he won the first prize in the Sir Edward “Weary” Dunlop Memorial Award, for a 'True War Experience', as well as other awards for his stories.

As one Monash professor has remarked, Geoff appeared unwilling to talk about his achievements because people would not be interested!

He is survived by his wife Jeanne, and the close-knit family of two daughters and seven grandchildren.

Ralph McDonell,

Former President of the Victorian Society of Blues, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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FLETCHER, Peter R 1961–1968 (Col B)

Anaesthetist

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FLEW, R Newton 1897–1905 (Wd 7, Pe A)

Methodist leader

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FLIPPANCE, Norman 1932–1938 (Ma A)

Now Norman Hillyer, priest, scholar & author

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FLORENTIN, Dave 1999–2001 (Pe A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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FLYNN, Peter 1959–1960 (ColB)

Where are they now FOUND: After returning to the States from a year of student exchange at Christ's Hospital, Peter earned a BA from Harvard College in 1963 and an LL.B from Yale Law School in 1966. After a stint in the Peace Corps in West Africa, he moved to Illinois and embarked on the practice of law. In 1999 he was appointed to a judgeship and am still a judge, hearing chancery cases. He currently lives and works in Illinois.

Email contact

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FORD, Benedict 1995–2002 (Ma B, Mid A, Pe B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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FORREST, William Ivon Norman 1923–1931 (Ba A)

William Ivon Norman Forrest (BA 23-31) died recently. He went from CH to Guy's Hospital, where he studied dentistry and spent a year as dental house surgeon before enlisting in the Royal Navy in 1937 as a Surgeon Lieutenant (D). He rose steadily, becoming a Surgeon Captain (D) in 1960 and a Surgeon Rear-Admiral (D) in 1968, the year of his appointment as Director of Naval Dental Services at the Ministry of Defence, a post he held until 1971. He was appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath in 1970. His recreations, as listed in Who's Who, were golf, gardening, photography and (latterly) 'bewilderment'.

In 1942 he married Mary Margaret McMordie Black; they had three sons.

Director, Naval Dental Services

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FORSDYKE, Sir John 1895–1902 (Wd 14)

"Belated mention for a publication we missed in 1985. Beazley and Oxford edited by Donna Kurtz (Oxford University Committee for Archaeology Monograph 10) marked the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Sir John Beazley (11's, CA 1898-1903), Professor of Classical Archaeology and the man who revolutionised the study of Greek vase painting. It records the verdict of T E Lawrence: 'Beazley is a very wonderful fellow, who has written almost the best poems that ever came out of Oxford- If it hadn't been for that accursed Greek art, he'd have been a very fine poet.' He was a close friend of the poet James Elroy Flecker, brother of H L O Flecker (Headmaster 30-55). Among those thanked for helping to compile the book or mark the centenary are Peter Attenborough (MB 48-57, Almoner), Sir John Forsdyke (CH 1895-1902), Jasper Griffin (PA 48-56) and Roy Salisbury (TB 40-46, Officer 46-86, Clerk 71-86, Governor).

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FORWARD, Ian 1955–1962 (Pe A)

Business Name: Goldprint Owner : Ian Forward (Peele A 1955 -1962) [Note: retired from Army in 1992 and started Goldprint]

Address : Snowdon House, Gold Street, Stalbridge, Dorset DT10 2LX

Tel/Fax : 01963 363930 Email : ian.forward@tiscali.co.uk

Provider of : Letterheads : Invoices (incl. NCR sets) : Business Cards (incl. plastic) : Fliers : Booklets : CVs : Personal & Wedding Stationery : Laminating : (A4 full colour work available, with some limitations)

Artwork & Design done in-house. Can accept pdf files via Email. No VAT (not registered). 10% Discount for Old Blues.

Fast turnround : Despatch at Royal Mail cost.

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FOULKES, Nicholas 1976–1983 (Th B)

In Last of the Dandies: The Scandalous Life and Escapades of the Count d'Orsay (Little, Brown, £20), Nick Foulkes (Th B 76-83) examines 'one of history's most colourful, flamboyant, raffish and scandalous of characters'. No mean dandy himself, Foulkes writes regularly for the Financial Times, Country Life, High Life and the Mail on Sunday and was shortlisted for last year's Habano Man Award for communication, recognising his outstanding contribution to the cigar industry.

Author & journalist

His 2003 book, Last of the Dandies

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Founder's Day Dinner, 2005

Photos of the 2005 Founder's Day Dinner

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FOX, Glenn 1981–1988 (Mid A)

Infrastructure finance specialist

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FOX, Natasha 1995–2002 (Col B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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FOX, Sir Cyril 1895–1899 (Wd 1)

Archaeologist. Director, National Museum of Wales

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FRAMPTON, H J 1910–1916 (Mid A)

Colonial administrator

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Frank Brangwyn murals in CH Chapel article

The Frank Brangwyn murals in CH Chapel

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FRANKLIN, Henry 1914–1920 (Th A)

Cricketer. Headmaster, Epsom College

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FRANKLIN, Ronald "Peter" 1916–1921 (Th A)

Cricketer

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Fraser-Gausden , Toby 1993–2000 (Pe B,Mid A)

FOUND: Currently working for the Allegis Group, the world’s largest IT staffing consultancy as Business Development Manager along with Tom Jeremy (ThB / MidA ,93-2000)and Charlie George (LaB/PeA 92 – 99). All are working presently in the London office.

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FREEMAN, Claire 1995–2002 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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FRIEND, Dr Gerald 1913–1946 (Horsham Medical Officer)

This may be well known but was news to me: the composer, conductor, broadcaster and journalist Jonah Barrington (Cyril Dalmaine, Horsham Staff 25-30) produced an autobiography (And Master of None, Walter Edwards, 1948) in which he wrote of CH with huge admiration. His portrait of William Hamilton Fyfe (Headmaster 19-30) is instantly recognisable. 'He ruled this vast virile community ... with a velvet glove entirely innocent of any hidden mailed fist. His only disciplinary weapon was an outrageous and awful and irrepressible sense of humour..... He was the true democrat, and Christ's Hospital the true democracy.' Among outstanding staff were Tony Kitson (dates?) 'who played golf as elegantly as he played the organ', Twinkle Wilkinson (02-29) 'who had a genius for making boys sing in tune' and Dr Friend (Medical Officer until 1946) 'who cured me of boils and all shyness in matters appertaining to the body (he would bark the most intimate instructions at the top of his voice)'. Barrington staged orchestral concerts 'on the slightest provocation', causing much upheaval. 'Fyfe approved, turned up to every concert, and shielded me from the slings and arrows of outraged housemasters.' All the key components of CH are still there, Barrington says, 'and if ever I had a son I would move heaven and earth to see he were there too.' In earlier days at the Royal College of Music, he and Constant Lambert (CA 14-22) - 'a brilliant young modernist with a limp' - were two of the three candidates for the Mendelssohn composition scholarship. Neither won.

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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FRODSHAM, Charles 1818–1824 (CH)

Chronometer maker

Portrait

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FYFE, Sir William Hamilton 1919–1930 (Headmaster)

This may be well known but was news to me: the composer, conductor, broadcaster and journalist Jonah Barrington (Cyril Dalmaine, Horsham Staff 25-30) produced an autobiography (And Master of None, Walter Edwards, 1948) in which he wrote of CH with huge admiration. His portrait of William Hamilton Fyfe (Headmaster 19-30) is instantly recognisable. 'He ruled this vast virile community ... with a velvet glove entirely innocent of any hidden mailed fist. His only disciplinary weapon was an outrageous and awful and irrepressible sense of humour..... He was the true democrat, and Christ's Hospital the true democracy.' Among outstanding staff were Tony Kitson (dates?) 'who played golf as elegantly as he played the organ', Twinkle Wilkinson (02-29) 'who had a genius for making boys sing in tune' and Dr Friend (Medical Officer until 1946) 'who cured me of boils and all shyness in matters appertaining to the body (he would bark the most intimate instructions at the top of his voice)'. Barrington staged orchestral concerts 'on the slightest provocation', causing much upheaval. 'Fyfe approved, turned up to every concert, and shielded me from the slings and arrows of outraged housemasters.' All the key components of CH are still there, Barrington says, 'and if ever I had a son I would move heaven and earth to see he were there too.' In earlier days at the Royal College of Music, he and Constant Lambert (CA 14-22) - 'a brilliant young modernist with a limp' - were two of the three candidates for the Mendelssohn composition scholarship. Neither won.

Two more posthumous books from the monk and mystic Bede Griffiths (A R Griffiths, PB, BB 19-25). Arthur James and Medio Media have published The Mystery Beyond: On Retreat With Bede Griffiths (£5.99), and John Swindells has edited A Human Search: Bede Griffiths Reflects On His Life: An Oral History (Burns & Oates, £8.50) in which seven pages are devoted to his CH years. On being a Grecian: 'I remember somebody saying that I went about the school as though I owned the place.' Griffiths, Frank Root (CH c. 19-25) and the future Foreign Secretary Michael Stewart (LA 18-25) became pacifists under Tolstoy's influence, refused promotion in the Officer Training Corps and were released from it entirely by William Hamilton Fyfe (Headmaster 19-30), 'a very wonderful person'. Later they were Oxford Socialists together.

Principal, Queen's University, Ontario, & Aberdeen University

His 1932 address

His translation of Aristotle's

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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GALE, Jeremy 1994–1999 (La B, Th A)

Where are they now: Being traced by Anthony Hart

Student, Aberystwyth University

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GAMLIN, Linda 1962–1969 (3's)

A trained biochemist and acknowledged expert on allergic diseases, Linda Gamlin (3's 62-69) is the author of The Allergy Bible: The definitive guide to understanding, diagnosing and treating allergies and intolerances (Quadrille, £12.99), described by OK magazine as 'practical, straightforward advice for sufferers and their families.'

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GAMMON, Rupert 1976–1982 (Col A)

Sustainable energy technology specialist

Photo

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GARNER, Julian 1967–1975 (Th A)

Dramatist.

Two plays by Julian Garner (Th A 67-75) - 'a master storyteller' (Sunday Times), 'a writer of enormous integrity' (Guardian) - have been published: Silent Engine (Oberon, £7.99) and A Giant's Giant Pizza (Samuel French, £5.25). The latter began life as an impromptu bedtime story for Julian's daughters and was premiered in Norway in 1998; the former was staged last year in Edinburgh and London.

His play Cyril's Little Moments of Weakness and Strength, with Jeffrey Mayhew (Staff 1997- ) in the title role

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GAUNTLETT, Louise 1995–2002 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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GEALL, Chantal 1977–1984 (2's)

Where are they now FOUND: Chantal Geall, Head of FI Credit Portfolio, Royal Bank of Scotland. Now living in Hertford.

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GEIDT, Oli 1996–2003 (Th B, Gr W)

Russian & German student, University College London

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GEORGE, Andrew 1965–1972 (La A)

The new Penguin Classics edition of The Epic of Gilgamesh (£7.99) includes the fullest translation yet of the Babylonian epic and relevant fragments, plus, for the first time in one place in English, the text of all the five Sumerian poems from which it derives. The translator is Andrew George (La A 65-72), Reader in Assyriology at London University's School of Oriental and African Studies. He began teaching there in 1983 and is also an Honorary Lecturer at the university's Institute of Archaeology. His research has taken him to Iraq to visit Babylon and other ancient sites, and to museums in Baghdad, Europe, and North America to read the original clay tablets on which the ancient scribes wrote. He has published extensively on Babylonian literature and religion.

Head of Department of Languages & Cultures of the Near & Middle East, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London

His translation of the Epic of Gilgamesh

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George, Charlie 1993–2000 (La B,Pe A)

FOUND: Currently working for the Allegis Group, the world’s largest IT staffing consultancy as Business Development Manager along with Tom Jeremy (Thorn.B / Mid.A ,93-2000)and Toby Fraser-Gausden (Peele.B / Mid.A,93-2000). All are working presently in the London office.

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GERRISH, Laurence (Horsham Staff 1938-40, 1947-48)

Musician

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GIBBS, Simon 83–90 (Ma A, Ma B)

Simon Gibbs is a partner at defendant law costs draftsmen and consultants Gibbs Wyatt Stone. He regularly has articles printed in the legal and insurance press and is a frequent speaker on legal costs at industry and training conferences. He is co-author of Claims Handling: Law and Practice – A Practitioner's Guide and writes the online Legal Costs Blog. He acted as an expert witness in the field of the legal costs industry in the case of Andrew Reid v Capita Group.

Email Simon Gibbs, write to him at Gibbs Wyatt Stone, 68 Clarendon Drive, London, SW15 1AH, telephone: 020-7096-0937 or fax: 0207-096-0954

Legal Costs Blog

Gibbs Wyatt Stone website

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GIELGUD, Piers 1974–1981 (Col B, Dance/drama teacher 1988-89)

Choreographer

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GILBERT, Rowena 1991–1998 (LH B, LH A)

Ceramic Artist (and Freelance Web Designer)

www.rowenagilbert.com

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GILBERT, Walter 1994–2001 (La B, Ma A, Gr E)

Student, Teesside University

His details on Grecians 2001

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GILES, Ernest 1845–1850 (CH)

In The Explorers: Epic First-Hand Accounts of Exploration in Australia (Phoenix, £8.99), Tim Flannery describes Ernest Giles (CH 1845-50) as 'one of the most audacious and eloquent explorers in the history of the continent' and offers eleven pages of Giles's Australia Twice Traversed, including a desperate moment when he eats a dying baby wallaby, bones and all.

Explorer

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GILLESPIE, Simon 1970–1977 (Col A)

Head of Operations, the Healthcare Commission

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GILLINGHAM, Lt Cdr William Anthony RNVR (Retd), DSC (Horsham Staff 1939)

Died on 2 March 2002, aged 84. He spent a single term at CH at the outbreak of World War Two. Appointed directly from Worcester College, Oxford (where he had been exactly contemporary with Woodrow Wyatt), he was junior housemaster of Coleridge B under A H Buck (CA 1910-19, Horsham Staff 1920s-57). In March 1940 the Col B house notes lamented: 'As a rule we are not unpatriotic, but at the moment we have rather a grudge against the navy for claiming Mr Gillingham during last holidays and giving his pan-pipes to the bosun. After all that he did for us in his first term we feel his loss very much indeed, and can only hope that the flying visit he paid us during this term will be often repeated in the future.' After the war he taught at Bedales, retiring to Redruth, Cornwall.

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GLEESON, Cara 1995–2002 (Col A, Hertford, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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GLENNIE, David D 1940–1946 (Pe B)

Where are they now: Being traced by Anthony Hart

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GLOCK, Sir William 1919–1928 (Ba B)

Tainted by Experience: A Life in the Arts (Faber & Faber, £25) is a spirited autobiography by Sir John Drummond, the former head of BBC music, Radio 3 and the Proms. He writes admiringly of his predecessor Sir William Glock (Ba B 19-26/8), the architect Nicholas Thompson (Pe B 45-52), the conductor Sir Colin Davis (Th B 38-44) and Patrick Deuchar (La A 59-66) who transformed the Albert Hall. BBC Director General Sir Ian Trethowan (Ma A 33-38) pops up fleetingly, a dark-suited, watch-chained figure beside his vast, bald, kaftan-and-beads-wearing Chairman, George Howard.

BBC Controller of Music

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GLOSTER-SMITH, John 1974–1975 (Horsham Staff)

Facilitator & coach

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GLOUCESTER, HRH Henry, Duke of 1937–1974 (President)

President

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GLOUCESTER, HRH Princess Alice, Duchess of (Mother of our President, wife of his predecessor)

Information

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GLOUCESTER, HRH Richard, Duke of 1974–1974 (President)

President

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GODDEN, Jimmy (CH circa 1890)

Actor

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GODDEN-KENT, Peter 1948–1955 (Ma B)

RAMC soldier/Admin Officer 1960-76 (and TA 1990-97); NHS in Wales 1976-88; Civil Servant in Welsh Office 1988-95; Essex Social Services 1996-2002; Non-Executive Director, Witham Braintree & Halstead NHS Care Trust Oct 2002 to Sep 2006; Independent Living Advocate (for people with any form of disability) 2002-06; Help the Aged "Expert by Experience" 2006-08; Salvation Army Housing Association Support Worker 2007 to date; Ambulance Service in Essex volunteer "First Responder" Oct 2005 to date.

Peter can be contacted at petergoddenkent@yahoo.co.uk or by telephone; 07775 834824.

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GODFREY, Thomas 1977–1983 (Mid B)

Chief Executive Officer, Activate UK

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GOLDNEY, Sir Gabriel 1820–1828 (CH, Governor)

MP for Chippenham

Vanity Fair caricature

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GOLDSMITH, Tom 1995–2000 (Pe B)

Where are they now: Amy Leadbeater (Ba B 2000-01, Gr W 2001-2002) wants to get in contact with Tom who was in Peele B until he left half way through his Deps (2000/01).

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GONCALVES, Eddie 1979–1986 (Mid A)

Where are they now: Was at CH 1979-1986 (ish). Last heard of heading for Portugal to set up a farm in the mountains near Lisbon. He used to work for CND and wrote for the Guardian. Being traced by Maria Grogan (6's and Ba B 1981-1987)

Journalist & campaigner

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GOODCHILD, David 1986–1993 (Pe B, Pe A)

Where are they now: Was in Pe A and Pe B 1986-1993. Lived in Tower Hill, London E1 and may be working for Ernst and Young

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GOODIN, Tanya 1976–1983 (6's)

Founder & CEO, Tamar (internet solutions)

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GOODMAN, Samuel (Said to have been a CH Master in the 17th Century)

Request for information about him:

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GOODSIR, Jane (Hertford, dates?)

Lifelong Learning - Open Learning - Distance Learning (European Distance Education Network) contains contributions by at least two OBs. Jane Goodsir (Hertford, dates?) writes on education and training in the UK drugs service, while Sir John Daniel (MdA 52-61) examines the use of new media in distance education and looks at the 'mega-universities'.

Social policy analyst

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GOODWIN, Harry (Horsham Staff 1902-30, & again in WW2)

Cricketer

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GORE, Sir John 1634–1936 (President)

Lord Mayor of London

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GORNALL, James 1911–1917 (Mid A)

Cricketer. Captain, Royal Navy

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GORTON, Christopher Conrad (CH 1960s)

Died in 1998. A banker, he was survived by his wife Moira and their sons Ian and Martin.

Banker

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GOUGH, Sydney John (CH circa 1898)

Civil servant & toastmaster

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GOWER, John 1978–1985 (Th A)

Shipbroker

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GOWING, Margaret 1932–1938 (Elliott, 4's)

The select bibliography in Lorna Arnold's Britain and the H-Bomb (Palgrave, £45 hbk, £15.99 pbk) includes two works by the late Margaret Gowing (Elliott, 4's 32-38), Britain and Atomic Energy 1939-45 and Independence and Deterrence: Britain and Atomic Energy 1945-52.

Historian of science

Career review

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GRAHAM, Alice 1995–2002 (Col B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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GRANT, Elizabeth 2000–2002 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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GRANT, Joseph 1995–2002 (La B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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GRANT, Mike 1973–1979 (LH B, Pe B)

Mike is now Editor of The Plantsman.

RHS Publications Ltd, Churchgate, New Road, Peterborough PE1 1TT, UK

T 01733 775782 F 01733 775819

E mike.grant@rhspublications.co.uk

W http://www.rhs.org.uk/plantsman

Botanist

Society borne or bred: Plants discovered or bred by the Royal Horticultural Society

'Wallflowers: Back on the dance floor'

'Cannas: a feast of flowers and foliage'

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GRAY, Adrian 1968–1975 (Mid B)

Murder, robbery, riots and terrorism all feature in a recent book by Adrian Gray (Mid B 68-75). Crime on the Line (Atlantic Publishers, £12.99) is described as 'a rollicking good read - thoroughly recommended to anyone who thinks that the only risk to you when travelling on the railways is from cracked rails. Adrian Gray knows his subject and looks at every conceivable form of railway crime supporting his story with numerous cases from history.'

Another book of railway history from Adrian Gray (Mid B 68-75): South Eastern and Chatham Railways: A Marriage of Convenience (Middleton Press, £14.95). Also by Adrian is Lincolnshire Privies: A Nostalgic Trip Down The Garden Path (Countryside Books, £7.95).

Schools inspector & author

Book, Tales of Old Bedfordshire

Book, Tales of Old Lincolnshire - scroll down

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GRAY, Louis Harold 1918–1924 (Ma B, Ba B)

In The Blue for Michaelmas Term 2001 I suggested that a new CH boarding house might be named after the physicist and radiologist Louis Harold (Hal) Gray (MB, BB 18-24). As a result I received an unexpected letter from his son Crispin, a senior figure in Cambridge's 'Silicon Fen'. 'My father would have been deeply honoured by this proposal, as would my mother and as am I.' Through this letter and subsequent emails I learnt more about Hal Gray's lifelong connection with Christ's Hospital.

Hal was particularly close to his father Harry, a telegraphist at Mount Pleasant who was very outgoing and sociable but also 'had very strong principles and was a conscientious objector during the Great War, which must have demanded great courage in those illiberal times.'

Another important mentor - Gray often said he owed him everything - was the legendary CH head of science, Chas E Browne (Newgate Street & Horsham Staff 1899-1926). He taught by asking questions, adopting (as he put it) 'the attitude of a co-inquirer, not an authority' and encouraging pupils to suspend judgement and avoid hasty conclusions based on too little evidence. His methods worked: five of his boys were elected Fellows of the Royal Society. One of them was Gray, who has been called 'the Fellow who fathered radiobiology'.

A 1926 letter from Browne to Gray's mother expresses gratitude for a card index holder, 'the admiration of all who see it', which Gray had made and presented to the school. 'Harold is the kindest-hearted lad I have ever come across - to say nothing of his genius for doing things well. I am sure there is a big future before him and I am sure the school will one day treasure as a public possession, this splendid piece of workmanship of a famous Old Blue.' (Where is it now?)

Crispin Gray met Chas E Browne just before his death. 'He was very knowledgeable about what Barnes Wallis [CH 1900-04, his most renowned ex-pupil] was up to and told me many things which I probably should not have known - in particular to note how the MoD had painted out the details of the bouncing bombs in the film The Dam Busters because the fact that the bombs spun backwards was still secret!'

From CH Hal Gray went up to Trinity College, Cambridge, and became a researcher at the Cavendish Laboratory when many celebrated discoveries in nuclear physics were being made there. In 1929, in the words of Dr Sinclair Wynchank (BA 48-57), 'he achieved international recognition with a discovery now called the Bragg-Gray principle. It is a basis for measuring what happens when X-rays or nuclear radiations fall on someone. Besides warning us about the dangers, this principle can permit the successful planning of many cancer treatments and also suggest the best way to take X-ray pictures. Each one of us has therefore benefited from Gray's work.'

In 1932 he married Freye Picot, reputedly the first blind woman to graduate from Cambridge. They spent their honeymoon at CH, 'in a small cottage by the railway line, which probably still exists.' Freye was a cousin of Eunice Beavan, wife of Paul Beavan (Horsham Staff 34, 39-70), and consequently Hal, Freye and their sons often stayed at the school, which Freye always enjoyed because she was used to its layout. 'For many years it was a summer ritual to go to Horsham for Beating Retreat, the end of year play and the school concert. I think of the Brangwyn murals every time I hear Mozart's Sinfonia Concertante.' Of Paul Beavan himself, Crispin writes: 'All I remember about Paul was that he was called 'Boss' because of his glass eye, and that he collected the boys' empty toothpaste tubes to melt down and machine into fittings for his cameras!'

Gray spent most of his career at the Hammersmith and Mount Vernon hospitals, where his teams did pioneering work in radiobiology and conducted important studies of cancer treatment, cell reproduction and much more. 'What fun it all was,' one colleague recalled. 'The tea-party discussions ... were immensely stimulating. Hal's famous laugh echoed through the building.' Another recalled him as 'a most marvellous man to work with, with a tremendous sense of fun'.

Crispin emphasises two of his father's traits. 'He loved making things - the more intricate and delicate, the better. Whenever possible he made his own equipment himself, including an X-ray tube (now in the Gray Cancer Institute) and one of the very first neutron generators. He even made his first laboratory himself out of wooden panels and trusses intended for a large prefabricated hen-house. It was unheated throughout the bitter winters of the 1940s, but my father was impervious to cold. He told me that he had learned to ignore cold in the Housey dormitory.'

He was noted too for 'his almost total selflessness. No idea was too stupid to be considered carefully in case it might just have some hidden merit; no appeal for help, however apparently undeserving or even fraudulent, went unanswered. This is not just hagiography - his generosity often drove his colleagues, and my mother, to despair.' (He sounds a true successor of an earlier Cambridge OB, Joshua Barnes (CH 1656-71), who 'gave his only coat to a poor fellow that begged at his door.')

This selflessness attracted great generosity in others, including a man who for many years precision machined Gray's instruments for him without charge. A more celebrated benefactor was his colleague Sir Oliver Scott, who at Hammersmith Hospital (as he later wrote) 'become persuaded that Hal Gray was an authentic genius' and who therefore built the first Gray Laboratory at Mount Vernon Hospital using his personal money after Gray left Hammersmith. Says Crispin, 'The Scott Building - now vastly extended - and the Scott-Fowler Library at the Gray Cancer Institute are a memorial to Sir Oliver's continuing support for my father's work.'

Image of Louis Harold Gray

Lewis Harold Gray

Gray died in 1965. In his Will he left the bulk of his estate to Freye (who survived him) but with a proviso that it should go to CH if he outlived her.

In the Eighties he was posthumously honoured by having his name chosen for a scientific unit, concerned with radiation.

Crispin Gray says of his father: He always held the school in very high regard... He never did forget the benefits he had received at Christ's Hospital, and consciously tried to pay them back through his research. I think posterity has judged that he succeeded.

Physicist, radiologist

Chronology

The Gray Cancer Institute website, including a chronology of his life, achievements and distinctions.

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Great Hall, The. Christ's Hospital, Newgate Street

The Great Hall, Christ's Hospital Delivery of the Annual Orations

London: Published for the Proprietor by J. Mead, 10, Gough Square, Fleet Street

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GREEN, CA (Tony) 1946–1952 (Ma A, La B)

Died 13 June 2004.

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GREEN, Kenneth 1918–1922 (Pe B)

Artist

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GREEN, Neil 1995–2002 (La B, Ma A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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GREEN, The Blessed Hugh (CH circa 1600)

Catholic martyr

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GREENFIELD, Jessica 1994–2001 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

Photo

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GREENFIELD, Oliver 1995–2002 (Pe B, Pe A, Pe B, Gr?)

Details on Big Grecian website

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GREENHALGH, Amy 1994–2001 (Col A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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GREENHILL, Sir George (Alfred) (CH circa 1860)

Military mathematician

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GREGG-SMITH, Gerard 1970–1976 (Ma B, Col B)

Gerard is MD of GGS Associates which provides senior executive search globally in: Health Care & Life Sciences and Financial Services.

Telephone: +44 20 8876 9232 or email ggs@ggsassociates.com

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GREGORY, Audrey 1937–1944 ((Griggs), 5's)

Away from the Bombs and the Boys: Christ's Hospital Girls' School in Wartime

'A fascinating and entertaining memoir, of both a time and a place that were unique.' 'She has an extraordinarily vivid and very detailed memory - I thoroughly enjoyed reading this excellent book.'

Requests for copies may be emailed to administrator@chassociation.org or posted to: Wendy Killner, The Christ's Hospital Association (CHA), Christ's Hospital, Horsham, West Sussex RH13 OYP.

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GREGORY, Don 1939–1948 (Pe A)

Wrote "Christ's Hospital: The War Years" in August 2003.

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GREGORY, Eliot 1995–2002 (Th B, Mid B, Gr?)

Actor & model

Details on Big Grecian website

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GREGORY, Julian 1995–2002 (La B, Mid B, Gr?)

Actor & model

Details on Big Grecian website

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GREGORY, Leo (CH circa 1998)

Actor

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GREGORY, Ryan 1995–2002 (Ma B, Mid B, Gr?)

Actor & model

Details on Big Grecian website

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GREIG, Kenneth 1987–1993 (Staff)

Until recently Headmaster, Pangbourne College

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GRENIER, Matthew 1976–1983 (La B)

International human rights specialist

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GRIBBLE, Michael 1934–1942 (Col A, Governor)

Pathologist

Email him here

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GRIFFIN, Jasper 1948–1956 (Pe A)

Belated mention for a publication we missed in 1985. Beazley and Oxford edited by Donna Kurtz (Oxford University Committee for Archaeology Monograph 10) marked the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Sir John Beazley (11's, Col A 1898-1903), Professor of Classical Archaeology and the man who revolutionised the study of Greek vase painting. It records the verdict of T E Lawrence: 'Beazley is a very wonderful fellow, who has written almost the best poems that ever came out of Oxford- If it hadn't been for that accursed Greek art, he'd have been a very fine poet.' He was a close friend of the poet James Elroy Flecker, brother of H L O Flecker (Headmaster 30-55). Among those thanked for helping to compile the book or mark the centenary are Peter Attenborough (Ma B 48-57, Almoner), Sir John Forsdyke (CH 1895-1902), Jasper Griffin (Pe A 48-56) and Roy Salisbury (Th B 40-46, Officer 46-86, Clerk 71-86, Governor).

Jasper Griffin (Pe A 48-56) has edited, and contributed to, Sophocles Revisited: Essays Presented to Sir Hugh Lloyd-Jones (OUP, £48). The index contains an entry for 'griffin, fabulous creature of gaudy appearance'. His earlier book Snobs has been reissued as The Art of Snobbery (Robinson Publishing, £3.99).

Classicist. Public Orator, Oxford University

His speeches at the ceremony to admit and install Chris Patten as Chancellor, 2003

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GRIFFITHS, Bede 1919–1925 (Pe B, Ba B)

Two more posthumous books from the monk and mystic Bede Griffiths (A R Griffiths, PB, BB 19-25). Arthur James and Medio Media have published The Mystery Beyond: On Retreat With Bede Griffiths (£5.99), and John Swindells has edited A Human Search: Bede Griffiths Reflects On His Life: An Oral History (Burns & Oates, £8.50) in which seven pages are devoted to his CH years. On being a Grecian: 'I remember somebody saying that I went about the school as though I owned the place.' Griffiths, Frank Root (CH c. 19-25) and the future Foreign Secretary Michael Stewart (LA 18-25) became pacifists under Tolstoy's influence, refused promotion in the Officer Training Corps and were released from it entirely by William Hamilton Fyfe (Headmaster 19-30), 'a very wonderful person'. Later they were Oxford Socialists together.

Benedictine mystic and author

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GRIFFITHS, Dr Michael 1938–1946 (Col B, Mid B)

Dr Michael Griffiths (Mid B 38-46), who served with the Overseas Missionary Fellowship in Japan and as its General Director before becoming Principal of the London Bible College and a Professor at Regent College, Vancouver, has written Lambs dancing with Wolves: A Manual for Christian Workers Overseas (Monarch/OMF, £8.99), in which, coincidentally, he contrives to quote an entire page of Charles Lamb. Evangelical Times called the book 'a wonderful guide to what is involved in cross-cultural mission.'

The Blackwell Dictionary of Evangelical Biography (1995, 2 vols) has Dr Michael Griffiths (Mid B 38-46) among its contributors and includes entries on at least two OBs. Charles Edward de Coetlogon (CH 1755-66) was well known as a preacher and published many theological works defending Calvinism and attacking 'the abominations of the Church of Rome'. Thomas Hartwell Horne (CH 1789-95, curate of Christ Church Newgate Street 1819-25), encouraged at CH by Coleridge, became one of the most prolific writers of his day on subjects as varied as grazing, topography, psalmody, law, history and biblical criticism. His Introduction to the Critical Study and Knowledge of the Holy Scriptures was a standard student text.

Missionary, evangelist, author

Book, Lambs Dancing with Wolves

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GRIMES, Norman 1948–1955 (Th B)

Building society official

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GRIMSHAW, Thomas 1995–2002 (Ma B, Gr?)

His thoughts on journalism, money and taxation:

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GRINDLAY, Bruce (Director of Music 2001-)

Staff

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GUERRA, Edward 1978–1985 (Mid A)

Teacher. His thoughts on being a trainee teacher:

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GUITON, Patrick 1944–1952 (Ba A)

Distance educator

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GULL, Rachel 1980–1987 (7's, Col A)

Where are they now: 7's until 1985 and at Hertford. Being sought by Alex Berry (now Alex Schwieso)

Solicitor

Her advice on "family friendly policies"

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GULL, Sir William (CH 1820s)

Physician

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GUNTON, Mike 1939–1947 (Col A)

Army officer

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GUTHKELCH, A Norman 1924–1933 (La A)

A Norman Guthkelch (La A 24-33) is co-editor with Karl E Misulis of The Scientific Foundations of Neurology (Blackwell Science, £92.50). He was formerly a professor at the University of Pittsburgh and a research professor at the University of Arizona.

Neurologist

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GUY, William Augustus (CH 1820s)

Statistician

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GWILLIAM, Rev Canon Oswald 1916–1920 (Ma B)

One of the oldest Blues, the Rev Canon Oswald Gwilliam (MB 16-20) died in February 1997. He studied at St Chad's College, Durham, was ordained in 1926/7 and served in the diocese of Durham throughout his ministry. After a long curacy in Gateshead he was vicar successively of Holy Trinity, South Shields (1932-41), Seaham with Seaham Harbour (1941-48) and Houghton-le-Spring (1948-71). He was made an honorary canon of Durham Cathedral in 1953. In advanced old age he was living in a caravan outside Carlisle.

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GWYNN, Dominic 1964–1971 (Pe A)

The firm of Goetze and Gwynn builds new organs in the classical British tradition and restores historic organs for churches, the National Trust and national museums. The 'Gwynn' half is Dominic Gwynn (Pe A 64-71) who has now written Historic Organ Conservation: A practical introduction to processes and planning (Church House Publishing, £9.95). An appendix recommends The Organs of the City of London (1996) by Nick Plumley (Horsham Staff/Curator 67-01).

Organ builder

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HADEN, Sir Francis Seymour (CH 1830s)

An Old Blue is the central figure in No Day Without A Line: The History of the Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers 1880-1999 by Martin Hopkinson (Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, in association with the Society, £12.95). Sir Francis Seymour Haden (CH 1830s) was the Society's first President and effective founder. A formidable, dictatorial figure, a surgeon and largely self-educated artist, he became one of the two most internationally renowned printmakers then working in Britain, the other being Whistler, his brother-in-law, rival and (eventually) enemy.

Surgeon, artist, etcher

Where to find his pictures online

His portrait by Sir William Rothenstein

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HAINES, John 1939–1946 (Ma B)

Schoolmaster & rugby referee

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HAKE, Thomas Gordon 1816–1824 (CH)

Physician & author

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HALL, Bryan 1963–1972 (Ma A, Col A)

Bryan Hall (Ma A, Col A 1963-1972) is Director of Sales at Chisholm Roth Group, a specialist Financial Training company which delivers tailored Capital Markets training to Investment Banks. We also have excellent online training courses covering all of the main financial instruments / topics and regulatory issues. Finally we have arguably the worlds most complete Trading Simulation which is used by leading banks (e.g. Citi, Barclays, HSBC) and Business Schools (in the UK, Europe and Australasia) to train traders and at many client based events.

To find out more please visit our website at www.chisholmroth.com call (07939 204648) or email me at bhall@chisholmroth.com

Chilsholm Roth Group website

Email Bryan Hall at Chilsholm Roth Group

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HALL, Edmund 1979–1986 (La A)

Broadcaster, author, campaigner

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HALL, Philip 1915–1922 (Ba B, Almoner)

Mathematician

Chronology and biography

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HALL, Roland 1942–1949 (Pe A)

Philosopher

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HALL-MATTHEWS, John 1965–1972 (Horsham Assistant Chaplain)

Priest

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HALLOWES, Michael 1932–1946 (Horsham Staff)

Horsham Staff 1932/3-46

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HAMEL, Rod 1974–1975 (Horsham Staff)

Artist, teacher, critic

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HAMILTON, John A L 1931–1938 (Col B)

War Bush: 81st (West African) Division in Burma 1943-1945 'The part played by the West Africans in Burma has been disgracefully overlooked by most military historians and this well-researched book finally does justice to the part played by this division in the Far Eastern theatre of war.'
Michael Russell (Publishers) Ltd, £25

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HAMMERSLEY, Sir Hugh (President circa 1630)

Merchant. Lord Mayor of London

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HAMMICK, Tom 1990–1992 (Artist in residence)

Artist

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HANCORN, John (Music Staff)

Singer

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HANKIN, Barclay 1927–1936 (Th A, La B)

Rhymes from Life 'NOT poetry but real events described in light verse' - 'an appealing and unusual style of autobiography.' Price £5. Details of how to obtain the book, if still available, will be added when confirmed.

In this Place - Memories of Christ's Hospital collected by Barclay Hankin; privately published 2005. All proceeds of the sale are being donated to the CH Association.

Priced at £10 per copy to include postage and packing in the UK. (For cost of overseas postage, please contact the Partnership Office on +44 (0)1403 247 588 or by sending an email to ptoff@christs-hospital.org.uk.)

Please print out and complete the order form and post it back to: The Christ's Hospital Association (CHA), Christ's Hospital, Horsham, West Sussex RH13 OYP

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HARDAKER, Guy 1969–1975 (Th A)

Commercial lawyer, Holman Fenwick & Willan

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HARDING, Mark 1973–1980 (Th A)

Travel trade journalist

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HARDING-EDGAR, Jeremy 1963–1972 (Pe B)

Finance Director, Shared Intelligence

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HARDY, Sir Thomas Duffus 1811–1818 (CH)

Archivist

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HARGREAVES, Melanie 1994–2001 (Col B, Gr W)

Student, Warwick University

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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HARLEY, Rob 1979–1983 (presumably R J L Harley, Ma B)

Partner, NewSmith Capital Partners

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HAROUN, Ansar 1959–1966 (Mid A)

After leaving CH, Haroun studied Medicine in London and Lahore, and Community Medicine in Nottingham. He then moved to America, and trained as a psychiatrist at Yale, and a child psychiatrist at Columbia.

He is now a Professor of Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Law at the medical and law schools in San Diego and the Chief Phychiatrist for the San Diego Superior Court.

He teaches 'Law, Logic and Ethics in Medicine' and was formerly with the Royal Army Medical Corps, recently retired from the US Army Medical Corps, after tours in Irag and Afghanistan.

I am now also a Governor of CH.

Psychiatrist

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HARPER, Hugo Daniel 1832–1840 (Unknown details)

Hugo Daniel Harper (CH 1832-40) was Principal of Jesus College, Oxford, for eighteen years and is roughly handled in The History of Oxford University Vol VII: Nineteenth-Century Oxford, Part 2 edited by M G Brock & M C Curthoys (Clarendon Press, £75). Previously headmaster of Sherborne, and one of the founders of the Headmasters' Conference, he didn't sufficiently change his habits, and combined ceaseless interference with an unsuitably bluff manner: 'He treated undergraduates like school-boys, and dons as subordinates.' He did however serve on the committee which founded and ran Lady Margaret Hall, one of Oxford's first two colleges for women.

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HARPIN, Philippa 1950–1956 (Ba A, 3's, Governor)

The Muscular Dystrophy Campaign has published The Adaptations Manual (£25) by its occupational therapy adviser Philippa Harpin (Barr, 3's 50-56, Governor). This warmly received handbook offers step-by-step guidance on selecting and designing the best housing adaptation for people with a progressive muscle weakening condition.

National occupational therapy adviser, Muscular Dystrophy Campaign

Download chapters from it here

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HARRIS, Leslie 1953–1960 (Ma A)

Mathematician. GCHQ official

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HARRIS, Patrick 1995–2002 (Th B, Pe A, Gr?)

Details on Big Grecian website

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HARRIS, Rachel 1999–2001 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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HARRISON, Aelfric 1902–1906 (Col B)

Peter Cornwell, a high-profile Anglican clergyman who became a Roman Catholic, wrote in his memoirs (One Step Enough, 1986) about his former headmaster at the Downs School, Wraxall, Aelfric Harrison (CB 1902-06), 'a wily left-arm bowler and Latin enthusiast' who 'could be severe and his left arm adept at exercises other than bowling, but at least - did not mix up discipline with piety.' (Harrison was a Sussex county cricketer between 1913 and 1927.)

Cricketer & headmaster

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HARRISON, Andrew 1970–1977 (La A)

Proprietor, electronic design business

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HARRISON, Stephen J 1971–1978 (Col B)

John Trappes-Lomax (Horsham Staff 74-81) has edited The Letters of Dr John Lingard to Mrs Thomas Lomax (1835-51) for the Catholic Record Society (Records, Vol 77, price unknown). Lingard (1771-1851) was an English Roman Catholic priest and historian who may secretly have been made a Cardinal. The classicist Stephen Harrison (Col B 71-78) contributes to The New Simonides: Contexts of Praise of Desire edited by Deborah Boedeker and David Sider (OUP, £48).

Apuleius: A Latin Sophist (OUP, £45) is the latest book by S.J. Harrison (Col B 71-78), Mynors and Charles Oldham Fellow and Tutor in Latin at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and University Lecturer in Classical Languages and Literature. Among his upcoming projects are a book on genre in Augustan poetry, and two edited volumes, Texts, Ideas and the Classics: Scholarship and Theory in Classical Literature, and a collection of translations of the minor works of Apuleius. He is also working on the reception of classical literature in nineteenth-century Britain.

Professor of Classical Languages & Literature, Oxford University

Book, Apuleius: A Roman Sophist

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HART, Anthony 1994–1999 (La B, Th A, La A)

Countryside promotions officer

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HART DYKE, John 1940–1947 (Col B)

Actor

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HARTLAND-ROWE, Richard 1937–1944 (Th B)

Zoologist and ecological consultant

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HARVEY, William (Benefactor 1657)

Physician. Discovered the circulation of the blood

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HASTINGS, Warren 1749–1750 (Non-Foundationer)

Governor-General of India

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HATTON, Vikki 1984–1999 (Horsham Staff)

Now Vikki Askew, Deputy Head, James Allen's Girls' School

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HAVINDEN, Ashley 1914–1919 (MaB)

Richly illustrated, Advertising and the Artist by Michael Havinden, Richard Hollis, Ann Simpson and Alice Strang (National Galleries of Scotland, £14.99) is the catalogue accompanying the current Edinburgh exhibition of the work of Ashley Havinden (Ma A 14-19), the influential designer and abstract artist who brought the language of German Modernism into British advertising. His son Michael points out that Havinden left CH at seventeen with no formal qualifications, 'though he was awarded a gold medal for winning a swimming race.'

Pseudonym Advertising designer & abstract painter

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HAWKE, Edward 1995–2002 (Ma B, Ma A, Ma B, Gr E)

Student, Southampton University

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HAWKE, Jennifer 1994–2001 (LH A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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HAWKINS, Mac 1954–1960 (Pe B)

New editions of two railway books by Mac Hawkins (Pe B 54-60) have been published by Grange Books in association with Hawk Editions. Both are glossy albums filled with photos.The Great Central: Then and Now (£19.99/£9.99) boasts an introduction by the late Earl of Lanesborough: 'an excellent and readable chronicle - his photography will be a joy to any enthusiast'. In his preface to LSWR West Country Lines: Then and Now (£19.99) Hawkins recalls the stations of his 50s boyhood. 'Exeter St David's was a place of both sheer misery and joy for me, for it marked the point of embarkation at the start of a school term, which involved a journey to Sussex via Paddington and Victoria.' Travelling to CH was 'hateful', but 'the return for holidays was one of delirium!' At Exeter Central in 1958, 'a canoe which I had built at school was safely delivered from Sussex.'

Somerset at War by Mac Hawkins (Pe B 54-60) was published in 1988. He has since compiled a 20-page supplement, Thanks for the Memory: Recollections of Somerset at War 1939-45 (Hawk Editions, price unknown).

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HAZLEWOOD, Charles 1978–1985 (La B, Ma A)

Conductor & broadcaster

Guardian interview

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HEASMAN, Tanya 1976–1983 (2's)

One of the three authors of Analysis of compensation claims related to health and safety issues (Health & Safety Executive, £15) is Tanya Heasman (2's 76-83).

Director, Management Consultancy

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HECKSTALL-SMITH, Nick 1974–1980 (La B)

Assistant director, film and television

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HEDGES, Daniel 1994–2001 (Pe B, Pe A, Gr W)

His details on Grecians 2001:

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HEDLEY, Charles 1957–1966 (Ma B)

Priest

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HEFFERNAN, John H 1878–1883 (CH)

Magistrate & mounted policeman, Canada

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HELLER, Robert 1942–1950 (Pe A, Governor)

The best-selling business author and management commentator Robert Heller (Pe A 42-50, Governor) has written a series of eight short books entitled 'Business Masterminds': Warren Buffett, Stephen Covey, Peter Drucker, Bill Gates, Andrew Grove, Charles Handy, Tom Peters and Jack Welch (Dorling Kindersley, £7.99 each). All eight are brought together in the single volume Roads to Success: Put into practice the best business ideas of eight leading gurus (same publisher, £30). Heller has also produced a 240-page, richly illustrated book on the artist Peter Howson (Momentum hbk £30, pbk £20), his second extended study of Howson's life and work.

Robert Heller (Pe A 42-50) is co-author with Paul Spenley of Riding the Revolution: How Businesses Can and Must Transform Themselves to Win the E-Wars (HarperCollins, £19.99).

Transform yourself and your fortunes with the aid of management guru Robert Heller (Pe A 42-50) who has written ten volumes for Dorling Kindersley's 'Essential Managers' series: Achieving Excellence, Communicate Clearly, Effective Leadership, How to Delegate, Making Decisions, Managing Change, Managing People, Managing Teams, Motivating People and Selling Successfully (£4.99 each). Much of the same ground is covered in The Essential Manager's Manual (co-written with Tim Hinde, same publisher, £25). His other recent books include Goldfinger: how entrepreneurs grow rich by starting small (HarperCollins, £8.99) and In Search of European Excellence: The 10 Key Strategies of Europe's Top Companies (HarperCollins, £8.99) which contains a short, admiring account of what Lord Simon of Highbury (Mid A 50-58, Senior Grecian, Governor) achieved at BP. Heller has edited Finance Today (price unknown), published by DTZ Pieda Consulting in association with the Board for Chartered Accountants in Business. He advises leading companies on strategy and is much in demand as a conference speaker in Europe, the Americas and the Far East.

Writer on business management

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HENDERSON, Ian 1989–1996 (Ma A, Ma B)

Computer scientist

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HENDERSON, Rob 1959–1963 (CH Prep School)

One of the characters in Martin Amis's autobiography Experience (Jonathan Cape, £18.00) is his best friend in younger days, Rob Henderson (CH Prep School 59-63). A man with 'a genius for adversity', he went from CH to Westminster, was sent to Wormwood Scrubs for 'a domino effect of drink-driving offences' and slept on park benches and in coalholes. He's OK now, we are assured.

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HERBERT, Hon David 1955–1961 (Horsham Staff)

Belated mention for a book published in 1998 for the sixtieth-birthday retrospective exhibition of painter Benedict Rubbra (Col A 49-56, Horsham Art Staff 60s). Benedict Rubbra: Paintings 1958-98: Ideas and Influences (Edizioni Electa, £9.95) has eighty-nine illustrations, many in colour. Its text amounts to a short autobiography, complete with CH material, notably a loving account of Nell Todd (Horsham Staff 50-69), inspiring and eccentric Head of Art. Rubbra found her impossible to paint: 'Miss Todd only looks herself when she puts on her hundred and one facial expressions and when I tell her to keep still, it looks nothing like her.' At her instigation Rubbra painted the Hon David Herbert (Horsham Staff 55-61) who went into publishing and commissioned two books from Rubbra; Herbert's widow Brenda edited the present one. A later and grander portrait commission involved Sir Colin Davis (Th B 38-44). (Rubbra also did a posthumous portrait of George Seaman (Th A, Ba B 20-27, Headmaster 55-70, Governor), never yet reproduced in The Blue.)

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HERRIES, Amanda 1965–1973 (McIlwain, 2's)

An archaeologist by training, Amanda Herries (McIlwain, 2's 65-73) worked at the Museum of London for ten years, specialising in social history and the decorative arts of the 18th and 19th centuries, and lecturing and writing. In 1988 she went to live in Tokyo with her family. While in Japan she wrote extensively on Japanese culture and art collections and she continued lecturing for Japanese audiences, often appearing on television. In 1995 she returned with her family to Britain, bringing a Japanese tea-house to feature in a new garden in Scotland. She now lectures on a number of English and Anglo-Japanese subjects and has written Japanese Gardens in Britain (Shire Publications, £4.50) which describes, with dozens of illustrations, the Japanese garden styles that have intrigued and stimulated the West for so many years.

Archaeologist, curator, lecturer, writer & broadcaster

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HESLING, James 2000–2002 (Ma B, Gr E)

Student, Southampton University

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HESTER, Alex 1982–1989 (LH A, Mid B, Mid A)

Assistant director, film & television

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HEWITT, Mike 1972–1978 (La A)

Sports photographer

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HEWITT, Peter 1973–1980 (La A)

Film director

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HICKMAN, Edward 1980–1985 (LH A)

Solicitor, now a partner at Linklaters

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HICKSON, Ian 1966–1970 (La A)

Where are they now: Being sought by Rodney Green

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HIETT, Peter 1970–1977 (Col A)

BBC journalist

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HIGGINS, Andrew 1992–1999 (Th A)

Rugbyman

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HIGHFIELD, Roger 1969–1975 (Mid B)

In The Science of Harry Potter: How Magic Really Works (Headline, £12.99), Roger Highfield (Mid B 69-75) shows how Harry Potter's magic could be recreated using cutting edge science.

Science editor, Daily Telegraph

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HILDREW, Robin 1951–1959 (Ba B)

Teacher at Sedbergh

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HILL, John 1994–2001 (Th B, Mid B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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HILL, Peter 1948–1956 (Ba A)

Political journalist

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HILL, Peter 1943–1949 (Ma B, Governor)

Insurance broker

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HILL, Rowley 1845–1855 (CH)

Bishop of Sodor & Man

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HILLARD, Michael 1956–1962 (Ba B)

Where are they now: Being sought by Wendy Killner, the Administrator of the CH Association

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HILLIER, Richard 1950–1958 (Col A)

Consultant in palliative medicine

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HILLYER, Norman 1932–1938 (Flippance, Ma A)

Priest, scholar & author

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HILTON, Steve 1981–1986 (Ma A, La A)

Steve Hilton (Ma A 81-83, La A 83-86) is co-author with Giles Gibbons of Good Business: Your World Needs You (Texere Publishing, £17.99), a 'radical manifesto for capitalism' which urges campaigners for social justice and environmental protection to regard business as their ally, not their enemy.

Senior aide to the Leader of the Opposition, political advertising specialist, consultant to business

Book, Good Business

His article ‘How green is my business?’

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HIND, C Lewis (CH 1870s)

Art critic and author

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HINES, Geoff 1951–1959 (La B, Senior Grecian)

Management consultant

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HOATH, Nicholas 1999–2001 (Th A, Gr W)

Grecians 2001 profile

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HOCKING, Brian 1926–1933 (Col B)

Entomologist

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HODDER, Andrew 1996–2002 (La B, Ma A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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HODGE, Simon 1982–1989 (Th A)

Creative agency director

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HODGSON, Arthur Benjamin 1930–1937 (Horsham Staff)

Headmaster, Archbishop Holgate's Grammar School, York

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HODGSON, Penny 1949–1957 (Brennand, 8's)

Librarian

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HOGBEN, Brian Joseph 1938–1948 (La A, Governor)

Died peacefully on 10 December 2004 aged 75. A Cambridge-educated chartered accountant, he had been Finance Director of BPB Industries plc. With his wife Ann he had five children and six grandchildren.

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HOGGARTH, Matthew 1991–1998 (Th B, Mid B)

Information

Photo gallery of places he's visited

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HOLDEN, Edward H S (CH circa 1808-16)

Physician in New York

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HOLDSWORTH, Alice 1994–2001 (LH B, Col A, Gr W)

Psychology student

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HOLDSWORTH, Howard 1966–1973 (Mid B, Staff 1992-)

Staff

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HOLLAND, Hugo 1994–2001 (Ma B, Mid A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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HOLLAND, Stuart 1951–1959 (La A)

Greg Rosen's Dictionary of Labour Biography (Politico's, £30) has entries on three OBs and an ex-Almoner (Ken Livingstone). The political economist Stuart Holland (La A 51-59) was 'the main influence behind the more radical policy agenda that emerged in the Labour Party after the disappointments of the 1964-70 Wilson government', while Cabinet minister Michael Stewart (La A 18-25) was 'the safest pair of hands' in that government. Union leader John Edmonds (Mid B 54-62) was affected by Housie's 'atmosphere of snobbery' and 'ethos of being a minor public school'; CH 'did not allow the young man to develop his personality' (but, in fairness, it did help him get into Oxford).

Chair & managing director, Alter-Europe Ltd. Academic & politician

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HOLLIDAY, Matt 1991–1998 (Mid A)

Lighting specialist

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HOLLIS, Joshua 1994–2001 (Th B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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HOLT, Patrick 1922–1928 (nee Parsons, Ma A)

The actor Patrick Holt (Parsons, Ma A 22-28) gets a namecheck or two in Come by Sunday: The Fabulous, Ruined Life of Diana Dors by Damon Wise (Pan, £5.99). He appeared in Dors's first film The Shop at Sly Corner in 1947, went to Malaga with her (and their respective spouses) in the Fifties, and delivered a tribute at her funeral.

Film & stage actor

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HONE, Harold G (Wd 13 circa 1900)

Awarded bronze medal of Royal Humane Society, 1903

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HOOK, Ross 1928–1936 (Ba B, La B, Almoner c 1980-88)

Several OBs appear in Robert Runcie: The Reluctant Archbishop by Humphrey Carpenter (Sceptre, £7.99). In wartime Oxford Runcie was in the Officers' Training Corps and was taught map-reading by Edmund Blunden (Col A 09-15, Senior Grecian) 'in a very fey kind of way; you couldn't hear what he was saying most of the time.' Back at Oxford after the war he attended Ancient History lectures by Russell Meiggs (Ma B 12-21, Senior Grecian, Horsham Staff 20s), a 'really wonderful man'. As Archbishop of Canterbury he chose as his chief of staff Ross Hook (Ba B, La B 28-36, Almoner c. 80-88) whom the present Bishop of London recalls as 'a large personality who was mis-cast as an administrative assistant.' Hook's wife Ruth did a lot of ghost-writing for Runcie. Mention is made of the book Hostage: the complete story of the Lebanon captives by Con Coughlin (Pe B 66-73).

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HOOPER, Captain Norman 1926–1933 (Mid B)

Died on 7 January 2002

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HORNE, Thomas Hartwell 1789–1795 (CH, curate Christ Church Newgate Street 1819-25)

The Blackwell Dictionary of Evangelical Biography (1995, 2 vols) has Dr Michael Griffiths (MdB 38-46) among its contributors and includes entries on at least two OBs. Charles Edward de Coetlogon (CH 1755-66) was well known as a preacher and published many theological works defending Calvinism and attacking 'the abominations of the Church of Rome'. Thomas Hartwell Horne (CH 1789-95, curate of Christ Church Newgate Street 1819-25), encouraged at CH by Coleridge, became one of the most prolific writers of his day on subjects as varied as grazing, topography, psalmody, law, history and biblical criticism. His Introduction to the Critical Study and Knowledge of the Holy Scriptures was a standard student text.

Priest, biblical scholar, bibliographer, author

Bible Numbers and Statistics

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HORSEMAN, Grace 1923–1929 (Solkhon, 6's)

Author

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HOSKINS, Paul 1977–1984 (Col A)

Conductor

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HOSKINS, Trevor W. MA, MB, BChir, DCH (Col B 1940-1950, Horsham Medical Officer 1969-1990)

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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HOUGH, Sydney Samuel (CH circa 1890)

Astronomer

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HOULDER, Christopher 1940–1947 (Col A)

Christopher Houlder (CA 40-47) died in February 2001. He was a distinguished archaeologist who spent 39 years with the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historical Monuments, serving as both Principal Investigator and Deputy Secretary.

At CH he became, so he claimed, the first person ever to photograph a cuckoo laying an egg in a usurped nest - in the ivy under the dormitory window. After Jesus College, Cambridge, and a short spell as an excavator in eastern England, he arrived at the RCAHM in 1951. He worked on the volumes for Caernarvonshire and carried out notable excavations connected with them, the best known of which was at the Axe Factory on Mynydd Rhiw. The results of his large-scale excavations at Llandegai near Bangor in the 60s were still largely unpublished at his death, but his records were in exemplary order and the publication will go ahead. He was the author of South Wales Regional Archaeologies (1966-7) and Wales: An Archaeological Guide (1974).

In the 70s he pioneered work on sites and monuments records and the distillation of such work into a National Monument Record, held by the RCAHM. He quickly grasped the importance of the on-going, updateable record in the computer age and did much to develop a national concept of monuments records through his work on the relevant working party of the Council for British Archaeology (he also had a long association with the CBA's Implement Petrology Committee).

He took a full part in developing the Archaeological Trusts within Wales, establishing their staff and salary structure, and chaired Gwynedd Archaeological Trust from 1987-92, remaining a trustee until September 2000. An adviser to the National Trust in south Wales and to the Hafod Trust, he created with his wife Yvonne (with whom he had two sons and a daughter) a remarkable garden at their clifftop farmhouse, where meticulous management ensured an amazing harvest from such a windswept site. He bore his final illness with characteristic patience and calm. Frances Lynch of CBA Wales has written: 'He will be greatly missed as a wise and experienced archaeologist, but particularly as a kind and sensitive friend.'

Archaeologist

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HOWARD, Lauren 1995–2002 (Ba A, LH A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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HOWARD, Rosie (CH insider 1994 -)

Christ's Hospital in the Year 2000 - The first ever full colour illustrated book about CH, tracking all aspects of life over the academic year 1999-2000. [publisher?], £25

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HOWES, Buster 1971–1978 (Col A)

Colonel, Royal Marines

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HUCKER, Hazel 1946–1951 (Drake, CH)

Novelist

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HUGHES, Herbert Frank (Jack) (CH 1900s)

Emigrant to British Columbia

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HUGHES, Millree 1971–1978 (La A)

Artist

Scroll down for mention

Photo

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HULL, Howard 1965–1972 (Mid B)

Ruskin scholar. Artist

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HULL, Robin 1937–1947 (Mid A)

Scottish Birds: Culture and Tradition (Mercat Press, £12.99) is described by its author Robin Hull (Mid A 37-47) as 'a distillation of a lifetime of looking at birds all over the world and being dissatisfied with what I found in books.' The Aberfeldy Magazine called it 'spellbinding - brimming with fascinating facts and folklore, history, old nomenclature and nonsense, making it an intriguing 'must have' in any library of ornithology.'

Author, lecturer, retired Professor of General Practice

Book, Scottish Birds: Culture and Tradition

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HULTON-HARROP, Montague 1925–1928 (Th B)

First British pilot killed in WW2

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HUMBER, Paul 1974–1981 (Pe B)

Under the pen name of Paul Vincent, Paul Humber (Pe B 74-81) has had three novels published, the most recent of which, FREE (£9.99), was nominated for this year's Commonwealth Fiction Prize.

His first writing commissions were comedies for Radio 4, one of which evolved into his first novel, Meet the Hormones (£8.99). His second, The Death of Me (£7.99), a comedy thriller about a small Fen town that tries to boost its tourism by faking alien landings, reached number one at Amazon.co.uk and number four at Tesco.com and was endorsed by Mark Radcliffe on Radio 1. Film rights to all three books have been sold. Paul describes his current style as 'a popularist/literate hybrid which leaves a number of critics and readers cheering, but just as many people shaking their heads in disbelief.' A qualified dentist, he now practices only once a week. He lives in Cambridge with his wife Lynda and teenage children Thomas and Josie.

Author - "Paul Vincent"

Interview

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HUMPHREY-CLARK, Margaret (Music Staff, dates?)

Vocal teacher at Guildhall. Teacher of Alexander Technique

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HUNT, Leigh 1791–1799 (CH)

Not one but two new biographies of that neglected OB Leigh Hunt (CH 1791-99): Fiery Heart: The First Life of Leigh Hunt by Nicholas Roe (Pimlico, £12.99) and The Wit in the Dungeon: The Life of Leigh Hunt by Anthony Holden (Little, Brown, £20). Roe's book chronicles Hunt's glory days as champion of liberty, journalist, editor, advocate, essayist, poet, and associate of Byron, Keats, Shelley, Hazlitt and Charles Lamb (CH 1782-89), ending in 1822 shortly after Shelley's death. Holden tells the whole story, including Hunt's long decline into obscurity (he survived until 1859). The man who, when jailed for two years for libelling the Prince Regent, not only continued to publish successfully but turned his cell into a well known left-wing literary salon (hence Holden's title) lived on and on, quarrelsome, thwarted and impoverished, to become the original of the feckless Harold Skimpole in Dickens's Bleak House. Both biographies have been well received; some critics, ignoring Ann Blainey's Immortal Boy in 1985, claimed no life of Hunt had been written since the one by Edmund Blunden (Col A 09-15, Senior Grecian) in 1930. Hunt's Selected Writings have been published in six volumes by Pickering & Chatto.

Existing accounts of Romanticism are flawed by their failure to acknowledge the importance of Leigh Hunt (CH 1791-99), argues Jeffrey N Cox in Poetry and Politics in the Cockney School: Keats, Shelley, Hunt and their Circle (Cambridge Studies in Romanticism 31, CUP, £37.50).

Author & editor

Twelve of his poems

Four portraits of him - click on each to enlarge

Two new biographies of him

His

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HUNTER, David 1968–1974 (Pe A)

Where are they now FOUND: Left CH in about 1975. Being traced by Helen Lawrence who knew him when they both lived in Paris around 1985

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HURDMAN, Nicholas 1995–2002 (La B, Pe A, Pe B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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HUTTON, Graham 1916–1920 (Th B)

The renowned statistician Sir Arthur Bowley (CH 1879-88, Governor) left detailed notes on his schooldays, which his daughter Agatha used when writing A Memoir of Professor Sir Arthur Bowley (1869-1957) and his Family. Published in 1972, the book has not been noticed by The Blue until now. CH in Bowley's time is described as 'primarily middle class and professional'. He wrote that going to Hertford was 'a terrifying and probably injurious experience for a child of nine years old' and Newgate Street offered 'sufficient teasing and minor unkindnesses to make life rather terrifying to the timid or thin-skinned, and some ignorant cruelty against anyone with natural peculiarities.' But boys 'were allowed a good deal of liberty to be out of the premises and their costume was known and respected throughout the City of London.' An academic high-flyer, he also enjoyed the boating club and wrote warmly of his fellow Grecians and many staff including James Barnard, Master of the RMS. On Speech Day the Grecians, holding white kid gloves, would take up a collection for their imminent expenses at university; this was called 'glove money' and Bowley's share in 1888 was fifteen pounds, ten shillings. He received an extra £10 to re-clothe himself when he handed back his uniform, and subsequently more than £300, mainly in the form of an Exhibition. At Cambridge his 'extremely kind and helpful' tutor was the Rev Richard Appleton (CH 1858-67, Governor, President CH Club 1896-7). A tribute to Bowley by Graham Hutton (Th B 16-20) is quoted. And there's a surprise guest star: Sir Arthur refers to a photo in The Times showing 'the school marching over London Bridge, preceded by their band, headed by a majestic Grecian tossing his baton, in 1945, en route to the Mansion House.' The majestic one was surely Paddie Drake (Col A, Ba B, Mid B 39-47), the present Old Blue Editor?

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HUTTON, Mark 1996–2002 (Th B, Ma A, Gr E)

Mathematics student, Warwick University

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HUTTON, Michael 1968–1974 (Horsham Staff)

Bandmaster

Photos

Photo gallery

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HYDE, Edwin 'Dido' 1902–1936 (Horsham Staff - returned in WW2)

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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HYDON, Veronica 1963–1970 (1's)

Priest

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ILIE, Cipriani 1999–2001 (Ma A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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ISAACS, Elias (Lyle) 1923–1929 (Th B)

Chemist

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IVACKOVIC, Gillian 1947–1953 (Paterson, 1's & 6's)

Tapestry designer & producer

Two pages of her designs

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JACOBS, Norman 1941–1949 (La A, Governor)

Died on 1 March 2003

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JAMES, Cecil Hugh "Jimmy" 1950–1999 (Governor, mid/late 20th Century)

Army dentist

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JAMES, William Arthur Lester 1906–1911 (Ba A)

Brigadier

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JARRETT, Christian 1989–1996 (La B, Mid B)

Christian Jarrett (La B, Mid B 89-96) contributed to the book Mind Hacks: Tips and Tools for Using Your Brain in the World by Tom Stafford & Matt Webb (O'Reilly, £17.50).

Psychologist & editor

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JARRETT, Michael 1941–1948 (Pe A)

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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JARVIS, Alison (nee Barlow) (Horsham staff 1930s-1950)

My mother taught mathematics at Christ's Hospital Horsham from the latter part of the war and was then Alison Barlow (full name Cicely Alison Mitford Barlow). She met my father Thomas Gwyn Jarvis, who taught physics and chemistry, and they were married I think in 1946. Sadly he died in 1950 and she then moved to Cornwall with her two small children.

She died on Feb 27th 2008, peacefully in her sleep, at the age of 99.

Sally Campbell

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JENKINS, Lewis 1994–2001 (Ma B, Th A, Pe A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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JENNINGS, Geraint 1977–1984 (Col A)

Artist, author, Jersey politician

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Jeremy, Tom 1993–2000 (Th B,Mid A )

Working for the Allegis Group, the world’s largest IT staffing consultancy as Business Development Manager.

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JESSON-DIBLEY, David 1949–1967 (Horsham Staff)

Unnoticed by The Blue at that time, David Jesson-Dibley (Horsham Staff 49-67) produced an allegorical novel in 1995. In Earth-Bound: The Big Issue (New Millennium, £7.95) the Olympian gods inspect the contemporary world and are not happy with what they find.

Author & editor

His edition of Robert Herrick's poems

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JOEL, Catherine 1973–1980 (2's)

Where are they now: Was in House 2, Hertford, from 1973-80. Whilst she was at CH, she lived in Blandford. Being traced by Lawra Barnett (neé Leslie-Miller, House 2)

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John & Frances West Family Group

The John & Frances West Family Group

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JOHNSON, Simon 1961–1970 (La B)

Head hunter

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JOHNSON, Wendy 1961–1967 (2's)

Research chemist. Business Manager, Esymbio

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JOLY, Simon 1962–1971 (Col A, Mid B)

Conductor

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JONES, David 1944–1953 (Mid B)

Academic & psychotherapist

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JONES, Gabriel 1732–1739 (CH)

Notable attorney in America

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JONES, Gareth 1957–1967 (Prep B, Col B)

Headmaster of the International School of Paris since 1997 – www.isparis.edu

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JONES, Marcus 1996–2002 (La B, Th A, Th B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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JONES, Peter Austin 1953–1969 (Horsham Staff)

Poet & publisher

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JONES, Rev Maurice Hughes Rowlestone 1915–1922 (Ba A)

Died in February 2003. Before entering the Church he worked in the City as an assistant manager in an export shipping business, followed by service in the wartime RAF. Ordained in 1947 he spent three years as curate of St Matthew's in Oxford followed by twelve as an area secretary for the Church Missionary Society in various parts of the Midlands. From 1962 until 1975 he was Vicar of Holy Trinity, Southall, and Anglican Chaplain of Mount Pleasant Hospital. Retiring to Cheltenham he continued to officiate as a priest in the Gloucester diocese until 1990. His interests were music, photography and literature. He never married.

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JONES, Sophire 1997–2001 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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JONES, Timothy 1962–1969 (Col B)

The second edition of Gypsy and Traveller Law (Commission for Racial Equality/the Legal Action Group) was published in October 2007 and now (much enlarged) costs £30 from the Legal Action Group. Tim Jones (Col B 62-69) is the lead writer of the chapter on Planning Law.

Barrister

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JONES, Tweazle 1960–1968 (Theresa Mills, 2's)

Publican, restaurateur, Egon Ronay inspector

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JOSELIN, Frank 1916–1922 (Mid B)

Educator in Africa

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JOYNSON, Vernon 1962–1971 (Th A)

Another bulky, profusely illustrated volume from Vernon Joynson (Th A 62-71), Up Yours! A guide to UK punk, New Wave and early post punk (Borderline Productions, £29.50) contains an A-Z listing of relevant artists with discographies, personnel details, band histories and comment on the music.

Pop historian. Two of his books:

'Up Yours!'

Vernon Joynson Ruined My Life by Jeff Lewis

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JUDGE, Emma 1995–2002 (Col A, Gr W)

Student, Leicester University

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JUDSON, Bob 1973–1980 (Col B)

Group Captain RAF

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JUKES, John 1993–2001 (Ma B, Ma A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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KANANI, Zheni 1999–2001 (LH A, Gr E)

Violinist

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KARIM, Jaz 1973–1974 (Mid A)

Squash player & coach

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KARPUS, Jurgis 2000–2002 (Mid A, Gr W)

Student, London School of Economics

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KARZEL, Tomasz 2000–2002 (Ma A, Gr E)

Student, London School of Economics

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KAVANAGH, Laurence 1999–2001 (La A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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KEALL, Siân 1983–1990 (3's, Ba A)

Lawyer. Partner, Travers Smith

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KEEFE, Bruce 1994–2001 (La B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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KELLAR, Paul 1957–1966 (La B, Governor)

Digital technology engineer

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KELLY, Dan 1988–1988 (Artist in residence 1988)

Potter

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KEMP, Clive 1971–2004 (Horsham Staff)

His death in 2004:

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KENNEY, E J 1935–1943 (Col A, Senior Grecian, Treasurer 1984-86)

The 75th birthday of the Cambridge classicist E J Kenney (CA 35-43, Senior Grecian, Treasurer 84-86) was marked by a festschrift entitled Amor: Roma. Love & Latin Literature (Cambridge Philological Society, Supplementary Volume 22, price unknown). The journal Scholia called it 'a tribute demonstrating personal affection, long familiarity, and great care in the making.' Volume 20 of the same series (Juvenal's Mayor: the Professor who lived on 2d. a day by John Henderson) is also about an Old Blue: John E B Mayor (CH 1832/3-36), Professor of Latin at Cambridge from 1872 until 1910.

Classical scholar

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KENT, Humphrey 1607–1617 (CH)

Settler in Virginia

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KENT-WINSLEY, James 1994–2001 (Ma B, Th A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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KEOGH, Deirdre 1960–1967 (5's & 2's, Governor)

Lecturer in Finance, Charles Sturt University, New South Wales

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KESTER, Jonathan 1979–1985 (La A)

Vicar of St Mary the Virgin, Ilford, Essex

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KEYES, Sarah 1994–2001 (Ba A, Gr E)

Biology student, Bath University

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KEYS, Ivor 1931–1938 (Ba A, Th B)

Musicologist

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KHAN, Aziza 1980–1984 (3's)

Dentist

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KIDD, B J (CH circa 1880)

Church historian

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KILLICK, Marjory

Where are they now: Was at Hertford from sometime about 1910 to 1920. Tony Rogers, son of Winifred Woolcott, is researching the family history and would be grateful for any information about his mother. In particular, he would like to trace Marjory Killick who was a school friend of his mother's

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KIME, Jeffrey 1960–1968 (La A)

Actor

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KING, Barnaby 1995–2002 (Th B, Mid A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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KING, Bill 1965–1972 (Pe B)

Congratulations to Bill King (Pe B 65-72) on his inauguration as Mayor of Torfaen in South Wales.

Profile & photo

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KING, Canon Philip 1946–1954 (Ma A)

Canon Philip King (Ma A 1946-54) died on 25 April. He was a former general secretary of the South American Mission Society and secretary to the Church of England Board of Mission.

Read Canon Philip King's obituary in the Daily Telegraph

Priest & missionary

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KING, Jeremy 1964–1972 (Pe A)

Restaurateur

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KING, M H R (Bobby) King CBE 1926–1934 (Th B)

Died suddenly on 24 April 2003

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KING, Mike 1960–1969 (Prep A, Col A)

Where are they now: Lived in Norwich at that time. Being traced by Steve Webb

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KING, Walter 1956–1963 (Ma B)

Vice-Dean of Chelmsford

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KINGDON, Roger 1940–1949 (Pe A, Governor)

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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KINGSFORD, Peter 1920–1925 (La A)

Without a Shot in Anger: Army Agitators 1944-46 An autobiographical account of his service in the Education Corps in India and Malaya. 'A searching and sensitive account of imperialism in action.' Up Front Publishing, £11.99

Historian & author

His latest book, Without a Shot in Anger

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KINNERSLY, Edward 1985–1992 (Mid A)

Internet marketing consultant

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KIRKPATRICK, Alex 1986–1993 (Th A)

Proprietor, Incite New Business

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KIRKPATRICK, Randolph 1872–1879 (CH)

A remarkable OB eccentric is recalled in 'Crazy Old Randolph Kirkpatrick', one of the essays in Stephen Jay Gould's The Panda's Thumb: More Reflections in Natural History (1980). Randolph Kirkpatrick (CH 1872-79), assistant keeper of lower invertebrates at the British Museum from 1886 to 1927, conceived what Gould calls 'the nuttiest of crackpot theories developed in this century by a professional natural historian'. From 1915 he had to publish his works privately as no scientific journal would touch them. He persuaded himself that igneous rocks were made of fossilised nummulites (single-celled shell-secreting creatures) and must therefore be sediments deposited at the ocean bottom, not products of molten material from the earth's core. The same was true of meteorites - in fact all rocks on the earth's surface, including the influx from space, were made of fossils, and the coiled form of nummulites was the architecture of life itself, 'the fundamental structure of living matter'. Gould sees Kirkpatrick as the sort of visionary scientist who is usually wrong but can sometimes be outstandingly right, and points out that his bold early work on the taxonomy of sponges was proved correct, fifty years later.

Palaeontologist

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KIRKWOOD, Guy 1978–1985 (Ba A, La B, Ma A)

Outsourcing recruiter & commentator

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KITCHER, Philip 1958–1966 (Pe A)

When Philip Kitcher (Pe A 58-66) was a graduate student, he says, 'philosophy of science clearly meant philosophy of physical science'. Ways of thinking about theory, explanation and the growth of scientific knowledge were developed in relation to a few examples from physical science 'and nobody seemed to worry that they wouldn't apply in biology or psychology.' Hence his collection of essays In Mendel's Mirror: Philosophical Reflections on Biology (OUP, £19.99), which examines (for example) notions of race and ethnicity, genetic determinism, the Human Genome Project and the metamorphosis of 'creation science' into 'intelligent design creation.'

Latest book by the Columbia philosophy professor Philip Kitcher (Pe A 58-66) is Science, Truth and Democracy (OUP, £22.50), an attempt to re-direct the philosophy of science by rejecting both the 'purist' view that the pursuit of scientific knowledge is always valuable and necessary and the opposing claim that scientific research always serves the interests of those who hold power. Kitcher proposes instead 'a democratic and deliberative framework for responsible scientists to follow.

Philosopher of science, Columbia University

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KITSON, Tony (Horsham Staff 1920s)

This may be well known but was news to me: the composer, conductor, broadcaster and journalist Jonah Barrington (Cyril Dalmaine, Horsham Staff 25-30) produced an autobiography (And Master of None, Walter Edwards, 1948) in which he wrote of CH with huge admiration. His portrait of William Hamilton Fyfe (Headmaster 19-30) is instantly recognisable. 'He ruled this vast virile community ... with a velvet glove entirely innocent of any hidden mailed fist. His only disciplinary weapon was an outrageous and awful and irrepressible sense of humour..... He was the true democrat, and Christ's Hospital the true democracy.' Among outstanding staff were Tony Kitson 'who played golf as elegantly as he played the organ', Twinkle Wilkinson (02-29) 'who had a genius for making boys sing in tune' and Dr Friend (Medical Officer until 1946) 'who cured me of boils and all shyness in matters appertaining to the body (he would bark the most intimate instructions at the top of his voice)'. Barrington staged orchestral concerts 'on the slightest provocation', causing much upheaval. 'Fyfe approved, turned up to every concert, and shielded me from the slings and arrows of outraged housemasters.' All the key components of CH are still there, Barrington says, 'and if ever I had a son I would move heaven and earth to see he were there too.' In earlier days at the Royal College of Music, he and Constant Lambert (CA 14-22) - 'a brilliant young modernist with a limp' - were two of the three candidates for the Mendelssohn composition scholarship. Neither won.

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KNIGHT, Professor Alan 1957–1965 (Ma B)

The first two volumes of a history of Mexico by Professor Alan Knight (Ma B 57-65) have just been published by Cambridge University Press: Mexico: Volume 1: From the Beginning to the Spanish Conquest (£45 hbk, 316.95 pbk) and Mexico: Volume 2: The Colonial Era (£47.50 hbk, £17.95 pbk).

The History of St Antony's College, Oxford, 1950-2000 by C S Nicholls (Macmillan/St Antony's, £47.50) records that the chair of Latin American History attached to the college has been occupied since 1992 by Alan Knight (Ma B 57-65), one of whose books won a prestigious prize in the United States.

Professor of Latin American History, Oxford University

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KNIGHT, Sonia 1996–2002 (Ba A, Hertford, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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KORONKA, Paul 1966–1971 (Pe A)

Risk consultant

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KRUGER, Andries 2000–2002 (?Th A, ?Gr W, ?Ma B, ?La A)

Where are they now FOUND: Lives in South Africa. Being "traced" by Leon Langton

Medical student, Cape Town, SA. Cricketer

Details on Big Grecian

Third paragraph of "School cricket - great fun"

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KUO, Peter 1994–2001 (Pe B, Mid B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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LABAND, Olivia 1995–2002 (Ba A, Hertford, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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LABBETT, Beverley (La A circa 1951-60)

Died in 1999 or early 2000. After CH he did a year's VSO in Belize and then read Modern History and Political Science at Trinity College, Dublin, adding a PGCE at London University's Institute of Education. In 1968 he began teaching history at Silver Jubilee Boys' School in Bury St Edmunds, where he met and married Laure. He blossomed as an educationalist and in 1977 was appointed as a lecturer at the University of East Anglia, tutoring the MA programme and engaging in curriculum projects, which often combined local history and information technology. He never lost his passion for teaching. An obituary in the UEA newsletter BroadView spoke of his 'enthusiasm, curiosity and imagination ... unfailing good humour and gentle humanity' and capacity to make others feel valued.

Go by the Ancient, Classical Way of Calais (£5.95 + £1 post & packing from Mousehold Press, Victoria Cottage, Constitution Opening, Norwich NR3 4BD) by the late Beverley Labbett (LA c. 51-60) looks at the generations of poets, artists, academics, politicians, bluestockings and aristocrats who began their continental travels by crossing the English Channel in small, hazardous 'packets'.

Teacher & educationalist

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LACEY, Paul 1994–2001 (Th B, Ma A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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LAMB, Charles 1782–1789 (CH)

There were mixed reviews of The Lambs of London (Chatto & Windus, £15.99), a novel by Peter Ackroyd in which Charles Lamb (CH 1782-89) and his sister Mary get mixed up with the literary forger William Ireland. Some reviewers thought Ireland looms so large that the book's title is inappropriate, others that the story Ackroyd invents for the Lambs is less interesting than the real one, but the author has been praised for his rendering of Mary's mental instability, the claustrophobic Lamb household and a feverish Georgian London.

Not one but two new biographies of that neglected OB Leigh Hunt (CH 1791-99): Fiery Heart: The First Life of Leigh Hunt by Nicholas Roe (Pimlico, £12.99) and The Wit in the Dungeon: The Life of Leigh Hunt by Anthony Holden (Little, Brown, £20). Roe's book chronicles Hunt's glory days as champion of liberty, journalist, editor, advocate, essayist, poet, and associate of Byron, Keats, Shelley, Hazlitt and Charles Lamb (CH 1782-89), ending in 1822 shortly after Shelley's death. Holden tells the whole story, including Hunt's long decline into obscurity (he survived until 1859). The man who, when jailed for two years for libelling the Prince Regent, not only continued to publish successfully but turned his cell into a well known left-wing literary salon (hence Holden's title) lived on and on, quarrelsome, thwarted and impoverished, to become the original of the feckless Harold Skimpole in Dickens's Bleak House. Both biographies have been well received; some critics, ignoring Ann Blainey's Immortal Boy in 1985, claimed no life of Hunt had been written since the one by Edmund Blunden (Col A 09-15, Senior Grecian) in 1930. Hunt's Selected Writings have been published in six volumes by Pickering & Chatto, price £495.

Alethea Hayter in The Wreck of the Abergavenny (Pan, £6.99) reconstructs the 1805 maritime disaster in which 260 lives were lost including the ship's captain, John Wordsworth, brother of the writers William and Dorothy, who were devastated by the news. The Times reviewer noted that Charles Lamb (CH 1782-89) 'provided practical help, collecting witness statements and chasing insurance companies. The ever sympathetic Coleridge (CH 1782-91, Senior Grecian) - 'fell to the ground in a convulsive hysterical fit.'

Reviewing A Double Life: A Biography of Charles and Mary Lamb by Sarah Burton (Viking £16.99) in The Times on 27 August, Peter Ackroyd wrote with rich appreciation of Charles Lamb himself (CH 1782-89) and of Christ's Hospital. 'There is a famous story, repeated in this absorbing book, of 'two pupils going home together, parting at the door, the one to go up to his father (the master) in the drawing room, the other to go down to his father (the coachman) in the kitchen'. It is a fine example of the egalitarianism of the school'. Of Lamb's friendship with Wordsworth and the 'quixotic and fickle' Coleridge (CH 1782-91, Senior Grecian), he observed: 'It is a measure of Charles Lamb's essential kindliness and grace that he managed to maintain a relationship with these two giants of egotism to the end.'

In 1817 the painter-diarist Benjamin Robert Haydon gave a dinner party; the guests included Wordsworth, Keats and Charles Lamb (CH 1782-89). Penelope Hughes-Hallett in The Immortal Dinner (Viking, £15.99) uses this event as the focus of a portrait of early 19th-century England. Peter Ackroyd, reviewing it in The Times on 30 August, wrote affectionately of 'the whimsical and drunken Lamb' and his 'inebriated antics'.

Author

The Charles Lamb Society

Several of his essays, including

His essay Christ's Hospital Five and Thirty Years Ago

Barry Cornwall's memoir of him

5 portraits of him, one of them based on a painting by Henry Hoppner Meyer (? Non-Foundationer 1790s)

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LAMBERT, Constant 1914–1922 (Col A)

This may be well known but was news to me: the composer, conductor, broadcaster and journalist Jonah Barrington (Cyril Dalmaine, Horsham Staff 25-30) produced an autobiography (And Master of None, Walter Edwards, 1948) in which he wrote of CH with huge admiration. His portrait of William Hamilton Fyfe (Headmaster 19-30) is instantly recognisable. 'He ruled this vast virile community ... with a velvet glove entirely innocent of any hidden mailed fist. His only disciplinary weapon was an outrageous and awful and irrepressible sense of humour..... He was the true democrat, and Christ's Hospital the true democracy.' Among outstanding staff were Tony Kitson (dates?) 'who played golf as elegantly as he played the organ', Twinkle Wilkinson (02-29) 'who had a genius for making boys sing in tune' and Dr Friend (Medical Officer until 1946) 'who cured me of boils and all shyness in matters appertaining to the body (he would bark the most intimate instructions at the top of his voice)'. Barrington staged orchestral concerts 'on the slightest provocation', causing much upheaval. 'Fyfe approved, turned up to every concert, and shielded me from the slings and arrows of outraged housemasters.' All the key components of CH are still there, Barrington says, 'and if ever I had a son I would move heaven and earth to see he were there too.' In earlier days at the Royal College of Music, he and Constant Lambert (CA 14-22) - 'a brilliant young modernist with a limp' - were two of the three candidates for the Mendelssohn composition scholarship. Neither won.

Composer & conductor

"Tiresias" & "Pomona"

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LAMBERT, Edward 1961–1970 (Wright, Th A)

Composer, conductor & pianist

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LANE, Roger 1966–1972 (Mid B)

Major-General

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LANG, Alastair 1930–1936 (Col B)

Alastair Lang DFC (Col B 30-36), a wartime Squadron Leader who later became a director of Mobil Oil, has died aged 88.

Squadron Leader Alastair Lang with Winston Churchill Squadron Leader Alastair Lang, who has died aged 88 lived in Collingbourne Ducis for nearly thirty years.

Early in his RAF career he was posted to 156 (Pathfinder) Squadron at Warboys in September 1942, as a young Flying Officer with 22 operational sorties already under his belt. The squadron had just been selected, with three others, to form the nucleus of the newly-formed Pathfinder Force, and Alastair immediately volunteered for this new task to get away from interim instructional duties.

He arrived at Warboys, near Huntingdon, at the same time as a certain Pilot Officer Lighton Verdon-Roe, whose father, Sir Alliott Verdon-Roe had founded the famous aircraft companies A.V. Roe & Co. Ltd (Avro') and later, Saunders-Roe Ltd and whose aunt was Dr Marie Stopes, the early pioneer of birth control.

The squadron was equipped with Wellington bombers at this time, but by January l943 had acquired the formidable new Avro Lancasters onto which it quickly converted. At this time, these two pilots were joined by an Australian, Flight Lieutenant Peter Isaacson, DFM from 460 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force, who had already flown Lancasters, and personally checked out Lang and Verdon-Roe onto the new aircraft.

These three men became the greatest of friends, and quickly earned themselves the title of "The Terrible Threesome" from their C.O. Wing Commander Tommy Rivett-Carnac. Like many very young men in the acute grip of war they found various ways of coping with the pressure.

At the beginning of l943, the squadron casualty rate was gradually rising, leading to a decline in morale. In l942 the squadron had lost 45 aircraft, l9 since starting its Pathfinder role. In l943 this would rise to 58 aircraft (each Lancaster having a crew of seven).

Now fast becoming the oldest members of the squadron, by reason of their continuing survival, Lang, Verdon-Roe and Isaacson decided occasional bouts of exuberance would not go amiss.

Lang and Verdon-Roe had recently developed a game to enliven the proceedings - on routine night-flying training flights over the U.K. they had raced each other back (and begun to involve others too) to try to be the first to be interrogated and de-briefed by an exceptionally pretty and intelligent W.A.A.F. officer (rather than by her male colleagues). The sight of their Lancasters screeching at high speed around the perimeter track to their dispersals, and braking abruptly to a halt, became a common sight to their ground crews as this game developed!

Alastair Lang in 1940 By early May, Alastair had extended the contest to the returning from operations over Germany, and he cut the corners on the normal dog's legs' to try to beat Lighton back. So far, Alastair had been successful, but cutting corners like this exposed them to areas of heavy flak, or night fighter activity. So Alastair had agreed a truce' with Lighton for the operation to Dortmund on May 4th.

Lang's Flight Engineer was Sgt Jack "Nobby" Clark, DFM, a man of uncanny ability to foretell whether an operation would be cancelled. Indeed during briefings the CO, Rivett-Carnac, would frequently turn to Clark to enquire half-jokingly as to whether the operation would proceed.

Shortly before their mission to Dortmund of May 4th 1943 Clark took Lang aside and advised him that their crew would "undergo a drastic change of circumstances but that he should not worry for himself".

Over Dortmund, the Target Indicator bombs in his Lancaster hung up' (although the rest of the bombs dropped normally). A few seconds later his Lancaster exploded in a massive fireball, seen by Lighton behind him. The nose and cockpit section of the Lancaster tumbled down separately, while the rest disintegrated in flames. Clark came forward to help Lang with his parachute which was stuck and both men were pinned into the falling nose section. They were somehow thrown out backwards and their parachutes opened just seconds before they hit the ground hard. Lang broke his ankle, and Clark suffered head injuries. They were the only survivors among the crew.

Both were eventually taken to hospital by the Germans, and became prisoners-of-war in Stalag Luft 3 (Sagan) the famous "wooden horse" camp. Clark was able to feign madness and was repatriated after a relatively short stay. Lang stayed at Sagan and was then moved to Stalag 3a (Luckenwalde) a notoriously hard camp until released by the Russian army in May 1945. There exists an intense portrait of him during this period by Leonard Pearman the artist, who was a fellow prisoner of war in Sagan.

It had been Alastair's 50th operational trip, and just prior to this, he had been awarded the D.F.C. on March 9th in l943 "for displaying exceptional ability and consistently setting a high example of courage and determination" on operations to targets in Germany and Italy.

He had also been confirmed as Squadron Leader a few days earlier. His wife Barbara and baby daughter Virginia learnt of his safety a month later, but his great friend Lighton (now also confirmed as a Sqd. Ldr and awarded a D.F.C.) perished a week later over Germany.

Later in 1943 Peter Isaacson flew Q-Queenie the first Lancaster down to Australia on a war-bond mission. He later became Wing Commander Peter Isaacson RAAF, AM DFC AFC DFM.

The "Terrible Threesome" had outlived their luck, but had more than done their bit in lifting the Squadron's morale at a critical time.

GENERAL BIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS

Alastair Grant Lang was born on October 26th l9l9 in Burma, one of three brothers and two sisters of Hugh Francis Lang and his wife Cara Jamesa Grant.

Shortly afterwards, Alastair's father, a merchant trader, died on his way back from India and his mother, living at Bexhill-on-Sea, Sussex brought up her family of five alone in considerable hardship.

Alastair was educated at Seaford College and Christ's Hospital, Horsham, and both he and his brother Hugh (known as Ian), joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve as war broke out in l939, Hugh being trained as a fighter pilot and Alastair as a bomber pilot.

Alastair had gained his wings' by October l940, and after converting onto Wellington bombers at Lossiemouth, was posted to 150 Squadron at Newton, Nottinghamshire in April l941. He flew his first Operation' on April 15th as second pilot, and his first as skipper on June 11th. In the meantime, on April 20th, his brother, Hugh, flying with 242 Squadron over the Channel, was involved in a unique accident when Hugh, another pilot and their Squadron C.O., Sqd. Ldr W.P.F. Treacy, D.S.O, finding themselves suddenly under attack from German fighters all collided together, and drowned when their Hurricanes crashed into the sea.

Just 10 days after flying as skipper on his first operation, Alastair married his fiancée Barbara Davies in Eastbourne on June 21st 1941, and after a brief honeymoon in London, was back on operations again just four days later.

By August l941 Alastair had completed 19 operational trips, before being posted to an Operational Training Unit to train more bomber pilots to help make up the losses now being sustained. By September 1942, although he had flown on the three 1,000 bomber raids' on German cities that had meant using the Training Unit aircraft to make up the numbers, Alastair was desperate to get back on regular operations again, and when he heard of the new Pathfinder Force being formed, volunteered immediately, and was posted to l56 Squadron by September 21st 1942.

After his return to England when the war ended, Alastair elected to remain with the RAF in Peacetime. He was posted to 12 (Bomber) Squadron on October 8th 1945, and found himself flying Lancasters again as Squadron Leader in charge of B' Flight. In August l946 they converted onto Avro Lincolns, and in September Alastair was elevated to be the Officer Commanding 12 Squadron.

In May l947 Alastair was posted to 617 Squadron (The Dambusters') as B' Flight Commander and underwent intensive training in formation and instrument flying, in preparation for a tour of the USA. The squadron flew out from Binbrook on July 23rd l947, crossed the Atlantic to Gander and Andrew Field (Washington) and then toured the USA for the month of August, calling at Detroit, Salina, Wichita, Sacramento, Riverside, Fort Worth, Montgomery and back to Washington. Then they visited Trenton, Ontario, and flew back over Gander, arriving back at Binbrook on September 9th l947.

Alastair then returned as O.C. of 12 Squadron until the end of 1947, before making a major career course change and opting to become a fighter pilot from 1948 onwards (in his brother's footsteps).

After a course at the Central Flying School at Little Rissington (Jan-July l948), Alastair dropped a rank back to Flight Lieutenant, and was posted to 615 (County of Surrey) Squadron, Royal Auxiliary Air Force at Biggin Hill, to fly Spitfire F.22s. He became O.C. of the Squadron and regained his rank as Sqd. Ldr. In December l949, then after converting to fly the jet Gloster Meteor F-4, Alastair was posted to 66 (Fighter) Squadron at Linton-on-Ouse in May l959 as Commanding Officer, flying Meteor F.8s as a key unit in Fighter Command. He immediately put the squadron on an intensive formation flying and aerobatics course of training, and he led the squadron in a memorable aerobatic display at the RAF Air Display at Farnborough on July 7th and 8th, l950. He remained in command until august l952, remembering that on one occasion, he flew the BBC Air Correspondent, Raymond Baxter, in a Meteor 7 to make a broadcast on flying a jet fighter (Raymond himself being an ex-spitfire pilot).

After this, Alastair took a post in Ceylon in October 1952 helping to train Royal Ceylon Air Force cadets on Chipmunk trainers and preparing them to receive de Havilland Vampire fighters from England.

Then in 1954 it was back to the inevitable deskjob in London working for the Ministry of Supply and being responsible for managing cockpit layout, lighting and air conditioning of the RAF's new fighter aircraft.

Alastair made sure he took the regular familiarisation courses (to keep his hand in at flying) every year, and as part of his job (and with a twinkle in his eye) he insisted he personally try out the new fighters that came along - the Swift F.4, Hunter F.4, Swift FR-5 and Gnat Mk 1.

He would get a briefing on their handling, then climb aboard, and - as laconically stated in his log book - "climb to 45,000 ft, exceed Mach 1 (ie go through the Sound Barrier) and Aerobatics". He thoroughly enjoyed these short flights, but finally decided to leave the RAF in August l957.

Alastair then joined Mobil Oil in London, and worked his way up through several Departments, becoming manager of the Wholesale Fuel Department and looking after contracts with, amongst others, suppliers of aviation fuels at airports and airfields around the U.K. He retired as a Director to his family home at Collingbourne Ducis, near Marlborough in Wiltshire.

Alastair was an all-round sportsman, playing cricket for his schools, rugby for his RAF units and tennis and golf in later life. He was also keen on horse-racing, playing Bridge, and he and his wife were well-known for their parties and social activities. He life to the full, and felt the loss of his wife Barbara deeply, when she pre-deceased him on December 3rd l992. He later married Tessa Anderson in l999, who also predeceased him.

Alastair died on October 28th 2007, just two days after his 88th birthday, and is survived by his three daughters, Virginia, Charmian and Judith, two step-daughters and his grandchildren, Louise and Charles.

Obituary taken from This is Wiltshire website

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LANG, Craig Sellar 1929–1945 (Horsham Staff)

Composer

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LANG, Horace (CH 1900s)

Schoolmaster & wartime soldier

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LANGTON, Leon 1995–2002 (Ma B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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LANSLEY, Peter 1959–1966 (La B)

Doctor

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LAUGHTON, Chris 1969–1976 (Col A)

Accountant. Partner, Mercer & Hole

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LAUWERYS, Joseph 1929–1932 (Horsham Staff)

Educationalist

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LAVENDAR, Peter 1961–1969 (Col A)

Congratulations to Peter Lavender (Col A 61-69) who received an OBE for services to education in the Queen's Birthday Honours list 2006.

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LAW, Tim 1956–1964 (Horsham Staff)

For part of his time at CH was housemaster of Lamb A, died recently of a heart attack at his home in Wareham, Dorset, aged 80, according to a report in the Hertfordshire press from which the following is taken. He turned to teaching after war service as a naval officer, based on a destroyer in the Mediterranean. At one time he was on the staff at Gordonstoun, and after leaving CH he became head of an independent school in Bude, Cornwall. From 1972 to 1978 he was headmaster of Hemel Hempstead School, guiding it through the difficult transition from grammar school to comprehensive. There he is recalled as 'quite a character and very much larger than life' who believed in people 'as individuals and not as part of a target setting exercise.'

Tim Law's wife Anne predeceased him in 1987. They had two sons, Matthew and Duncan. The latter remembers him as a great encourager, supporter and listener, someone who gave wise advice 'because he was a deep thinker who founded his thinking in a principle of being sensitive to the person and in love. He was incredibly generous of himself, quite unconventional, mischievous and fun with an almost child-like quality of taking delight in things.' Throughout his life there was a principle of serving others without seeking reward: 'He had a very disabled sister and his life from an early age was focused on making life tolerable for her. In the war he served the men he was working with and then went into teaching which is completely about serving people.'

He has been buried in a woodland site in Dorset, where his sons intend to plant an oak tree on his grave so he can carry on being 'life giving and beautiful'.

Headmaster, Hemel Hempstead School

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LAYTON or LEYTON or WOODGATE, Gregory

Where are they now: Gregory Woodgate who left CH in 1986 and is being sought by his family to ensure he attends his Grandmother's 90th birthday in May 2002

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LAZELL, Hannah 2000–2002 (Ba A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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Le PAGE, Robert 1932–1937 (Pe B)

York University's Emeritus Professor of Language and Linguistic Science, Robert Le Page (Pe B 32-37), has published Ivory Towers: Memoirs of a Pidgin Fancier. A personal memoir of the evolution of Creole Language studies as he took part in it from 1945 onwards, it recounts his travels in the Caribbean - leading to his standard work, The Dictionary of Jamaican English - and his later academic peregrinations. The book is available for £15 including postage from Le Page at Lowfield House, 34 Main Street, Heslington, York, YO10 5EG.

Emeritus Professor of Language & Linguistic Science, York University

His autobiography, Ivory Towers: Memoirs of a Pidgin Fancier

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LEACOCK, John 1730–1739 (CH)

Madeira merchant

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LEADBEATER, Amy 2000–2002 (Ba B, Gr W)

Currently living and working in Kent for a charity researching new financial services for charities. She left DeMontfort University last June.

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LEASK, David 1964–1974 (Col A)

Where are they now FOUND: Being traced by Martin Broadbridge

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LEBON, Ed 1994–2001 (Ma B, Th A, Gr W)

Student, Durham University

His 2002 article "For Peace in Iraq"

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LECHMERE, David 1961–1968 (Pe B)

Actuary - pdf file

Or scroll down this HTML one

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LECKY, Brian 1958–1967 (Mid B)

Neurologist

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LEDWITH, Frank 1918–1924 (Mid B)

Died aged 94 on 31 July 2001, had a notable career in marine liability insurance. On leaving CH, where his brother Don replaced him, he joined the firm of Thomas R Miller & Sons, which managed three Protecting and Indemnity (P&I) clubs. He stayed there for 48 years, rising from junior clerk to second senior partner. During that time more clubs were added, the staff expanded from ten to two hundred and the firm found itself insuring the liabilities of over 20% of the world's shipping. In the 1980s David Farrington (LB 56-63, Treasurer 00- ) wrote that 'the present day pre-eminence' of Miller's 'in the field of international trade, insurance and transportation?can be traced directly to that period when Frank was in command.' A first-rate negotiator, always maintaining a large caseload, Ledwith saw insurance as 'basically a means of caring for those in trouble?putting right things that are wrong.' In WW2 he played a major role in administering the UK War Insurance Scheme, dealing with the loss of hundreds of British and British Empire ships. After the war he was a leading adviser to Greek ship owners (receiving the Greek Nautical Medal) and aided the recovery of Japanese shipping interests. At Miller's he was known affectionately as 'P&I on legs'.

Image of Frank Ledwith

Frank Ledwith

Around 1933, partly through the testimony of the Rev Ben Baxter (LB 18-24), he joined the Moral Re-Armament movement, which began life as the Oxford Group and is known today as Initiatives of Change. Embracing its beliefs in absolute honesty, purity, unselfishness and love, he decided that 'God should rule my whole life, so far as I could understand his guidance.' He was active in MRA for many years, helping them, for example, to buy the Westminster Theatre and serving as chairman of its Friends.

Retiring from Miller's he continued to act as technical adviser to a NATO planning committee dealing with merchant marine matters in the event of a third world war. Meanwhile his book of 'carefree affectionate recollection', Ships that Go Bump in the Night (1974), was remarkably well received. With its 1977 sequel, Ships Afloat in the City, it is still regarded as standard reading for P&I executives. In 1987 a third volume appeared, The Best of All Possible Worlds. The books contain many memories of CH. Ledwith is honest about bullying, loneliness and dire wartime food, but also about his growing sense of gratitude. He and his contemporaries 'meet with real warmth and reminisce with carefree laughter.'

In the OB context he was best known for revitalising the Old Blues' Cycling Club between the wars, with the aid of Tom Dowden (MdA 14-18) and Herbert Vening (TB 18-24). The future OB Editor Frank Smith (MA 19-26) was a keen supporter; he and Ledwith arrived at Old Blues' Day at least once on a tandem, ridden from Lambeth. In later years Ledwith was the CH representative on the Council of the Charles Lamb Society.

He retained his amazing memory into advanced old age and took a continuing interest in Miller's and the clubs. 'Almost to the end,' the chairman of Miller's wrote in 2001, 'it was worth sounding out his view on a thorny P&I or TT [Through Transport] problem.'

Ledwith and his wife Constance married in 1932. They had a son and a daughter, and at least four grandchildren.

Marine liability insurer. Partner, Thos Miller & Sons

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LEE, Charles Nicholas Percy (La B)

Where are they now: Left La B in 1974, being traced by James Parson (left Pe A 1975). Percy was in the Military Police for a while and then I believe went to live in Singapore with his wife Pritam

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LEEDS, Sir Christopher 1972–1975 (Horsham Staff)

Senior lecturer, University of Nancy

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LEEMING, Richard 1978–1985 (La B, Ma A)

Commercial lawyer. Partner, Burges Salmon

Profile

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LEES, Craig 1996–2003 (La B, Mid A, Th B, Gr W)

Student, University of Wales, Bangor

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LEGATE, Pam 1955–1962 (2's)

A TRIBUTE TO PAM LEGATE (died 14 March 2001)

Image of Pam Legate

A POTTED HISTORY OF PAM (BY HER YOUNGER BROTHER)

The problem with being a younger brother is not knowing a world without your sister - she, however, spent four years and four months without me. I was the interesting diversion, something new to play with. Amongst my earliest memories of her are fishing for tiddlers on Clapham Common and her running around our Streatham flat to the annoyance of the downstairs neighbour. Naturally, Pam did a great job in bringing me up.

I actually discovered in later years that Pam's 56 years amongst us were a bonus. One of the problems of being born during 1944 was that Mr Hitler was inclined to send flying bombs to London. When Pam was only a few months old, she was being bathed in a small tub on a table in front of the living room window. Mum wrapped her in a towel and they left to go to the bathroom. As they turned into the hall, a doodlebug landed in the street and the entire window embedded itself in the opposite wall. They both survived by seconds. Pam spent the remaining months of the war growing up on the south coast.

Due to my ill health, we fortunately left London for the new town of Crawley when Pam was 7. My earliest memory of the new house - in the country! - was a back garden full of huge buttercups. Mum was grateful for the first bunch Pam picked for her. By the time she had delivered the tenth washing-up bowl full, nerves were becoming frayed. The move to Crawley benefited everyone, and our parents spent the rest of their lives in that house. We all enjoyed the long hot summers, when it never rained and we could all play safely in the road outside, but eventually I joined Pam at the local school. In contrast to myself, Pam loved school and soaked up information like a sponge, winning prizes with embarrassing regularity. The move to her next school was problematic. Her I.Q. was alarmingly high and much time was spent discussing the best solution. Eventually a scholarship to Christ's Hospital in Hertford was applied for and obtained and suddenly my sister was gone. We were left in a very quiet house. However, it was not unknown for her to write an occasional letter. In fact I saw very little of my sister between 1955 and 1985, when she returned to Crawley, but I knew she was always there somewhere, a phone-call, or at least a letter away.

Her life at C.H. was a dramatic change as she entered the world of the girls? Boarding School. The occasional visit was a major expedition to far-off Hertford, but we were always given a blow-by-blow account of the previous term during the school holidays. Since some of you here know a lot more about this time than I do, I shall gloss over this time, but suffice it to say that C.H. and the values taught at that school would remain part of my sister, and C.H. would again be part of her life in later years. Pam naturally left with assorted O and A-Levels and a gift for languages, French in particular and very passable German.

By now she wanted to escape the confines of school and see more of the world and her linguistic abilities would hold the key to future travel. Deciding an academic life was not for her, she rejected the "Oxbridge" route, which was hers for the taking, but went instead to the Lycee Francais Secretarial College in Kensington where she trained as a fully bilingual secretary, naturally, leaving armed with her diplomas. Before I knew it, she had decamped to Paris during the mid-Sixties, where she found gainful employment in the Australian embassy. I would love to tell you what she did there, but as she was bound by the official secrets act, I never knew. The only thing I did know was that when she came home for a holiday, or at Christmas, her accent had become Australian and her language caused our mother great embarrassment. Swear words were unknown in our household until then and Pam rarely uttered an expletive either before or after her term of Australian employment.

Eventually she transferred to another embassy in Vienna to help improve her command of German and she fell in love with the city, with plenty of opportunity to ski and a busy social life, courtesy of the local American Marine Guard. For a while she became engaged to one of them, but life as a Marine sergeant's wife in an American military base was not really for Pam and they went their separate ways. Pam returned to the UK and headed to London where she joined the publicity department of WHSmith. Naturally, travel was in short supply, so she eventually decamped to Thomson Holidays where her languages and passport could receive more use.

As well as being an ardent devourer of books by the library-full, she also loved writing, so used her journalistic talents more fully, she branched out on her own and purchased a flat in the Goldhawk Road, setting about finding work within the travel and hotel industry. She loved travel and loved being busy. She always seemed to be disappearing on a press trip to some part of the globe and became something of an authority on the USA, which she visited regularly. She made many good friends within the travel industry, and those people came to know that when Pam became a friend, she was a true friend for life. I always believed that Pam belonged to a different time - a time when people thought more of others than themselves. As many people gathered here know, when Pam promised to do something, she did it; when she said she would be somewhere, she would always be there. I came to understand that when Pam said she would arrive at 7:30, you knew she would be there on the dot of 7:15.

Eventually, Pam realised that she had been away from home for some considerable time and in the mid-80's she moved back to Crawley to be near our parents and also her two small nephews. The prospect of seeing them grow and being the baby-sitting aunt was too much to resist.

As our parents grew older, Pam arranged her work schedule to ensure she could always be there for them at a moments notice and also for her Aunt, who is with us today. Having left London, she bravely learnt to drive in order to run errands and shopping trips for others.

Dad passed away inn 1999 and Pam was left with more time to devote to the Benevolent Society of Old Blues, to assist former pupils of Christ's Hospital, a matter close to her heart. Her final project, which she relished so much, was to write the official history of Christ's Hospital, due for publication this year. Since the whole school had amalgamated into its Horsham base, Pam was often seen interviewing students around the school and became known as "The Lady with the Notebook." Pam was rushed into hospital last year with appendicitis and sadly, unbelievable, cancer was discovered. Chemotherapy followed, but to little avail. In January, Pam was admitted to St. Luke's hospital in Guildford. In typical fashion, she never once expressed any self-pity regarding her condition but was really, really annoyed she could not complete the C.H. book or see the finished product. She never failed to complete anything, ever, it was not in her nature. Pam received a letter stating that the book would be dedicated to her, since she was the embodiment of what it meant to be an "Old Blue." You could tell she was greatly moved, for whenever she was embarrassed she would ridicule the sentiment of it all and profess in a loud and aggrieved tone of voice, "Ridiculous - I don't want a book dedicated to me! How awful." She must have been immensely proud and would have shed a tear or two, but not when anyone was looking.

Her greatest wish was to move to St. Catherine's Hospice, which she eventually did. She died in her sleep on the 16th March, since when I have heard nothing but remarkable tributes to her, words such as 'unique' and 'special' cropping up all the time.

There is little need to list all Pam's qualities as everyone here must be very aware of them anyway, it would take too long to read them out, so in true brotherly fashion, I shall balance the books by confessing her failings as follows 1) Changing light bulbs was a challenge 2) Her prowess with a screwdriver was legendary and 3) electrical products work better if you switch them on. Thus endeth Pam's failings. She has left us now, far too soon, but was happy she had achieved all the things she wished to achieve, the Christ's Hospital book apart. She, naturally, sent all her love to her family, godchildren and friends, and demanded her passing would be a celebration of her life, not a time of sorrow, and left us as she lived her life, with a totally positive attitude. Perhaps, the only thing she did not appreciate is how much she will be missed.

Also involved with the book Christ's Hospital in the Year 2000 - The first ever full colour illustrated book about CH, tracking all aspects of life over the academic year 1999-2000. [publisher?], ?25

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LEIGHTON, D J 1949–1958 (Mid A)

From Chris Bartlett (Col A 41-47) we hear that D J Leighton (Mid A 49-58) has written Montague Druitt: Portrait of a Contender (Hydrangea Publishing, £15), the first full-length biography of the Victorian barrister suspected of being Jack the Ripper. The Ripper website www.Casebook.org says it's well written and nicely published, an excellent overview of the known facts of Druitt's life and death. 'Leighton doesn't believe Druitt was the Ripper, but instead opts for a flavour of the Royal Conspiracy theory as his preferred explanation for the crimes.'

His book Montague Druitt: Portrait of a Contender:

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LEISERACH, Alex 1994–2001 (Th B, Ma A, Gr E)

Stage Management & Technical Theatre student at LAMDA

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LENS, Bernard (Drawing Master early 18th Century)

Artist

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LEONG, Michelle 1994–2001 (Ba B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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LESTER, Peter 1954–1962 (CH)

Solicitor, Sacker & Partners

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LEVIN, Bernard 1937–1945 (Pe B)

Inevitably there were numerous press tributes to (Henry) Bernard Levin (PB 37-45) who died on 7 August aged 75. At his peak he was perhaps the most famous and influential journalist in Britain.

His family were impoverished Lithuanian Jews, living in the backstreets of Camden Town behind St Pancras station. When he was a small boy his father, a tailor, walked out; they met again only once. Levin was raised by his mother and grandparents, winning an LCC scholarship to CH where he was not unduly happy, being one of only four or five Jewish pupils, not good at games, small and insignificant, and entrusted to a terrifying housemaster, the classicist 'Boom' Macnutt (Staff 28-63), whose final verdict on him was merely 'satisfactory'. Levin is remembered for arson (inadvertent, he said), for hanging out a red flag when Labour won the 1945 General Election and (with a future Observer journalist, Ivan Yates (PB 35-44)) for bringing the house down as the two murderous old ladies in Arsenic and Old Lace

He blossomed at the LSE, and via the BBC North American Service and Truth magazine he joined the then mildly radical Spectator and, as 'Taper', pioneered the modern (i.e. irreverent) parliamentary sketch. He became deputy editor and also wrote many campaigning pieces, some directed against the Colonial Office over three Bahrainis unjustly imprisoned on St Helena whose release was a lasting satisfaction to him. At the same time he was the Manchester Guardian's TV critic, and then a savage theatre critic on the Daily Express. From 1962 he was at the Mail as theatre critic and presently feature writer and five-days-a-week columnist.

In 1963 the BBC's late Saturday night satire show That Was The Week That Was made him a household name. As the programme's resident agent provocateur he perched on a barstool uttering inflammatory opinions or interviewed someone in the news in what was then a shockingly abrasive way. Many came to loathe him; he even featured in a Daily Express series entitled 'The Hate Makers' penned by Robert Pitman (PA 34-43). The show went out live and on one occasion the diminutive Levin was assaulted on camera by the husband of an actress he had castigated in a review.

Leaving the Mail in 1970 - the year in which his brilliant book on Britain in the Sixties, The Pendulum Years, was published - he joined The Times in 1971. There he remained for 26 years with one sabbatical, writing well over 2000 lengthy articles, sometimes at the rate of three a week. For some years he was also a book reviewer for The Observer and in the mid-Seventies he returned for a while to theatre reviewing on the Sunday Times.

Levin acquired a remarkable moral authority, campaigning for Soviet dissidents and refuseniks (the former leftwing firebrand had become a vehement anti-Communist), denouncing the apartheid regime in South Africa and human rights violations everywhere. So enraged did the government of Singapore become that in the end it took out a full-page ad in a rival paper, lambasting him. In the UK he opposed trade union abuses, sometimes devoting much of his column to a slate of approved candidates in a union election. Other targets were lawyers (he was blackballed from the Garrick Club after savaging the recently deceased Lord Goddard, ex Lord Chief Justice), Home Secretaries, bankers, bureaucrats, censorship and what would now be called political correctness. His motto was, 'If in doubt, attack'; his main concern was individual freedom.

And his style of writing was unique: long intricate sentences full of parentheses, digressions, semicolons, clauses and sub-clauses, quotations and allusions and Latin tags ? but energetic, passionate and frequently hilarious. One never-to-be-forgotten column listed his mother's tribulations at the hands of the North Thames Gas Board. His range was exceptionally wide: favourite topics included opera (especially Wagner and the Wexford Festival), fine art, haute cuisine (in reaction to the wartime CH diet), antiquities, travel and literature, with Shakespeare and Montaigne particularly cherished.

Levin never married but had a succession of serious relationships with women, most famously Arianna Stassinopoulos, now, as Arianna Huffington, active in US Republican politics. During their years together he explored some unlikely spiritual and self-development movements, enthused over the guru Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and was much mocked for it. Ferocious on paper, he was gentle and generous in person, self-deprecating and (despite the outlandish clothes he favoured) shy, with an immense gift for friendship.

His later broadcasting included a BBC radio series on music festivals, which gave rise to his book Conducted Tour, and three travel series for Channel 4, each with accompanying book. Nine collections of his journalism were published. The last book he wrote was a history of Utopia, A World Elsewhere.

He refused to join the CH Club but returned to CH to judge a debating contest, contributed an affectionate obituary of Roy Macklin (Staff 26-46) to The Blue and in his book Enthusiasms wrote in detail about his schooldays, recalling the pleasures of Chapel services and the joy of studying great literature in the dormitory at first light.

In 1990 he was appointed CBE for services to journalism. Latterly his columns became more concerned with individual responsibility, single-issue fanaticism and (a phrase he coined) the nanny state. He even expressed a fear that the Sixties satirists had helped to trigger the collapse of civility and restraint he saw on the streets. As the first signs of Alzheimer's disease appeared the standard of his writing declined and in 1997 his columns ended, though a handful of other pieces appeared subsequently. Progressively he became a recluse as his once astonishing memory decayed. He was cared for by his companion of many years, Liz Anderson, who survives him.

The Journals of Woodrow Wyatt Volume III edited by Sarah Curtis (Macmillan, ?25) make saddening reference to Bernard Levin (PB 37-45) and his battles with melancholia.

Journalist, author & broadcaster

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LEWIN, William 1854–1856 (CH)

Actor - "Will Terriss"

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LEWIS, Anna 1995–2002 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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LEWIS, Lowell 1994–2001 (Ma B, Th A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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LEWIS, Peter Frank (CH Staff)

On 18th March 2008 at the age of 56, Peter Frank Lewis a member of the Science School at Christ’s

Hospital until 1987, when he moved to Beneden School to become Head of Science where he was still

working until he died.

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LEYTON or LAYTON or WOODGATE, Gregory

Where are they now: Gregory Woodgate who left CH in 1986 and is being sought by his family to ensure he attends his Grandmother's 90th birthday in May 2002

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LILLIE, Judith 1953–1963 (1's, 7's)

Now Judith Thompson, priest

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LINDARS, Frank Edwin (CH circa 1895)

Information

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LING, Arthur 1924–1931 (Pe B)

Architect & town planner

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LINTON, Martin 1954–1964 (Th A)

Labour MP for Battersea

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LINTOTT, Susan 1963–1971 (8's, Almoner)

Bursar, Downing College, Cambridge

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LIPPIATT, Sophie 1999–2001 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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LITTLEWOOD, Sam 1978–1984 (Col B)

Computer game designer

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LITVINSKAITE, Danguole 1995–2002 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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LIVINGSTONE, G F F 1932–1938 (Horsham)

Killed in World War 2

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LIVINGSTONE, Ken (Ex-Almoner)

Greg Rosen's Dictionary of Labour Biography (Politico's, £30) has entries on three OBs and an ex-Almoner (Ken Livingstone). The political economist Stuart Holland (La A 51-59) was 'the main influence behind the more radical policy agenda that emerged in the Labour Party after the disappointments of the 1964-70 Wilson government', while Cabinet minister Michael Stewart (La A 18-25) was 'the safest pair of hands' in that government. Union leader John Edmonds (Mid B 54-62) was affected by Housie's 'atmosphere of snobbery' and 'ethos of being a minor public school'; CH 'did not allow the young man to develop his personality' (but, in fairness, it did help him get into Oxford).

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LLOYD, Michael 1977–1984 (Ma A, Mid A)

Chief Executive, TriNation Management & Development, Romania

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LLOYD, Thomas (CH late 18th century)

Clergyman

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LOCKYER, Christopher D 1968–1975 (Mid B)

BRAILLE! A musical play (Studio Music, price unknown) by David C Clark and Christopher D Lockyer (MdB 68-75) is set in a Paris school for the blind in about 1819 and tells the story of Louis Braille, inventor of the eponymous method of printing for blind people.

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LODGE-PATCH, Edward 1994–2001 (La B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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LOMAX, Robert (CH circa 2003)

Student, Oxford University

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LONGDEN, Harry Leicester 1912–1918 (Mid B)

Major-General

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LONGMATE, Norman 1936–1943 (Pe A)

Author, journalist and broadcaster

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Lord Ezra discusses the proposed sale of CH land

House of Lords, 1999: Lord Ezra discusses the proposed sale of CH land

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LORIMER, Ron 1958–1992 (Horsham Staff)

Horsham Staff

Photo

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LOWE, Peter 1990–1995 (La B, La A)

Email: pgl@yoyo.org

Website: http://pgl.yoyo.org/

Phone: +420 731 624 639 (work) +420 605 266 667 (personal)

Job title: Senior Analyst, Logistics, DHL

Where: Prague, the Czech Republic

Comments: Give us a shout if you're visiting Prague!

Software engineer. Some of his contributions to the "prague tv" website

Taxis in Prague

Obtaining one's Criminal Record

Cost of Living in Prague

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LUGTON, Keith 1953–1960 (Mid A, Governor)

Actuary

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LUMB, Fiona (OB, left circa 1977)

Now Fiona Brown, organist

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LUUTU, Evans 1995–2002 (Pe B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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LYNAM, Charles (CH circa 1840)

Architect

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LYNE, Mark 1970–1976 (Mid B)

Barrister

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LYONS, Rev. Bruce 1949–1954 (Th A)

Where are they now FOUND: Was being sought by William Hughes (Th A 48-54).

Revd. Bruce T. Lyons, Tudor Barn, Spring Street, Wool, Wareham. Dorset BH20 6DB.

Telephone: 01929 462901

bruce@brucelyons2.wanadoo.co.uk

I am retired, whatever that means. At the start of November, we go to Heidelberg for five months, to look after the Anglican church.

In August, I took services in Interlaken for a couple of weeks, meeting Ian Bartholomew in Wengen.

I run enthusiatically in veteran competitions, collecting several bronze and silver medals in the British championships, but not getting the gold that I want, yet.

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MACDONALD, Sandy (Staff, dates?)

Music teacher

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MACKNESS, Keith 1949–1955 (Th B, Governor)

Keith Mackness (TB 49-55, Governor) draws our attention to Stephen Halliday's Making the Metropolis: Creators of Victoria's London (Breedon Books, ?19.99) which states that Sir Charles Barry, architect of the Houses of Parliament, went to school at CH like his collaborator Pugin. Remarkable if true, but the new Oxford Dictionary of National Biography says merely that Barry attended 'three local schools' (his family lived in Westminster - would Newgate Street have been 'local'?). Alfred Barry's 1867 Memoir of Sir Charles describes all three without naming any: the first was 'a mere preparatory school'; the second was run by a 'very dissolute' master who sometimes absented himself for weeks on end; the third 'attempted only mechanical teaching and severe discipline.' Schools one and two don't sound like CH, but school three may be a candidate, the more so as Barry acquired there 'a remarkably beautiful handwriting' which he could have learnt in our Writing School. His father was prosperous but that wouldn't have stopped Barry attending CH as a private pupil (again like Pugin) or, as Keith suggests, gaining a place there via financial sleight-of-hand. Alternatively his father's death in 1805 may have left a good part of his wealth inaccessible until his children reached their majority, leaving the family in genuine need. Can anyone tell us more? Halliday's book also has much to say about Sir Henry Cole (CH 1817-23), his deep involvement with Prince Albert and others in bringing the 1851 Great Exhibition building to fruition and his directing of its profits to the South Kensington Museums. Cole was the first Director of the V & A and raised money for building the Albert Hall. Mentioned too is a notorious CH Governor, Leopold Redpath, who frustrated a bid to build a London underground railway in the 1850s by embezzling the funds earmarked for it. He was one of the last convicts to be transported to Australia.

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MACLAGAN, Alison 1980–1987 (8's, 5's, Ba B)

Now Alison Branch, pharmacist

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MACNUTT, Derrick 1928–1963 (Horsham Staff)

Reprinted from the 1966 original, Ximenes on the Art of the Crossword (Swallowtail Books, £7.95) now has a foreword by Colin Dexter. Ximenes was the nom de plume of Derrick Macnutt (Horsham Staff 28-63), and his book, recommended by Tim Moorey in The Week, gives an enlightening conducted tour through the process of composing a crossword and sets out the principles of sound and fair clueing, as followed today by most setters. Julian Sheppard (Mid A 39-47) who sent this item says he's not sure 'sound and fair' was the phrase that came to mind when Macnutt set him homework in the Forties.

Crossword compiler

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MADDOX, Simon 1996–2002 (Pe B, Mid B, Th A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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MADDREN, Clare 1999–2001 (Ba A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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MADDREN, James (OB, left 2005)

Percussionist

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MAGEE, Bryan 1941–1948 (Ba A)

The latest work by Bryan Magee (Ba A 41-48) is Wagner and Philosophy (Allen Lane, £20). A review in The Times on 22 November recalled his earlier book Aspects of Wagner - 'hugely authoritative, with a scholarship and love of the subject hardly paralleled in English.'

Clouds of Glory: A Hoxton Childhood
'Childhood reminiscences which will strike a deep chord with anyone brought up in the East End of London or in any other large inner city of the Thirties and Forties, prior to the post-war rebuilding.' Jonathan Cape hbk £17.99 hbk, Pimlico pbk £7.99

Philosopher, politician, broadcaster

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MAHMOUDI, Homan 1994–2001 (La B, Mid B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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MAINE, Sir Henry 1829–1840 (CH)

"Twenty scholars combined under editor Alan Diamond to write The Victorian Achievement of Sir Henry Maine (CH 1829-40) (Cambridge University Press, £75), which examines Maine's views on social and political progress, his anthropological and social scientific works, his legal and jurisprudential thought, and his writings on Indian affairs (he served as the legal member of the Governor-General's Council in the 1860s)."

Jurist & historian

His lectures on International Law

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MALCOLM, Rosalind 1967–1973 (5's)

Statutory Nuisance: Law and Practice (OUP, £45) is written jointly by John Pointing and Rosalind Malcolm (5's 67-73), Surrey University's Director in Law; they view statutory nuisance as an area of law that's 'ripe for root and branch reform'.

Barrister & university teacher

Her book Statutory Nuisance: Law and Practice

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MALINS, Edward 1933–1959 (Horsham Staff)

Horsham Staff

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MALONE, Stanley 1962–1990 (Horsham Staff, Governor)

Yachtsman

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MANNERS, Andrew 1971–1977 (Mid B)

Teacher

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MANNION-DANIELS, Olivia 1999–2001 (Col B, Gr W)

Where are they now: Being traced by Chris Goodyer who was with her at the British School of Brussels (until 1999)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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MANSERGH, David 1989–1996 (Mid B)

Engineering student, Cambridge University

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MARCH, Richard (Dickie) 1945–1951 (Pe A)

Richard (Dickie) March (Peele A 45-51). Born 16th April 1935, died 30th June 2007.

Richard March died tragically as a consequence of a fire at his home in Woking. Neither he nor his wife had been in the best of health over the previous few years. At the time he was alone, his wife being in respite care.

Richard came from sturdy Geordie stock, his father being a professional footballer. At the time of his entry to CH as an LCC scholar the family were living in Shepherd’s Bush, his father having transferred to Queens Park Rangers. During Richard’s time at CH his mother died unexpectedly , also as a result of a tragic accident in the home.

Like many of his generation Richard left at 16 to make his way in the City. He joined the Price & Pierce Group, agents & brokers for forest products, with whom he built a successful business career in the marketing and importing of sawn goods.

National Service was served with the Rifle Brigade. He was a member of the battalion advance party when it was ordered to the Far East but got only as far as Singapore when the orders were changed to deploy in Kenya. He spent the remainder of his service in operations against the Mau Mau insurgency and for which he was awarded the General Service Medal.

On demobilisation his first promotion took him to Manchester. At the time, this busy sales office numbered three Old Blues among its eight staff, all of whom became Managing Directors of their respective operational companies. He met and, in 1960, married Joyce. Chris Pearson (Mid A 42-48), with whom at the time he was sharing a flat, was Best Man.

Richard turned out regularly for Old Blue RFC sides where he played in the scrum as hooker. After his move north, he played for Manchester RFC, for some seasons in the 1st XV, in the same position. He was a Member of the MCC and played cricket for the Flemish Giants XI, a side touring the village greens of Surrey and Sussex.

On promotion, Richard returned to the London Headquarters of Price & Pierce, where his career continued to advance until the mid 1980s when the Company was sold to repay the loans of the controlling shareholder. The new owners did not bring the same dedication to the Price & Pierce ethos, with the consequence that the business began to disintegrate. Richard himself left in 1991 taking up, until his retirement, a position managing and integrating exports of timber from the ‘glasnost’ freed Baltic States.

He was Hon. Secretary to the Stewards of Founder's Day during part of the 100 years celebrations and was responsible for organising two successful dinners. He retired from this post at the onset of his period of ill-health.

Richard was a loyal and dedicated supporter of Christ’s Hospital, Old Blues, Rifle Brigade and the MCC. At his funeral, wreaths in their colours, together with his club and regimental ties were laid on the coffin. He is survived by his wife and two sons.

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MARCHAM, Frederick George (CH circa World War I)

Another American publication: from the DeWitt Historical Society comes The Photographs of Frederick G Marcham ($21.95). Marcham, who attended CH circa World War I, was a beloved teacher of English history at Cornell University for sixty-nine years and mayor of the nearby village of Cayuga Heights for thirty-two. His other enduring passion was photography: he took pictures of life in England, athletes at Cornell, his farm outside Ithaca and a range of other subjects. This selection of ninety pictures, plus biographical notes and photos of Marcham, has been compiled by his son John who suggests his father's skill as a photographer arose from 'an early attraction to fine paintings, the empathy with people that made him a successful teacher, and a lifelong love of nature.' Marcham died in 1992, unnoticed by The Blue.

Professor of English Literature, Cornell University

His book Sources of English Constitutional History

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MARILLIER, Harry C 1875–1884 (10's)

The Times review (22 November) of The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde (Fourth Estate, £35) referred to Wilde's friendship with Harry Marillier (CH c. 1880). 'What is Harry doing? Is he reading Shelley in a land of moonbeams and mystery? Or rowing in Babylonish garments on the river?'

Art historian, journalist, tapestry expert

His book on Dante Gabriel Rossetti - note references to Dr Thomas Gordon Hake (CH 1816-24) on pages 153-4 & 183

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MARK, Annabelle 1963–1969 (nee Parfitt, 3's, 5's)

Middlesex University's Professor of Healthcare Management Annabelle L Mark (Parfitt, 3's, 5's 63-69) was the founding academic of the conference 'Organizational Behaviour in Healthcare', held this year for the fourth time, and co-edits a book derived from last year's gathering, Leading Health Care Organizations (Palgrave Macmillan, £50). Her essay Colouring the Kaleidoscope: Emotion in Health Care Organisation is available from the Nuffield Trust, price £4.

Annabelle L Mark (Parfitt, 3's, 5's 63-69) is co-editor with Sue Dopson of Organisational Behaviour in Health Care: The Research Agenda (Macmillan Business, price unknown) and contributes a chapter on 'Managerial and professional solutions for professions allied to medicine'.

Professor of Healthcare Organisation

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MARKLAND, Jeremiah (CH circa 1710)

Classical scholar

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MARLAND, Michael 1944–1953 (Th A)

The headmaster and educationist Michael Marland (Th A 44-53) has died aged 73.

His Guardian obituary:

Michael Marland, who has died of cancer at the age of 73, was a colourful and charismatic headteacher, and a vigorous advocate of the comprehensive ideal. A champion of the educative power of the arts and of multilingual education, a pioneer in school management and pastoral care, and the author of a seminal teaching manual, he made his greatest mark as founder headteacher of North Westminster community school, London, from 1980 until his retirement in 1999.

Michael's vision and leadership of North Westminster completely justified the term community school, reaching far beyond the traditional educational parameters. Pupils were treated as full members of the community, while staff development included regular discussion of educational articles and invitations to meals with the school's many, often prominent, guests. Michael led from the front in matters of curriculum and pedagogy, initiating and teaching, for example, a core course in the area of "science, technology and society", which examined the practical impact of science on everyday life. It reflected his desire to make subjects relevant to his pupils' lives, and to escape traditional specialisation.

Similarly, he tried to break down the barriers between pupils' home lives and their time at school, introducing liaison officers whose role was to enhance communication with parents over pupil performance and misbehaviour.

His energy was relentless and inspiring. Even when walking (his preferred mode of transport) between the school's three sites, he would talk endlessly into his trusty Dictaphone, producing masses of material for his secretaries to type. They, in turn, tried to keep his perambulations to a minimum.

A generous host, sartorially elegant in his trademark bow-tie, Michael was always prepared to share his own cogent views on any educational topic that arose. He was especially committed to the performing arts, and the studio theatre that he established at the school not only provided a venue for performances by pupils and the wider local community, but also attracted professional and international artists. He was skilled in the art of persuasion, and charmed prominent writers, including Margaret Drabble, Keith Waterhouse and Fay Weldon, to visit the school to judge short-story competitions and talk to pupils about their work, while international opera stars Jessye Norman and Willard White graced the school with performances.

Michael was born in London, but was proud of his parents' working-class roots in Mosley, Manchester. His father was a pianist for the bandleader Henry Hall. Michael's formidable mother gained a governor-sponsored place for him at Christ's Hospital school, Horsham, Sussex, where his reputation as a bon viveur was established: he was once observed ascending from the staff kitchen in a dumb-waiter, firmly clutching two bottles of red wine.

He went on to read English and history at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge (1954-57), where he was president of the university amateur dramatic club and a founder member of the musical comedy association: he was also one of the few undergraduates to father twins while completing his studies - he married his first wife, Eileen, in 1955.

Six years later, he was appointed head of English at Abbey Wood school in south-east London, taking on the same role in 1964 at nearby Crown Woods school, where he subsequently became director of studies, and his inclusive approach began to make an impact. In 1971, Michael was appointed headteacher of Woodberry Down school in north-east London, and nine years later went to North Westminster. A measure of the impact he had there comes from the hundreds of former staff and pupils who have joined a Facebook group set up in his memory.

Michael's energy found numerous outlets beyond his immediate responsibilites. He was an influential member of the Bullock committee on the teaching of English, whose report, A Language for Life (1975), recommended that "every secondary school should develop a policy for language across the curriculum". He was founder chair of the National Association for Pastoral Care in Education and of the Royal Opera House education committee. Recognition of his service led to a CBE in 1977 and honorary awards from the universities of Kingston (2000), Surrey Roehampton (2001) and the Institute of Education, University of London (2002).

Books were an essential part of his life and he served as chair of the Books in the Curriculum research project and the National Textbook Reference Library steering committee. In the capacity of general editor, he oversaw the Longman Imprint books, which brought the works of postwar writers Stan Barstow, Doris Lessing and Alan Sillitoe into secondary school classrooms, and the Heinemann Organisation in Schools series, while his own books covered every aspect of school life, from the teaching of English and pastoral care to school management and marketing.

His deep love of the music of Benjamin Britten led him and his young family to move to a ramshackle farmhouse in Suffolk in the 1960s and turn it into a home - and, typical of Michael, a venue for staff conferences and the place where he worked on his many books and reports.

Of his own works, the most influential was The Craft of the Classroom: A Survival Guide to Classroom Manage-ment in the Secondary School. First published in 1975, this slim volume immediately became an essential resource for prospective and practising teachers alike and was updated for the third time in 2003. Its final paragraph provides the key to understanding both the personality of a man who enriched the lives of everyone he met, and the reasons for his success. "The craft won't work without a spirit compounded of the salesman, the music-hall performer, the parent, the clown, the intellectual, the lover and the organiser, but the spirit won't win through on its own either. Method matters. The more 'organised' you are, the more sympathetic you can be. The better your classroom management, the more help you can be to your pupils."

Other volumes included Multilingual Britain: The Educational Challenge (1987), which sought to demonstrate the nation's mutilingual heritages and the extent of multilingual education in the world today. Throughout the 1990s, he wrote a much-admired column on education for the Guardian.

On retiring from North Westminster, Michael continued to be in demand as a speaker, consultant, editor and author. One of the proudest achievements of this period took place near his home in Islington, north London, where he hosted an event at the Union Chapel and helped secure the mounting of a plaque in Upper Street to commemorate the residents of Highbury Corner killed by a V1 bomb in 1944.

Michael's commitment to intercultural dialogue continued outside the boundaries of school life as he served as patron of the Tagore Foundation and as vice-chair of the City of Westminster Race Equality Council. He had recently completed work as series editor of the Cambridge Collections, a set of fiction, non-fiction and themed anthologies.

Eileen died in a car accident in 1968, as did his eldest son Edgell in 1990. A second marriage, to Rose, was dissolved in 1977. Michael married Linda, a fellow teacher, in 1989. Their son Matthew, born the following year, allowed Michael, already a grandfather, to rediscover the joys of parenthood.

He is survived by Linda, Matthew, and his sons Oliver, Tim, Ben and daughter Folly from his first marriage.

· Michael Marland, educationist, born December 28 1934; died July 3 2008

Reproduced from the Guardian website

Once a high-profile state school head, Michael Marland (Th A 44-53) was editor of the Heinemann School Management series and wrote the volume on Managing the Arts in the Curriculum (Heinemann, £17.25) jointly with Rick Rogers.

Headmaster and educationalist

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MARLER, William George (Will) (CH 1890s)

Plumber, docker and stevedore

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MARLES, Vaughn 1990–1997 (Pe A)

Film maker & kung fu teacher

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MARLING, Edith Nancy 1937–1948 (Horsham Staff - Peele Matron)

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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MARONEY, Mich 1973–1978 (1's)

Artist

Her London exhibition in 2005 on CH Forum

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MARSH, Joanna 1997–2002 (Staff)

Organist

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MARTIN, Christopher 1956–1963 (La A)

Chaplain, Lyons Anglican Church, France

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MARTIN, Roger (Ba B 1947-1955, Horsham Staff 1963-68, 1972-96)

Horsham Staff

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MARTIN, Sir Richard 1594–1602 (President)

Lord Mayor of London

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MARTINELLI, Alexandra 2000–2002 (Col B, Gr W)

Drama & French student, Bristol University

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MARTINELLI, Anna 1999–2001 (Col B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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MARTLAND, Gemma 1994–2001 (LH A, Gr E)

Chemistry student, Cardiff University

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MASON, Shaun 1989–1989 (Staff)

Staff

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MASON, Victoria 2000–2002 (LH A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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MASTERSON, Guy 1972–1979 (Mastroianni, Pe A)

Actor, director, impresario

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MATHEWS, Adrian 1987–1988 (Staff)

Adrian Mathews (Staff 87-88) is working on a novel for Pan Macmillan entitled The Apothecary's House. It will be his third published volume of fiction.

This year's edition of Wisden Cricketers' Almanack contains an article by Robin Marlar on Sussex's victory in the 2002 County Championship. 'It was a masterstroke to bring down the 105-strong Christ's Hospital marching band on the last day- Even now the memory of the blue cassocks and yellow stockings striding the outfield and the crowd singing the chorus, "You may tell them all/That we stand or fall/For Sussex by the sea", can bring a tear to a rheumy old eye.'

Another author with a third novel out is Adrian Mathews (Staff 87-88). In The Apothecary's House (Macmillan, £16.99) an old woman storms into the Rijks Museum in Amsterdam demanding the return of a painting looted by the Nazis. Within days the female archivist who takes up her cause starts to receive anonymous threats, her home is attacked, and she enters into a series of increasingly lethal adventures as she investigates the painting's secret symbolism.

Novelist & poet

1996 interview

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MATSON, Betty 1932–1940 (6's)

Teacher & naturalist

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MATTHEWS, Guy 1994–2001 (La B, Pe A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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MATTHEWS, Nathan 1994–2001 (La B, Ma A, Gr E)

Stage manager

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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MAUDSLAY, Richard 1954–1956 (La B)

Congratulations to Richard Maudslay (La B 56-64) who received a CBE for services to business in the North East in the Queen's Birthday Honours list 2006.

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MAUGHAN, Hannah 1985–1992 (Col A)

Textile designer

Cornwall art

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MAURICE, Edward Beauclerk 1922–1930 (CH)

The Last of the Gentlemen Adventurers: Coming of Age in the Arctic, the memoirs of the late Edward Beauclerk Maurice (CH 22-30) who became a fur trader among the Eskimos at the age of sixteen, will be published by Fourth Estate in April.

Fur trader with the Hudson's Bay Company

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MAX NORMAL, (Gordon Miles) 1976–1983 (Mid B)

Circus performer & street entertainer - MAX NORMAL

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MAXIM, Jon 1976–1982 (Col B)

Advertising man in Australia

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MAY, Daniel 1995–2002 (Pe B, Mid A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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MAYHEW, Alice-Rose 1997–2001 (Ba A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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MAYNARD, Julian 1976–1983 (La B)

His photo in 2003

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MAYNE, Philip 1911–1919 (Pe A)

Philip Mayne (Pe A 11-19), the last surviving British officer of World War One and perhaps the oldest Old Blue of all time, has died aged 107.

Read his obituary in The Independent.

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MAYOR, John E B 1832–1836 (CH)

Rhona Mitchell (Archivist & Museum Officer 99-02) appears in Tomalin's acknowledgments, and among the book's sources are three histories of CH as well as Maritime Supremacy and the Opening of the Western Mind by Peter Padfield (TA 41-48/9) and Cambridge Under Queen Anne edited by the eccentric scholar J E B Mayor (CH 1830s).

The 75th birthday of the Cambridge classicist E J Kenney (CA 35-43, Senior Grecian, Treasurer 84-86) was marked by a festschrift entitled Amor: Roma. Love & Latin Literature (Cambridge Philological Society, Supplementary Volume 22, price unknown). The journal Scholia called it 'a tribute demonstrating personal affection, long familiarity, and great care in the making.' Volume 20 of the same series (Juvenal's Mayor: the Professor who lived on 2d. a day by John Henderson) is also about an Old Blue: John E B Mayor (CH 1832/3-36), Professor of Latin at Cambridge from 1872 until 1910.

Cambridge scholar & vegetarian campaigner

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McCALLION, Anna 1953–1962 (Tracey, 5's, 6's)

Painter

Artists website

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McCausland, D A C (Tony) 1937–1943 (Barnes B)

Tony’s father, who was in the Malayan Civil service, died when he was only 7.Because of this, the Colonial Office gave Tony a presentation to C.H. He was very skilled with his hands, and found his natural place and interest in the manual school. He finally left C.H. in December 1943, taking up an apprenticeship in mechanical engineering with General Electric at Rugby, and studying for further qualifications at night school. After the war he went to Portugal to work on the hydro-electric dam in Castella de Bode, where he met his future wife, Sheila. They were married in Edinburgh in 1954. Tony then worked on the Hydro-electric scheme at Loch Fyne.

In 1962 he joined Shell at Egham, working as a research scientist on hydro-carbons. In 1977 when this plant closed, he relocated to Thornton Research near Ellesmere Port .until he retired. Tony had a deep interest in Spiritual matters, serving in various capacities in the Churches they attended.

When he was about 30 ,he developed symptoms which were later diagnosed as Ankylosing Spondylitis. This resulted in many visits to hospital, and progressive disablement. Despite this he held down his jobs until normal retirement age. He was well respected by colleagues. His resilience and recovery from numerous operations to return to work, was a source of admiration.

In all this he found time to do a B.A. in religious studies with the Open University.

It seemed that during his time working on hydro-electric dams, he inhaled asbestos, which was widely used then in their construction. This was a contributory factor to his last illnesses.

Tony was a much loved man, particularly by his family. He leaves his wife Sheila, his three daughters Anne, Alison and Barbara, and four granddaughters.

Contributed by his brother P E C McCausland (Ba.B 1940-49)

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McCOMAS, Henry Claude 1938–1940 (Horsham Staff)

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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McCRACKEN, Frank 1948–1950 (Horsham Staff)

Teacher

Link to obituary

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McDONALD, Alexandra 2000–2002 (Ba A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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McHUGH, Clara 2000–2002 (Col A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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McINERNY, Christopher (CH circa 1976-83)

Information

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McINERNY, James 1942–1952 (Ba B)

Banker. Cricketer (Oxford University)

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McINERNY, Nicholas 1972–1979 (Th B)

Dramatist

His diary of a playwriting masterclass in 2000

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McINROY, Justin 1994–2001 (Th B, Ma A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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McINTYRE, Cdr. (Mac) J.P. - R.N. of Devoran Cornwall 1916–1923 (La A)

Died in January 2004.

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McKELVEY, Malcolm 1962–1985 (Horsham Staff, Governor)

Christmas Preludes for Manuals (Kevin Mayhew, £15.99) includes three organ pieces by Malcolm McKelvey (Director of Music 62-85, Governor) and one by Christopher Tambling (Pe A 76-82). Both are former Organ Scholars of St Peter's College, Oxford.

Obituary

Malcolm McKelvey, the music teacher and choirmaster who has died aged 79, helped to mould the talent of some of Britain's leading figures in the world of classical music; his best known alumni include Charles Hazlewood, the broadcaster and conductor, Simon Joly, the conductor of the BBC Singers from 1989 to 1995, and Paul Hoskins, the Music Director of the Rambert Dance Company.

McKelvey was a musician of remarkable natural gifts, and his sight-reading and interpretation of a score, whether at the organ or the piano, were of the highest level. A fine choral trainer and a communicative and powerful conductor, he decided early in his career that his vocation was as a teacher of music in public schools, and he went on to become a popular and respected choirmaster.

Malcolm McKelvey was born at Birkenhead on May 26 1926. At the age of four he insisted on being allowed to learn the piano like his much older brother. By the time he was 15, and a schoolboy at Park High School, he was already organist of St Peter's, Rock Ferry.

In July 1944, aged only 18, he became an Associate of the Royal College of Organists (ARCO), shortly before being called up. The war then took him as organist to the garrison in Malta.

In 1947 he became organ scholar at St Peter's Hall, Oxford. His tutor, Bernard Rose, who later ran the Magdalen choir for nearly three decades, was also recently out of the Army, and became a lifelong friend.

By the time McKelvey left Oxford, having married his first wife, Mimi, he was set on a career in teaching, as opposed to the less secure path of the performing musician.

In 1951 he was appointed Assistant Director of Music at Wrekin College in Shropshire, becoming a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists (FRCO) the following year. He later became Director of Music, and stayed at Wrekin until 1958, when he and his family moved to Brighton College, a mixed day and boarding school, where he stayed for four years.

But despite McKelvey's charm and powers of persuasion, he found it an uphill struggle to match the results he had achieved at Wrekin.

In 1962 he became the first married Director of Music at Christ's Hospital at Horsham, Sussex, where he stayed until 1985.

There he would single-handedly lead 800 boys through their compulsory weekly Saturday morning hymn practice, accompanying them on an upright piano. He also managed the wide range of personalities in his department with great effectiveness, and was a meticulous and prodigious record-keeper.

His influence extended beyond the school gates, and his lively approach was well-suited to teaching adult evening classes. In 1971 he founded the Horsham Symphony Orchestra, which is now in its third decade.

McKelvey played with many great musicians, who valued his company and his musicianship. George Malcolm, the harpsichordist, visited him regularly; the oboist Evelyn Rothwell, Lady Barbirolli, described him as the best accompanist she had ever worked with; while the composer Sydney Carter entrusted him with a live broadcast of his works.

After leaving Christ's Hospital, McKelvey increased his activity as an adjudicator and examiner for the Associated Board. He was an active council member at the Royal College of Organists.

Composing for choir and for organ also became more of a preoccupation. His compositions were deeply rooted in his religious faith, but also in the practical needs of church communities.

His last regular musical role was as director of music at St Mary's Church at Prestbury, Gloucestershire, where he moved with his second wife. He died on December 29.

McKelvey's last six years were overshadowed by his struggle against Alzheimer's, but he leaves a rich legacy of published compositions, and he influenced many students of all ages. Above all he understood the power of music, and of church music in particular, to unite and strengthen communities.

He is survived by his second wife, Christine, two daughters and two sons.

Text from Telegraph news website.

Director of music

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McKENNA, Frank 1986–1986 (Staff)

Staff

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McKENNA, Professor Antony 1955–1962 (Mid A)

Professor Antony McKenna (MdA 55-62) is editor of Pierre Bayle: Te moin et conscience de son temps (Honore Champion, 80.80), thirteenth volume of the Vie des Huguenots collection of which he is director. McKenna is also co-director of La Lettre Clandestine and editor of its ninth volume, Les Formes Litteraires dans les Manuscrits Philosophiques Clandestin (Universite de Paris-Sorbonne, price unknown). Another recent book, Libertinage et Philosophie au XVIIe siscle 5: Les libertins et la masque: simulation et representation, derives from a conference which he co-organised, and is published by the Universite de Saint-Etienne where he teaches.

French scholar. Some of his writings:

Bayle et la superstition

L'Eclaircissement sur les pyrrhoniense

Hommage to Elisabeth Labrousse

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McKENZIE FRASER, T M (CH early 19th Century)

Presbyterian minister

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McKIE, David 1945–1953 (Col A)

Jabez: The Rise and Fall of a Victorian Rogue (Atlantic, £12.99) by the veteran Guardian journalist David McKie (Col A 45-53) recounts the career of Jabez Spencer Balfour, a politician and financier who fled to South America when his fraudulent Liberator Building Society collapsed in 1889. He was eventually dragged back to Britain after a high-speed train chase and spent fourteen years in prison. McKie touches on the parallels with such later names as Maxwell, Archer, Enron and WorldCom.

Journalist & author

Book, Jabez: The Rise and Fall of a Victorian Rogue

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McKIE, Simon 1967–1974 (Th B)

Chartered accountant and tax adviser

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McLEAN, Andre, BM, BCh, PhD FRCPath, UCL Medical School 1942–1949 (Col A)

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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McLEOD, Roderick Donald 1897–1905 (13's, Col B)

Colonial administrator

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McTURK, Jim 1953–1962 (Prep B, Th A)

Died 31 August 2003 aged 59 years.

Born in Bridlington, the son of a Lieutenant Commander of the Royal Navy, the family moved to Somerset when he was very young. His father died when he was five and they returned to Bridlington to live. His mother heard of CH and approached the RAF Benevolence Society for assistance in getting a place for Jim, while his younger brother John went to Hurstpierpoint.

He thoroughly enjoyed his time at CH. Friends remember him as a cheeky chap, always upbeat and smiling. He took A' levels in history and geography and excelled at Manual School. His work was often on display at Speech Day and Parent's Day. One of his finest projects, still in constant use at the family home to this day, was a 6.5ft oak refectory dining table, which he made from seasoned oak planks that had lain in the CH timber store since the 1930s. He took an active part in most house sports and played scrum half at rugby. He was also fast on the track, once winning an 800m race having run it thinking it was only 400m.

On leaving CH, he spent a brief spell in the Army before moving on to work as a trainee manager for a furniture maker in Hertford, Wood Bros 'Old Charm'. Whilst living in Hertford, he met Joan and they were married in 1968. He was then to take up a post at Addis Ltd in Hertford and a course in work-study, time and motions at Hatfield Tech cycling the 15 miles there every evening. This led him onto taking a post with ITT, in Harlow and later Kent in work-study, where he would spend much time analysing the manufacturing processes of telephone components and looking for ways to improve speed and effectiveness. Frustrated with the inherent inefficiencies of the Company and unable to make headway due to the prevalence of trade unions at that time, he began to look around for a career that would satisfy his artistic skills, and so in 1973 he moved back to Bridlington to head the family firm of monumental masons where he spent the rest of his working life.

While his experience lay in carpentry, his creative flair and staunch dedication meant that he was quickly able to turn his hand to stone carving and produced many fine pieces in his profession. He diversified the business to include bespoke fireplaces and restoration work, and worked for many years on the Priory Church in Bridlington. He made stone masks of the Rector and the churchwardens, which were placed, above the south clerestory. This attracted interest from national newspapers and television. He produced yards and yards of carved decoration at the roof parapet level, which he jokingly called his 'Charles and Diana frieze' ? his ears and her hairstyle. He was involved in projects at the Settrington Estate and spent most of one summer actively building the Tempietto ? claimed to be the largest private garden feature built in this country for over 100 years. His work was always of the highest standard paying great attention to detail. His designs were ambitious and forward thinking whilst maintaining a great respect for history and tradition. He was not motivated by financial gain; rather his philosophy was that if a job was worth doing, it was worth doing well.

On hearing that there was to be a Commemoration stone to mark the merger of boys and girls at CH, he set about designing a few proposals and promptly offered his services, although CH had already enlisted the help of a very talented female stonemason.

Perhaps his biggest achievement was the design and building of the family home in 1981. He also handcrafted all the doors, windows, stone sills and internal woodwork. He made most of the household furniture to such high quality that friends and relations pestered him to make them furniture, which he gladly did.

Never one to rest on his laurels, he always had many projects on the go, diligently seeing each one through to completion. Over the last 5 years of his life, he spent much of his leisure time building a 7ft high brick wall around the family home complete with stone capping, stretching the perimeter of some 500ft. For relaxation, he could be found patiently making model trains, ships, houses and scenery for his model railway layout. He was also a keen gardener and an avid reader, with a great interest in history worldwide.

He was an articulate and passionate speaker and had been Chairman of the Young Conservative Party in Hertford as a young man. More recently, he lectured for the National Association of Monumental Masons (NAMM) to local councils on headstone safety and stability. He was on the technical committee for NAMM and was frequently asked to stand as the National President, although his wife persuaded him not to take any more commitments as he was already pushing himself to the limits.

He was a devoted father and went to great lengths to help his children, Adam and Sophie obtain places at CH, keen that they should enjoy the same great benefits that he had received. He also helped to secure the late entrance of his nephew following the tragic death of his younger brother John. He loved to hear their tales of boarding school life and would in turn regal them with his own fond memories: he spent an Easter Sunday at CH one year when Easter fell in term time, collecting chocolate eggs hidden around the school; he was a devotee of the 'Kirby Walk' trailing him and his dog 'Chlorine' for miles around the school and beyond.

His diagnosis of lung cancer earlier this year came as a great shock to him, but he faced it with courage and dignity. He will be remembered by many for his integrity, sharp wit and sense of humour, and his willingness to help and advise others where he could. It is a great shame that he did not live into his retirement to enjoy the fruits of a lifetime of hard work. Some of his work will stand for centuries to come, a fitting tribute to his remarkable talent.

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MEEKS, Michael 1988–1995 (Ma A, Ma B)

Working for Novell

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MEEKS, Thomas 1995–2002 (Ma B, Ma A, Gr E)

Student, Southampton University

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MEIGGS, Russell 1912–1921 (Ma B, Senior Grecian, Horsham Staff 1920s)

Several OBs appear in Robert Runcie: The Reluctant Archbishop by Humphrey Carpenter (Sceptre, ?7.99). In wartime Oxford Runcie was in the Officers' Training Corps and was taught map-reading by Edmund Blunden (CA 09-15, Senior Grecian) 'in a very fey kind of way; you couldn't hear what he was saying most of the time.' Back at Oxford after the war he attended Ancient History lectures by Russell Meiggs (MB 12-21, Senior Grecian, Horsham Staff 20s), a 'really wonderful man'. As Archbishop of Canterbury he chose as his chief of staff Ross Hook (BB, LB 28-36, Almoner c. 80-88) whom the present Bishop of London recalls as 'a large personality who was mis-cast as an administrative assistant.' Hook's wife Ruth did a lot of ghost-writing for Runcie. Mention is made of the book Hostage: the complete story of the Lebanon captives by Con Coughlin (PB 66-73).

Ancient historian

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MEMBERY, York 1973–1980 (La B)

Freelance journalist & author

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MENON, Patricia 1954–1961 (Mitchell, 2's)

Patricia Menon (Mitchell, 2's 54-61) has taught English at Niagara College and Brock University, Ontario, Canada,and has now had a volume of literary criticism published: Austen, Eliot, Charlotte Bronte and the Mentor-Lover (Palgrave Macmillan £45). Three teachers at CH Hertford - Frances Mercer, Helen Shackleton and Audrey Cleobury Sunderland - are gratefully included in the acknowledgements.

Teacher in Canada

Book, Austen, Eliot, Charlotte Bronte and the Mentor-Lover

Her views on homosexual marriage - scroll to foot of page

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MERCER, Frances (Staff, Unknown years)

Patricia Menon (Mitchell, 2's 54-61) has taught English at Niagara College and Brock University, Ontario, Canada,and has now had a volume of literary criticism published: Austen, Eliot, Charlotte Bronte and the Mentor-Lover (Palgrave Macmillan £45). Three teachers at CH Hertford - Frances Mercer, Helen Shackleton and Audrey Cleobury Sunderland - are gratefully included in the acknowledgements.

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MEYER, Henry Hoppner (? Non-Foundationer 1790s)

Portrait painter

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MICHELL, Sir Lewis 1852–1858 (Unknown details)

There are frequent appearances by Sir Lewis Michell (CH 1852-58) in The History of the Rhodes Trust 1902-99 edited by Anthony Kenny (OUP, £60). The Trust is best known for bringing scholars from the US and (former) British Empire to study at Oxford. Sir Lewis, chairman of De Beers and the friend, banker and biographer of Cecil Rhodes, was one of its original trustees.

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MICOURIS, Nick 1989–1996 (Pe B, Pe A)

Director, Lost in TV Ltd

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MIDDLETON, Peter 1971–1977 (La B)

Managing director, CRE:8 Multimedia Ltd

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MILES, GORDON (MAX NORMAL) 1976–1983 (Mid B)

Circus performer & street entertainer

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MILLER, Chris 1954–1966 (Horsham Staff)

Headmaster, The Doon School, India

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MILLER, David 1963–1972 (La A)

Priest

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MILLER, David 1948–1955 (La B)

David Miller was at Christ's Hospital (Prep B/Lamb B) from 1948 to 1955, and holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the Open University (1992), in which he specialised in modern history, including courses on nuclear weapons and conflict in the contemporary world.

He was a professional soldier from 1956 to 1991, and served in Malaya, Singapore (twice), Germany (twice), the Netherlands and the Falkland Islands (after the conflict). During the past thirty years he has had 70 books published , some of which have been translated into Chinese, Danish, French, German, Japanese, and Swedish. Published titles include: The Wreck of the Isabella; Lady De Lancey at Waterloo; Richard the Lionheart - The Mighty Warrior (Third Crusade); The Duchess of Richmond’s Ball; The Cold War, A Military History; Mercy Ships; and Janes’s Major Warships, 1997 (2 volumes). Other work includes numerous titles on submarines, tanks, warships, and even American churches. He worked as a journalist for Jane’s Information Group from 1993 to 1997, where he produced a monthly magazine, Despatches, and was Naval Editor of "International Defense Review" (1993-1995). For Christ's Hospital he wrote "Barnes Wallis and the RAF Foundationers' Trust" and has most recently completed a history of the Old Blues who died in World War Two, which will be published in 2011.

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MILNER-SMITH, Guy 1988–1995 (Mid B)

Information

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MILWARD, Peter R S 1922–1929 (Pe B)

Diplomat. Japan specialist. Author

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MINCHIN, Paul 1971–1978 (Pe A)

Managing director with Saint-Gobain Pipelines

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MINERS, Norman 1942–1950 (La B)

Authority on Hong Kong politics

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MISKIN, Kate 2001–2006 (Matron of Gr W)

Her death in January 2006

Comment on CH Forum

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MITCHELL, Dean 1995–2002 (Pe B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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Mitchell, Edna Winifred 1935–1942 (Hertford)

Charlotte Mitchell, who has died aged 85 of pneumonia after suffering from breast cancer and myeloma, was best known to television viewers as Amy Winthrop, the housekeeper in The Adventures of Black Beauty (1972-74), the popular Sunday teatime series.

Mitchell's other interest was poetry. Her first published collection appeared in 1970 and other collections followed, she read her poems on BBC Radio 4. Listeners to the programme Poetry Please frequently requested her work and liked her comments on the foibles of life and disdain for bureaucracy.

She was born Edna Mitchell in Ipswich, Suffolk, the daughter of an engineer and a district nurse. When she was two, her father died of septicaemia after an appendix operation. Mitchell, her mother and elder sister moved around the country and she attended Christ's Hospital Hertford. On leaving at 16, she trained as a dancer at the Arts Educational School in London. After injuring her knee two years later, she decided to become an actor and worked in repertory theatres across the country, changing her name to Charlotte at the suggestion of a director. She also wrote sketches that she performed in revues.

Mitchell made her first film appearances in the role of a schoolgirl in The Romantic Age (1949) and appeared in almost 20 more pictures.

She was often heard on radio whenever a female actor was required in the Goon Show (1951-60). For several years, Mitchell was in the cast of the radio serial Waggoners' Walk as Kath Miller.

From the 1960s, most of her screen roles were on television. She will be remembered by many alongside Wendy Craig, first as her friend Mary in Not in Front of the Children (1967-70), then as her neighbour Monica Spicer in the final two series of And Mother Makes Five (1975-76). Mitchell also played the mother of Paula Wilcox's single mum in the first series (1977) of Miss Jones and Son, and Margaret, wife of Arnold Swain in Coronation Street (1982). Her last regular role was as PC Phil Bellamy's grandmother in Heartbeat (1997-99).

As a writer for television, Mitchell created the children's series The Kids from 47A (1973) and her plays included Summer and Winter (1965) and Buns for the Elephant (1976).

Exerpt from the Guardian June 12

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MITCHELL, Jane 1999–2001 (Col A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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MITCHELL, Rhona 1999–2002 (Archivist & Museum Officer)

Rhona Mitchell (Archivist & Museum Officer 99-02) appears in Tomalin's acknowledgments, and among the book's sources are three histories of CH as well as Maritime Supremacy and the Opening of the Western Mind by Peter Padfield (TA 41-48/9) and Cambridge Under Queen Anne edited by the eccentric scholar J E B Mayor (CH 1830s).

Her history of the firm of Josiah Parkes & Sons:

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MITCHELL-LUKER, Vicci 1980–1984 (5's)

Music teacher

Photo, 2005 - left of picture

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MOBBS, John 1938–1945 (Ma A)

Died on 14 November 2003.

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MOKUOLU, Yemisi 1989–1996 (Ba B)

Owner, Hatch Event Management

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MOLLER, Chris 1963–1970 (Pe A)

Telecoms consultant & project manager

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MONTGOMERY, Paulo 1995–2002 (Ma A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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MOODY, Christopher 1962–1969 (Mid B)

Priest

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MOON, Sarah 1994–2001 (Ba A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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MOORE, Madeleine 1994–2001 (Ba B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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MOORE, Sir Jonas 1600–1699 (Governor 17th century)

Mathematician, cartographer, Inspector-General of the Ordnance

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MOORE, Trevor 1968–1974 (Mid B)

Lawyer. Partner, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer

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MORGAN, Dominic 2000–2002 (Ma B, Gr E)

Student, Cambridge University

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MORGAN, Rev Geoff 1970–1976 (La B)

The Rev Geoff Morgan (La B 70-76) is co-author with Graham Kings of Offerings from Kenya to Anglicanism: liturgical Texts and Contexts including 'A Kenyan Service of Holy Communion' (Grove, £4.95). 'As a European searching for Christian origins in an African context,' he writes, 'this present researcher has felt closer to the divine source of the gospel'.

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MORGANS, J F Croil 1934–1943 (Ba A)

Marine biologist

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MORLAND, Sir Henry (CH circa 1849)

Captain, Royal Indian Marine.

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MORRIS, Augustine 1915–1923 (Ba A)

Abbot of Nashdom Abbey

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MORTLOCK, Joseph Harold 1914–1919 (Ma B)

Banker

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MOSLEY, Rebecca 1994–2001 (LH A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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Moss, Peter 1949–1958 (Prep A / Barnes A)

DIED JUNE 2011. OBITUARY CONTRIBUTED BY DAVID HUMPHREYS (BaA 53-60)

Peter (P.E.G.) Moss was an enthusiast about everything. At CH, he was a ‘founding member’ of the Colonel Pussfoot-Smythe Shrove Tuesday Pancake race, which continued for several years. After science A-levels, and the School rugby 2nd XV, Peter studied Chemistry at London University.

Peter was born in the Seychelles but, whilst at CH, lived with his mother in Ipswich.

We would meet after Old Blues rugby. Peter played in a higher team than me. After London University OTC, Peter was commissioned into the Royal Engineers, and posted to the Junior Leaders’ Regiment at Troon, in Ayrshire. Whilst there, Peter met Jean, elder daughter of a doctor in Ayr , whilst ski-ing at Aviemore. I was invited to their wedding in September 1964, as an usher, but the best man and his dress suit became separated so, having ‘stood-in’ for him at the rehearsal, I did so again in the ceremony proper. The ‘real’ best man officiated at the reception.

Peter served in Tidworth, then changed the Army for the chemical industry in Brighouse, West Yorkshire, followed by a fire-resistant clothing manufacturer in Cornwall. My wife, Anne, and I visited them in Illogan Churchtown, Redruth. Son Ron and daughter Margaret were there, to be followed by Ken and Christine. Later, Peter taught, firstly at Millfield School in Somerset, and later at St.Aubyn’s Prep. School, in Tiverton, a feeder school for Blundells. Our Christmas messages started referring to work with young people’s football teams, and other church activities, including a paper recycling project, long before everyone else recycled paper. An enthusiast again!

Peter became a donation governor. We visited in August 2008. Peter had retired from some activities, and was not in good health, but still an enthusiast. I was shocked to hear that he had died, but had remained an enthusiast! We send our condolences to Jean, their four children, and their families.

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MOTT, Mervyn 1926–1932 (Ba B)

We learn from Dr Andrew Mott (LHB/LB/LA/MdB 87-94) of the death of his great uncle Mervyn G Mott (BB 26-32) on 25 March 2005 after a long illness. He was the last of three brothers who overlapped each other in Prep B and Barnes B. His younger brothers P E Mott (BB 28-35) and A J Mott (BB 26-33) (Andrew's grandfather) died in 2001 and 2002 respectively.

Mervyn joined HM Customs after leaving school. He served in the Royal Navy during WW2 - he was in destroyers in the English Channel and took part in the Dieppe raid in 1942. Afterwards he returned to HM Customs, serving for eight years at Newry on the Ulster/Eire border.

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MOTT, P.E. 1928–1935 (Ba B)

Died on 5 September 2001.

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MOTT, Tony 1926–1933 (Ba B)

Wartime pilot. Later tax specialist

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MOWLL, Garforth S 1922–1929 (Th B)

From Mr Ken Keebler: 'Mr Webb, it is my sad duty to inform you and the 'Old Blues' that my father-in-law, Garforth S. Mowll, Captain (RN, Ret), at age 92, passed away on September 17, 2005 at the Brandon Regional Hospital, Brandon, Florida.

His passing came after several years of poor health. His wife, Shirley, age 87,continues to reside with my wife, Carolyn, and I at 1901 Capri Road; Valrico, FL (USA) 33594.

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MOYES, Imogen 1995–2002 (Col A, Hertford, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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MOYNIHAN, Lord 1875–1881 (16's)

Surgeon

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MUIR, Alec 1919–1928 (La B)

Chief Constable of Durham

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MULLINGER, Joss 1960–1969 (Col A)

Banker & Photographer Joss Mullinger (Col A 60-69) has attended Fairport Convention's annual Cropredy Festival for the past decade, and the result is linked below - Festival Folk (This Way Books, £15), described as 'a crazy car crash of images illustrating a glorious British audience dressed up to the nines for a weekend in a field'. A broad selection of the colourful performers are also depicted. Fairport Convention's founder Simon Nicol provides a foreword, and fashion writer Catherine Hayward gives an insight into festival folk style. Proceeds from the sale of the book go to the Teenage Cancer Trust.

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MULLINGER, Louis 1958–1967 (Col A)

Investment representative in USA

Email him privately here

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MULLINS, Keith 1968–1975 (Th A)

Investment manager

An HTML version should be here

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MUMFORD, Alfred Alexander (CH 1870s)

Paediatrician

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MUNDILL, Robin 1987–1997 (Staff)

Historian. Teacher at Glenalmond

Response

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MURPHY, James 1994–2001 (Th B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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MURRAY, Glenn 1995–2002 (Pe A, Gr W, left 2002)

Details on Big Grecian website

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MURRY, John Middleton 1901–1908 (3's, Ma A)

Recent books by John Purkis (MdB c. 1950): A Preface to Wilfred Owen (Longman, £14.99) - in which the names of Edmund Blunden (Col A 09-15, Senior Grecian), Keith Douglas (La A, Mid B 31-38) and John Middleton Murry (3's, Ma A 01-08) crop up - and Teach Yourself Greek Civilization (Hodder & Stoughton, £8.99).

'Excellent' was the reviewer's verdict in Notes and Queries (June 2000) on A Critical Difference: T S Eliot and John Middleton Murry [3's, Ma A 1901-08] in English Literary Criticism, 1919-1928 by David Goldie (Oxford: Clarendon Press, £35). Eliot, as editor of The Criterion, allegedly conducted a literary 'assassination' of Murry, who had been his editor on The Athenaeum.

Author and editor

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MUSK, Jon 1994–2001 (Ma B, Mid A, Gr E)

Designer

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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MYERS, Miles 1952–1954 (Horsham Staff)

Died aged 72. He served in the RAF as a navigator in Coastal Command and studied geography at Queens' College, Cambridge. After CH he taught at Michaelhouse School in Natal until 1955 when he became articled to a firm of attorneys in Pretoria to train for a career in law. On qualifying he joined the legal section of the Government of Bechuanaland, now Botswana, and subsequently served in Mafeking, Gaberone, where he was Registrar of Deeds and Assistant Attorney General, and eventually Bulawayo, Southern Rhodesia. A few years after Rhodesia became Zimbabwe, he joined the legal firm of Weber Wertzel in Johannesburg of which he later became a partner. He retired in 1994 though he remained a consultant to the firm until shortly before his death. A keen and competent sportsman, he had a passionate interest in cricket and his detailed knowledge of the history and records of the game was outstanding. He was also an expert philatelist with an interest in cartography and genealogy. His obituary in the Queens' College Record called him 'a wonderful companion, slow to condemn others and swift to praise.' His health deteriorated following the early death of his beloved elder daughter and a painful and long-lasting back injury sustained through a motor accident.

Lawyer in Africa

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NABENA, Flora 1995–2002 (LH B, Ba A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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NAPIER, St John 1970–1977 (La B)

Solicitor

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NASH, Frank 1935–1940 (La A)

Paediatrician

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NAYLOR, Ken 1980–1986 (Horsham Staff)

Composer

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NAYLOR, Phil 1971–1977 (Col A, Governor)

Chartered accountant

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NAZER, John Henry 1923–1931 (Pe B)

Farmer & rancher in Africa

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NEAL, Ben 1988–1995 (La A)

Information

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NEEDHAM, Richard J 1923–1930 (Col A)

Columnist, Toronto Globe & Mail

His site

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NEILD, Megan 1995–2002 (Col A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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NEILD, Sam 1994–2001 (Pe B, Pe A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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NELSON-GRACIE, Rodd 1952–1958 (Pe B)

Accountant. School bursar. Councillor, Maidstone

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NEUSS, Paula 1954–1960 (2's)

Scholar of English literature

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NEWBOULD, John 1945–1952 (Th B)

Botanist in Africa

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NEWPORT, Paul (CH circa 1976-83)

His photo in 2003:

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NEWSOME, David 1970–1979 (Headmaster)

One entry in Holy Dread: Diaries 1982-84 by James Lees-Milne (John Murray, £22.50) has the author and National Trust pioneer visiting the Master of Wellington College, Dr David Newsome (Headmaster 70-79), in connection with their biographical projects. 'Such a nice man. We were at once on Christian name terms. Even so, I find it shy-making to be with a headmaster, though he must be twenty years my junior.'

Historian & biographer

Book, The Victorian World Picture

Book, The Parting of Friends - scroll down

Two Classes of Men

His article "Victorian ways of faith"

Headmaster Dr. David Newsome surveys Lunch Parade in Summer 1979

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NEWTON, Sir Isaac 1700–1700 (Governor circa 1700)

The RMS remained his particular concern: 'he was eager to see good results, often asking how the boys fared when they went to sea and sending directives to the staff.' Finding the boys' progress unsatisfactory in 1695 he consulted Sir Isaac Newton (Governor) about a new Master for the RMS; within a few months the man chosen, Sam Newton (no relation), was complaining that boys were being hauled off to sea too young, before doing any serious study, by the then Master of Trinity House, Sir Matthew Andrews (also a Governor). Tomalin quotes from Newton's indignant letter to Pepys, and from Pepys's disappointing, make-the-best-of-it reply; 'had he been younger and more fit, you feel, he would have taken up Newton's cause.'

Scientist & mathematician

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NEWTON-JOHN, Irene (Wife of Brinley Newton-John Horsham Staff circa 1937 and mother of Olivia)

Staff

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NGUYEN, Sang 1995–2002 (La B, Mid B, LB, Gr E)

Student, Cambridge University

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NICHOLL, Joseph 1904–1909 (Th A)

Doctor

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NICHOLS, Sir Richard 1947–1955 (Pe B, Almoner)

Solicitor. Former Lord Mayor of London. Chancellor, University of Ulster

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NICHOLSON, William (Unknown details)

Lithograph

William Nicholson's 1898 lithograph "London Types: Bluecoat Boy"

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NIGHTINGALE, Laura 1999–2001 (LH B, Gr E)

Student, St Andrews University

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NOL-PATON, Duncan 1972–1999 (Horsham Staff)

Stage director

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Noel-Paton, Kate 1985–1989 (Col A)

Alexander Gelman's best-selling Subtraction: Aspects of Essential Design (RotoVision, price unknown) has three editors, one of whom is Kate Noel-Paton, presumably the eponymous Old Blue (CA 85-89).

Publisher's editor

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NORGROVE, David 1957–1967 (Th B 1957-67, Senior Grecian)

Chair, UK Pensions Regulator

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NORRIS, CRM 1942–1950 (La B)

Died 2001.

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NORRIS, Hilary 1979–1985 (1's, 4's)

Solicitor

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NORTHCOTT, Douglas 1927–1935 (Robertson, Col B, Th B, Almoner)

Mathematician

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NORTHWAY, Ariel (CH circa 1980)

Chief Technology Officer, Crystalynx

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NORTON, Robert George 1939–1946 (CH)

Died on 8 March. His family, long established in Portugal, had been financially ruined when fire destroyed the uninsured timber on their country estate. His mother Mary was the author of The Borrowers, later filmed by Peter Hewitt (LA 73-?80).

He started his career in London publishing (Hart-Davis, then MacGibbon & Kee), moved to the US and packed books at the UN before joining the Cambridge University Press in New York. Returning to the UK via Jamaica with his Boston bride Gail Scully, he worked initially as a salesman for a hot metal typesetting firm. Quickly spotting the possibilities of film-based typesetting, he built up Photoscript, the biggest photo-composing house in Europe, which was eventually bought up by the Stephenson Blake type foundry. He next moved into the emerging digital typesetting technology, exploring the systems that now underpin the media world, and began designing typefaces himself. Recognising that the new technologies could release service businesses such as his from the need for a metropolitan base, he bought a hundred ton Baltic ketch and planned to sail the Mediterranean while supplying high class copy-setting for the advertising industry by radio. This was typical: he had done some intrepid Atlantic sailing, trained in motor racing and obtained a US pilot's licence, despite having only one good eye.

His ventures at this time had limited commercial success and ultimately he joined Microsoft in Seattle as their type font development expert. Already more than twice the average age of his colleagues, he stayed until nearly three times older. (When younger workmates took up paragliding he joined them in their practice jumps from table tops, duly breaking his ankle. At six foot eight he was not only older but considerably larger than they were.) Microsoft valued him and he contributed much to them, especially in screen fonts and sensible customer advice based on design expertise.

At nearly seventy he returned to England, worked on the development of new keyboard systems and set up the Parsimony Press, producing a dozen books of his favourite poems, backgammon moves, Saki short stories, etc., all well designed and impossibly low priced. When he died he was the current President of the Double Crown Club, Past President of the Wynkyn de Worde Society and a prominent member of the Association Typographique Internationale.

He is survived by his wife, three daughters and a son.

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O'REILLY, Liam 1994–2001 (Th B, ThA, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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OFFLEY, Sir Thomas 1559–1963 (President)

Lord Mayor of London

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OGUDIPE, Tola 1997–2002 (Col B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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OSBORN, Gavin 1994–2001 (Ma B, Mid A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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OSBORNE, Laurian 1995–2002 (Col A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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OSBORNE, Sue 1964–1970 (4's)

Where are they now FOUND: Being sought by Sarah Theobald (nee Hayward) who was at CH from 1964-1970. She sent her a Christmas card via her sister but neglected to include her address or married name!

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OSBOURNE-BURKE, Jhanelle 1994–2001 (Ba B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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OSCAR, A 1929–1935 (Peter Sheldon-Williams, Ba B)

Artist - used the name "A Oscar"

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OWEN, David 1942–1948 (Th A)

The well-received anthology Listening to the Birth of Crystals (Boho Press, £8.50, sold in aid of the National Deaf Children's Society and the Merseyside Society for Deaf People) contains a poem by David Owen (Th A 42-48). David has had many poems published in small press outlets and newspapers. He lives in Canada and until his knees gave out a few years ago he could be found hiking or biking in the Rocky Mountains. Now he contents himself with coaching the local high school football team and writing poetry.

David Owen (Th A 42-48) sends this extract from a book about James Knight's doomed 1719 expedition into Hudson Bay. In a 1989 excavation of the expedition house a small shoe was found, 'strong evidence that a boy was taken on the expedition. Boy apprentices as young as twelve, usually wards of Christ's Hospital, London, referred to as 'bluecoat boys', were indentured into the Hudson's Bay Company service for tours of duty in the northern wilderness lasting as long as seven years.'

Poet & American football coach

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OWEN, Douglas 1920–1926 (La A)

Priest

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OWEN, John 1924–1932 (Th A, Senior Grecian)

Director of National Parks, Tanzania

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OWEN, William 1994–2001 (Ma B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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OYE, Seun 1995–2002 (La B, Pe A, Pe B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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PADFIELD, Peter 1941–1949 (Th A)

Rhona Mitchell (Archivist & Museum Officer 99-02) appears in Tomalin's acknowledgments, and among the book's sources are three histories of CH as well as Maritime Supremacy and the Opening of the Western Mind by Peter Padfield (Th A 41-48/9) and Cambridge Under Queen Anne edited by the eccentric scholar J E B Mayor (CH 1830s).

Peter Padfield (Th A 41-49) has produced Battleship (Birlinn, £9.99), a completely revised version of his 1972 volume The Battleship Era.

Naval historian & biographer

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PAGE, John Henry (Jack) 1947–1979 (Horsham Staff)

and his wife Carol, daughter of D S Macnutt (Horsham Staff 1928-63)

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PALMER, Delphine 1958–1964 (1's, 8's)

Now Delphine Beecham, owner, Delphine Art

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PALMER, Richard 1974–1981 (Horsham Staff)

Co-editor of Larkin's Jazz: Essays and Reviews 1940-84 (Continuum, £13.99) is Richard Palmer (Horsham Staff 74-81).

Teacher & author

Book, Brain Train

His edition of Philip Larkin's uncollected jazz writings

Oscar Peterson's autobiography, which he edited

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PANAITE, Sergiu 1996–2002 (La B, Ma A, Ma B, Gr E)

Information

His photo gallery

Details on Big Grecian website

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PANNELL, Elizabeth 1995–2002 (LH B, Hertford, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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PANNELL, Reagan 1989–1996 (Mid A)

Photographer

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PARFITT, Annabelle 1963–1969 (3's, 5's)

Now Annabelle Mark, Professor of Healthcare Organisation

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PARKER, Roger 1946–1954 (La B)

Surgeon & clinical anatomist

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PARKES, Edmund 1829–1834 (CH)

Medical reformer

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PARKS-SMITH, David, M.A. D.Phil (Oxon) 1949–1958 (Prep A?, Prep B?, Mid B)

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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PARRANS-SMITH, Nick (Head of Brass & Music Technology 2000-03)

Previous link to Heaven Entertainment Ltd - this ceased trading as of 28/2/2006.

Link to Heaven Entertainment

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PARSONS, Patrick 1922–1928 (Ma A)

Film and stage actor - "Patrick Holt"

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PARSONS, Timothy R 1942–1949 (Ba B)

The memoirs of the oceanographer Timothy Parsons (Ba B 42-49) will be published next spring by EcceNova Editions, entitled The Sea's Enthrall. 'A witty, at times philosophical, sometimes even poignant exposition on Life, as seen from the perspective of a man whose scientific training is wonderfully complemented by a curiosity for less empirical matters, such as poetry and religion,' the book includes a section on his CH years, complete with photos. A CH contemporary, Brigadier General Ron Bell (Ba B 43-51), commends Parsons as 'an independent thinker who likes to challenge conventional views, whatever the subject - a scientist who appears to have discovered there is a poetry to life which illuminates his thinking.'

Paul J Harrison and Timothy R Parsons (Ba B 42-49), Professors in the University of British Columbia's Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, have co-edited Fisheries Oceanography: An Integrative Approach to Fisheries Ecology and Management (Blackwell Science, £35).

Oceanographer

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PASKUNAS, Vytautas 1994–1996 (Mid A)

Mathematician, Bielefeld University, Germany

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PASSMORE, Tom 1995–2002 (Th B, ThA, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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PATEMAN, John A 1924–1931 (Mid B)

Died in early 2005 after a short illness, aged 92. From CH he went to Jesus College, Cambridge, where he gained a First in Classics and played rugby and cricket for the college. His career as a teacher began at Loretto School, Edinburgh. During the War he served with the Royal Scots in the Shetland Isles and West Africa before joining Western Command HQ at Chester in the Department of Chemical Warfare.

After a brief return to Loretto he was appointed headmaster of Hilton College, Natal, South Africa. In 1953 he received the Queen's Coronation Medal for services to education there. Retiring from teaching soon afterwards he entered the recruitment world but remained an active supporter of the Maru A Pula school, Botswana.

When he finally retired he became secretary of the Highgate Literary and Scientific Institution and later a trustee, raising considerable sums for its 160th anniversary appeal. His wife Jean, whom he married in 1946, founded and chaired the Friends of Highgate Cemetery, and together they raised millions to ensure the future of the UK's most famous cemetery.

At his memorial service there he was remembered as a spiritual man, profoundly unselfish and self-effacing, known for his unfailing courtesy, puckish humour, lively gift for observation and constant awareness of public duty. His wife and their three children and six grandchildren survive him.

Headmaster & recruiter

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PATTISON, Frank 1987–2005 (Staff)

Staff

A discussion arising from this photograph

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PEARCE, Ernest H 1874–1884 (CH, Staff 1891-92, Governor & Almoner)

Bishop of Worcester

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PEARCE, Tom 1917–1922 (Ma A, Governor)

Cricketer

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PEAREY, Michael 1942–1951 (Ba B, Clerk 1986-98)

Praise for the late Capt Michael Pearey (Ba B 42-51, Clerk 86-98) in Will Carling: My Autobiography (with Paul Ackford, Coronet, £7.99). The former England rugby captain writes: 'Mike was unlike other senior RFU figures. He saw things from the players' point of view, as well as protecting the interests of his committee. I could do business with Mike and if there were more like him on the RFU committee when the sport was deciding its future it might not have got itself into the mess it did.'

Captain, Royal Navy. President, Rugby Football Union

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PEARSON, W B (Bill) 1931–1940 (Th A, Col A,, Senior Grecian)

Metallurgist

An HTML version is here

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PEDLEY, Sarah (2's)

Where are they now: Joined 2's in 1976, being traced by Charlotte Thornton, Sheba Gan, Selina Woolcott, Tanya Heasman and Caron Haskell

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PEEK, Zoe 1993–2001 (Ba A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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PELANCONI, Justin 1994–2001 (Pe B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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PEMBERTON, Professor John. MD, FRCP, MCFM, DPH 1922–1930 (Pe B)

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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PENNY, John 1969–1984 (Head of Art)

John Penny, Head of Art at Christ’s Hospital from 1969 to 1984, died peacefully in his sleep aged 79 on 1st of January 2008.

John Penny was a popular teacher as the many kind reflections from former pupils bears out. His manner and way with his pupils endeared him to many as did his infectious love of Art. He was the first to open the Art School on Sundays, allowing all pupils to come in and be creative, unrestricted by the curriculum.

John, apart from his duties as a teacher, was a keen amateur actor, taking part in many school plays as well as musical performances, helped by his schooldays as a chorister at Winchester Choir School. He was also, for a period, chairman of the Debating Society.

John grew up in Portsmouth and, after completing his education at Art College in Portsmouth, John fulfilled his National Service obligations, serving as a lieutenant (the first officer in the family) with the 1st Battalion Manchester Regiment during the Malayan Emergency 1951-1954.

After National Service, John began his teaching career in Chesham, Sherbourne, Ramsgate and Scarborough, before taking the post at Christ’s Hospital. There the family lived and both his sons were pupils at the school.

After retiring from full time teaching, John moved to Portsmouth and then finally to Fishbourne, giving Art History lectures at the Chichester Art Club and putting on several exhibitions of his work. John was a wonderful father and grandfather, worrying his own children with his energetic and enthusiastic larking around with one or all of his 5 grandchildren. He sometimes found the 21st century not to his taste. He often described himself as a ‘dinosaur’ while confessing to being more suited to the Edwardian period than today’s world.

He is survived by his three children. Sarah, a teacher living in London, Will a teacher living in Denmark and James, who works in the telecommunications industry and still lives in Horsham. All love and miss their Dad and his slightly idiosyncratic ways.

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PERCIVAL, Arthur Blayney (Wd 8 circa 1870)

Naturalist & game warden in Kenya

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PERRY, John 1961–1969 (La A)

Accountant

Click on this and click on "personal"

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PERRY, Kenneth (CH 1920s)

Physician

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PETERS, Helen 1994–2001 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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PETO, James 1971–1976 (La A)

James Peto (La A 71-76) is co-editor of Isambard Kingdom Brunel: Recent Works (Design Museum, ?24.95) which explores six of Brunel's engineering projects in depth with essays by historians and practising engineers and architects.

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PETTER, Jon 1975–1982 (Col A)

Musician

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PETTER, Tim 1971–1976 (La B)

Obituary

Tim Petter, who died on 13th March 2006 aged 46 after a dignified and courageous battle against malignant melonoma, will be remembered by all who knew him as a man of extraordinary diversity and intellect.

Although he had a fairly conventional start in life with his secondary education at Christ's Hospital, Horsham followed by Jesus College Cambridge, his life was anything but ordinary.

From a very early age he developed a passion for music and the trombone (amongst a wealth of other instruments) became a lifelong part of everyday life right up until a couple of months before he died, and he played in countless bands from the marching band at Christ's Hospital, Reggae and jazz bands, Klezmer ensembles, Kathy Stobart's big band, and in the early 1980's the stalwarts of any CND or anti-nuclear rally, The Fallout Marching Band, to name a few.

He was very tall, with an eccentric dress sense, a fondness for collecting strange objects and in the early 1980's became a circus performer with a natural sense of the ridiculous working with his partner all over this country and then in Japan. While working in Japan he became fascinated by the culture and language and learnt to speak (and write) Japanese. On returning to Britain he enrolled in a course in Japanese at SOAS where his fluency and dedication earned him top marks.

However his love of performing and music drew him away from a career in languages and in 1996 he formed a large scale performance company The Dream Engine whose spectacular inventions have wowed audiences all over the world. In particular The Heliosphere, an enormous Helium balloon with an aerialist pirouetting suspended underneath it is one of the most beautiful images you could ever hope to see.

Alongside this he was a tireless supporter and committed member of a South London Housing Co-operative, and worked endlessly to create affordable housing in South London, a legacy that is enjoyed by over 50 members and their families to this day. He was passionate about Aikido and an accomplished 3rd dan black belt.

Sadly, he was not to live long into old age. A mole that was removed from his back in 2003 was found to be malignant and subsequently the disease spread throughout his body. He faced his death with enormous fortitude and strength. He died at home as he had wanted with Theresa by side and a house full of children, his 2 brothers and friends. His coffin was made from driftwood and he was driven in the back of his volvo to be cremated at a service conducted by his family. A celebration followed two days later in the cherry orchard where his youngest brother lives. 250 people came. We spoke, we drank, we sang, cried and laughed. A rainbow came out. It was a fitting end for a wonderful man who crammed more into his short life than many of us could ever hope to.

He leaves behind his partner of 22 years ( and wife of 8 weeks) Theresa, and his three children Tashi, Lucas and Molly.

Tim Petter 11.6.1959 - 13.3.2006

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PEWTRESS, Alfred 1904–1907 (La B)

Cricketer

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PHILLIPS, Frank 1912–1917 (Mid B)

In his 1973 autobiography In and Out of the Box, the veteran newsreader Robert Dougall recalled that in 1951 he, Alan Skempton (TA 32-39) and Frank Phillips (MdB 12-17) were among the 'Big Seven' chosen to provide news coverage on all three BBC radio networks. Later he made the transition to television alongside Phillips, who said it was 'like driving a Rolls Royce after a Mini.' He also mentioned a sticky moment for the actor Geoffrey Wincott (MdB 11-18), who as a relief announcer on the BBC Empire Service in the Thirties was especially good at bidding listeners goodnight; but on one occasion, having properly intoned 'Good night to you all - wherever you may be - good night from London,' he went on (annoyed with the engineers, and unaware that his mike was still 'live') 'The bloody fools! Christ! The bloody fools!'

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PICKFORD, Briony 1989–1996 (Ba A)

Briony is living in London and completing a course in interior design and writing poems and stories for children whilst nannying.

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PICKFORD, Helen 1980–1986 (2s, Ba B)

After several years teacher training in Malaysia Helen has recently travelled to the Congo where she is working training teacher-trainers to set up new schools in areas devastated by war. She is working for Children in Crisis.

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PICKFORD, Susan 1986–1993 (Ba A)

UPDATE JULY 07 has just been awarded a permanent lectureship in translation at the University of Paris.

Susan Pickford (Ba A 85-92) is presently at the University of Toulouse, working on typographical innovations in early Romantic travel writing, and has translated a number of books, chiefly on art. Her translation of Jacques Derrida's article 'Ceci n'est pas une note infrapaginale' will be included in L'espace de la note, a forthcoming book from the Presses Universitaires de Poitiers which will also contain her own article on the use of endnotes in modern editions of Sterne's Sentimental Journey.

Translator & scholar

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PIM, Henry 1956–1965 (Col A)

Where are they now: Several web link references, but no obvious email address. Being sought by Rod Stuart, Th A 1956-1965

Potter

Pottery picture

Analysis of ceramic work from Art Gallery Western Australia

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PINDAR, Sorrel 1969–1976 (8's)

Osteopath

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PINHEY, Hamnett Kirkes 1792–1799 (CH, Governor)

Pioneer in Upper Eastern Canada

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PINK, G W 'Pinker' (Horsham Staff 1930s-1940s)

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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PINNIGER, Miles 1959–1968 (Ba B, Col B)

Lighting design consultant

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PIPER, Fred 1951–1958 (Th B, Mid B)

Mathematician

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PIPPET, Alison 1967–1972 (7's)

Teacher in Shanghai

Photo

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PITCHER, Henry William 1848–1856 (CH)

Indian Army officer. First Old Blue to win Victoria Cross

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PITCHER, Neil 1995–2002 (La B, Gr?)

Serving in the US Army

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PLUMLEY, Nick 1967–2001 (Horsham Staff/Curator)

The firm of Goetze and Gwynn builds new organs in the classical British tradition and restores historic organs for churches, the National Trust and national museums. The 'Gwynn' half is Dominic Gwynn (Pe A 64-71) who has now written Historic Organ Conservation: A practical introduction to processes and planning (Church House Publishing, £9.95). An appendix recommends The Organs of the City of London (1996) by Nick Plumley (Horsham Staff/Curator 67-01).

Painter, author, antiquarian

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PODMANICZKY, Gabor 2000–2001 (La A, Gr E)

Warwick University graduate

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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PODOLINSKIS, Dainius 1999–2001 (Mid A, Gr E)

Student, London School of Economics

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POGSON, Katherine 1976–1981 (8's)

Leather designer

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POPE, Edward 1994–2001 (Th B, Mid B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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PORTER, Andrew 1957–1964 (Th A)

Historian

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PORTER, Derrick 1945–1950 (Ma A)

Chemist

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POSTLETHWAITE, Sarah Jane Kate 1994–2001 (Ba A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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POTTER, Robert 1994–2001 (Ma B, Pe A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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POTTER, Will 1976–1983 (La A)

Building services consultant

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POTTS, Chris 1971–1977 (Mid A)

Managing Director, Dominic Barrow

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PRACY, Henry Edward 1906–1913 (CH)

Chemist

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PRENTIS, William 1708–1714 (CH)

Merchant in Virginia

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PRICE, Kenton 1981–1988 (Horsham)

IT consultant

CH Forum comment

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PRIESTLEY, Tom 1946–1955 (Mid B)

Slovene scholar

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PRINCE, Moyna 1948–1955 (Campbell, 3's)

Cultivator of bromeliads

Her article "True full-sun bromeliads"

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Prince and the Pauper, notes on CH by Mark Twain

Mark Twain's notes on CH in The Prince and the Pauper (1882)

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PRINGLE, Sloane 1977–1983 (Pe B)

Photographer

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PRITCHARD, David 1939–1945 (Pe A)

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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PRITCHARD, Steve 1976–1983 (La A)

Employed by BT Laboratories

His musical CV

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PROCTER, Michael 1960–1969 (La A)

Authority on Renaissance music

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Proctor, Michael 1960–1969 (Mid B)

Michael Procter died suddenly at his home in Karlsruhe on 3 May 2012, aged 61. CH, with its long and distinguished musical history, provided an admirable environment for the nurture of his talents, which he displayed during his professional life as singer, organiser of courses embracing a range of music from mediaeval chant to jazz and from Western Europe to India, scholar and conductor.

He directed many week-end courses devoted to liturgical music for the Thames Valley and the Eastern Early Music Fora, particularly in Cambridge. His technique as musical director was deeply informed by his devotion to Christianity and to church ritual, and his aim was always to ensure that the singers conveyed the meaning of the text to their audience. I first met him during the 1990s at a weekend course held in a monastic establishment near Ross-on-Wye, and was immediately struck by his distinctive approach to directing a scratch group of moderately experienced amateurs assembled with 36 hours to prepare for singing a Mass. He was meticulous without being overbearing, scholarly without being pedantic, serious in his work but hugely entertaining in between rehearsals.

Prominent among his non-musical interests was the life of Sherlock Holmes. He had recently produced a short book entitled Melancholia in Music, in which he applied his varied talents to reconstructing the monograph on the Polyphonic Motets of Lassus on which Holmes was engaged when his services were required in “The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans”. I had the pleasure of reviewing the book earlier this year, and we were looking forward greatly to meeting at St Augustine’s, Kilburn for another in the series of polychoral masses which he directed annually there, and to discussing his ingenious and erudite reconstruction.

Michael was unique; it was always a delight to sing with him, and his many friends in all aspects of his sadly truncated life will miss him greatly.

Contributed by Sidney Ross (BaB 43-50)

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Property overlooking St. James' Park

Sale of a CH property overlooking St James's Park

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PRYLE, Stuart 1970–1976 (Col A)

Teacher, died 1989

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PUGIN, Augustus Welby (Non-foundationer 1820s)

It has sometimes been suggested that CH's claim to have educated the great Gothic artist and designer Augustus Welby Pugin (Non-Foundationer 1820s) is not securely based. We might point to the testimony of Benjamin Ferrey, who knew the schoolboy Pugin personally and wrote of his being a day boy at Newgate Street and 'completing the ordinary course of education at Christ's Hospital' (Recollections of A W N Pugin & His Father Augustus Pugin, 1861, reissued 1978); but all doubt should be removed by Alexandra Wedgwood's A W N Pugin and the Pugin Family (Victoria & Albert Museum, 1985) in which Pugin's own notes on his education are quoted in full. 'Studied mathematics at Christ's Hospital under the Rev R N Adams, but never made much progress. [Wedgwood points out that such comments are contradicted by Ferrey, who noted the young Pugin's quickness and intelligence.] I first studied in the old mathematical school, now destroyed; at that time the school was divided into two and furnished with massive forms and desks of oak with large fireplaces. Mr Adams was a most clever, excellent, good man and paid every attention to me, but the sort of study was not to my liking. On his leaving I studied under the Revd J Tyson until his resignation.

'I likewise, for the last year, studied Latin in this school, first under Mr Leighton, the Upper Graecian [sic] and afterwards, under the Rev Edward Rice [who later became Headmaster and committed suicide], but Latin was much too dry a study for me and accordingly my progress was very limited. The Rev Dr [A W] Trollope was headmaster of this school all the time I was there. I remember seeing the public supping in the old hall before it was pulled down, and likewise the speeches there. It was a long plain room whose greatest ornament consisted in two large pictures regarding the charters of the hospital [obviously the Verrio and 'The Presentation of the Charter'].'

Pugin also mentions what we have long known: that he saw the first stone of the new CH hall laid by the Duke of York in 1825. He watched the ceremony from the top of the writing school with the architect's son and did a spirited sketch of it.

Architect and designer

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PULLINGER, Dr David 1963–1969 (Mid B)

In Information Technology and Cyberspace (Darton, Longman & Todd, ?8.95) Dr David Pullinger (MdB 63-69) develops a specifically Christian approach to the subject, exploring questions of community, privacy, relationship, identity and political authority.

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PUNTER, Ian 1955–1962 (Ba A)

Cinematographer

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PUREFOY, William 1979–1986 (Ma A, La A)

Countertenor

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PURKIS, John (Mid B, 1950s)

Recent books by John Purkis (Mid B c. 1950): A Preface to Wilfred Owen (Longman, £14.99) - in which the names of Edmund Blunden (Col A 09-15, Senior Grecian), Keith Douglas (La A, Mid B 31-38) and John Middleton Murry (3's, Ma A 01-08) crop up - and Teach Yourself Greek Civilization (Hodder & Stoughton, £8.99).

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PURKIS, Peter 1941–1949 (Th A)

Recent books by John Purkis (MdB c. 1950): A Preface to Wilfred Owen (Longman, ?14.99) - in which the names of Edmund Blunden (CA 09-15, Senior Grecian), Keith Douglas (LA, MdB 31-38) and John Middleton Murry (3's, MA 01-08) crop up - and Teach Yourself Greek Civilization (Hodder & Stoughton, ?8.99).

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QUAIF, Alan 1933–1938 (Mid B)

Insurance agent & real estate agent

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QUICKENDEN / DICKSON, "Lynn" 1939–1945 (7's)

Where are they now: The family of the late Mrs Pamela Wright nee Dingle, (7's 39-45) are trying to trace her contemporary at CH Hertford, who is known as "Lynn" Quickenden/Dickson.

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QUINE, Andrew 1994–2001 (Pe B, Th A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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RADWAY, Lisa 1994–2001 (LH A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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Railway station article about the old CH station

The old Christ's Hospital station

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RALLS, Abigail 1988–1995 (Col A)

Where are they now FOUND: Being sought by Ben Neal. She was in Col A from 1988 until 1995, and came from Devon. Seemed to disappear off the face of the Earth the day she left!

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RAMOS, Thady 1995–2002 (Th B, Mid B, Pe B, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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RAMOS, Tod 1967–1975 (Pe A)

Equestrian artist

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RAMSAY-SMITH, Rebecca 1999–2001 (LH B, Gr E)

Student, Exeter University

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RAMSEY, Sir Thomas 1582–1590 (President)

Lord Mayor of London

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RANCE, Patrick 1927–1936 (Ba B)

Authority on cheese

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RANDALL, Philippa (CH circa 1960)

Ex-Headmistress, Leeds Girls' Grammar School

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RANKINE, Isabel 1994–2001 (Ba B, Gr W)

Grecians 2001 profile

Her battle with solar urticaria

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RATCLIFF, Kester 1999–2001 (La A, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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RATHBONE, Dominic W 1968–1975 (La A)

The Cambridge Philological Society has published Production and Public Powers in Classical Antiquity (£15) edited by E Lo Cascio and D W Rathbone (La A 68-75). Rathbone is also co-editor of The High Empire, AD 70-192 (CUP, £110), Volume XI of The Cambridge Ancient History, Second Edition.

Ancient historian

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RAVENSCROFT, Thomas 1618–1622 (Music master)

Composer

The music of Thomas Ravenscroft

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RAY-JONES, Tony (Col B circa 1950-59)

The work and legacy of photographer Tony Ray-Jones (Col B c. 50-59) are reassessed in an eponymous book by Russell Roberts (Boot, £29.95) which presents the best of Ray-Jones's pictures and examines his life and artistic development. It ends with a conversation between two people Ray-Jones profoundly influenced, the photographer Martin Parr and the writer and teacher Bill Jay.

Photographer

Guardian article, 2004

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RAYMOND, Isobel 1984–1991 (Ba B)

Co-founder, Twinspot Travel

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RAYSON, Carol 1959–1965 (3's)

Now Carol Stevens, civil servant & CH Almoner

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REDGATE, Chris (Woodwind teacher, Hertford, circa 1980)

Oboist. Lecturer, London Bible College

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REDHOUSE, Sir James 1819–1826 (CH)

Lexicographer of Turkish

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REDPATH, Leopold (Governor)

Keith Mackness (TB 49-55, Governor) draws our attention to Stephen Halliday's Making the Metropolis: Creators of Victoria's London (Breedon Books, ?19.99) which states that Sir Charles Barry, architect of the Houses of Parliament, went to school at CH like his collaborator Pugin. Remarkable if true, but the new Oxford Dictionary of National Biography says merely that Barry attended 'three local schools' (his family lived in Westminster - would Newgate Street have been 'local'?). Alfred Barry's 1867 Memoir of Sir Charles describes all three without naming any: the first was 'a mere preparatory school'; the second was run by a 'very dissolute' master who sometimes absented himself for weeks on end; the third 'attempted only mechanical teaching and severe discipline.' Schools one and two don't sound like CH, but school three may be a candidate, the more so as Barry acquired there 'a remarkably beautiful handwriting' which he could have learnt in our Writing School. His father was prosperous but that wouldn't have stopped Barry attending CH as a private pupil (again like Pugin) or, as Keith suggests, gaining a place there via financial sleight-of-hand. Alternatively his father's death in 1805 may have left a good part of his wealth inaccessible until his children reached their majority, leaving the family in genuine need. Can anyone tell us more? Halliday's book also has much to say about Sir Henry Cole (CH 1817-23), his deep involvement with Prince Albert and others in bringing the 1851 Great Exhibition building to fruition and his directing of its profits to the South Kensington Museums. Cole was the first Director of the V & A and raised money for building the Albert Hall. Mentioned too is a notorious CH Governor, Leopold Redpath, who frustrated a bid to build a London underground railway in the 1850s by embezzling the funds earmarked for it. He was one of the last convicts to be transported to Australia.

Mentioned too is a notorious CH Governor, Leopold Redpath, who thwarted a bid to build a London underground railway in the 1850s by embezzling the funds earmarked for it. He was one of the last convicts to be transported to Australia.

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REDWOOD, Amy 1995–2002 (Ba A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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REEVES, Gordon Roy 1922–1927 (Mid A)

Died in June 1999, was a cutler and silversmith by profession, and proprietor of Ideal Gift Industries. During World War II he served in the Royal Artillery, rising to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel; afterwards he was a Major in the Regular Army Reserve of Officers. He was a member of the OBRFC, served as Chairman of the Stewards of Founder's Day circa 1978 and left the contents of his wine cellar to the CH Common Room. His wife predeceased him.

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REGAN, Richard D (current Almoner)

Almoner

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Regester, Shelagh 1966–1973 (4s)

It is with great sadness that I let you all know that Shelagh died in March this year after courageously battling cancer for the past three years. Incorrigible to the end, Shelagh met each new challenge presented with her acerbic wit and stoic pragmatism. Refusing yet another course of chemo which would prolong her life for only a few months, Shelagh accepted the implications of this with her customary irreverent sense of humour and she went on to plan her funeral in meticulous detail, the culmination of which was a vibrant celebration of her life at her local pub, the Bolly overflowing. I couldn't be there as I now live in NZ but all from all accounts it was a wonderful and joyous memoir of a life lived to the full. My brother Oliver (MaB, ColA 72-78) and Shelagh's great friend Roger Thornton (PrepA, LHA, PeA 63-72) were able to be there and Rogg read eloquently at the service.

I first met Shelagh at the age of ten when we nervously gathered at Hertford as new girls, little realising the impact that CH would have on our lives. Butter wouldn't melt and I thought that it was unlikely that we would be friends but appearances can be deceptive and a year later we were friends for life, sharing adventures at CH that are probably best left unrecorded here. Over the years we grew to know a number of the Housey boys who also became lifelong friends and it is testimony to the common CH values of decency, honesty and authenticity which the years and distance did not diminish in terms of the value of friendship.

Shelagh's talent and ability led to a career in direct marketing that saw her shine in a number of market leading roles in international organisations but she never forgot the importance of friendship - her quiet, unfailing and understated kindess will be remembered by all of us who were privileged to be her friends.

Contributed by Julia Stones (4s 66 -73)

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RHODES, Guy 1980–1986 (Pe A)

Landmine clearance expert

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RHYDWEN, Daryl (2's)

Where are they now: Joined 2's in 1976, being traced by Charlotte Thornton, Sheba Gan, Selina Woolcott, Tanya Heasman and Caron Haskell

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RICE, Edward (CH circa 1810, Staff from before 1820, Headmaster 1836-53)

Priest & headmaster

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RICHARDS, Bill 1961–1970 (Pe B, Governor, Almoner)

Solicitor. Senior Partner, Lawrence Graham

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RICHARDS, Jean 1957–1964 (Pacy, 3's)

Chairman, Datatrac

Interview, 1998

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RICHARDS, Jon 1977–1983 (Pe A)

Engineer & business analyst

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RICHARDSON, Mark 1976–1983 (Pe A)

Design & technology teacher

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RICHARDSON, Stewart 1995–2002 (Ma B, La A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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RIDER, Candy 1999–2001 (LH B, Gr E)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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RIDLEY, Simon 1986–1993 (La B, La A)

Structure & productivity adviser, HM Treasury

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RIGBY, Alan 1936–1943 (Ba B)

Died end of 2003 / beginning 2004.

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RILEY, Jon 1973–1979 (Ma A, Th B)

Life of Riley

Live & Let Dye - the complete dyeing service for silk, satin and leather shoes and accessories.

Horsham Salsa - every Wednesday, Shelley's Bar Horsham.

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RILEY, Laura 1995–2002 (LH A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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RISEBERO, Bill 1949–1957 (Ma A)

Architect, town planner, author

Publications

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RISEBOROUGH, Philip 1962–1970 (Mid A)

Chief Executive, National Examining Board for Supervision & Management

Previous link to sub-section of the website www.tmag.co.uk now broken.

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ROBB, Philip 1975–1982 (Mid B)

Lawyer. Partner at Lovells

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ROBERTS, Clive 1963–1970 (Col A)

Marine biologist

Photo, 2002

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ROBERTS, Dominic 1995–2002 (Pe B, Ma A, Ma B, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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ROBERTS, G L "Bobby" 1914–1918 (Ba A)

Brigadier

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ROBERTS, Herbert Ainslie 1874–1883 (CH, Almoner)

The Great Book of the Amicable Society of Blues, privately printed for the Society at the University Press 01 January, 1929

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ROBERTS, Martin 1950–1960 (Mid A)

Britain 1846-1964: The Challenge of Change (OUP £15) by Martin Roberts (Mid A 50s) forms part of the 'Oxford Advanced History' series and is written specifically for the new AS and A2 examinations.

Headteacher & author

Publications

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ROBERTS, Mervyn 1963–1967 (Music Staff)

The Grove Dictionary of Music says the Welsh composer Mervyn Roberts taught music at CH (Horsham or Hertford?) from 1963-67. Born in 1906, a student of Gordon Jacob, he is most esteemed for his piano works, which include the Sonata (Edwin Evans Prize, 1950) and some substantial pieces for two pianos, three of which are on the recent recording On Heather Hill: Discoveries from the British Isles by Bruce Posner and Donald Garvelmann (Olympia OCD680, £11). Roberts also wrote songs and choral works. All his music, one recent critic has said, displays 'a strong melodic impulse, often of a kind of Bach-like spirituality'. His death in 1990 was not recorded in The Blue.

Composer

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ROBERTS, Nick 1976–1982 (Th A)

Where are they now FOUND: Being sought by Mike Le Butt (1976-1982)

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ROBERTS, Pete 1963–1973 (Col A)

Where are they now: Left Col A in 1974, being traced by James Parson (left Pe A 1975). He joined the Royal Artillery and then went to Middle Wallop, qualifying as a helicopter pilot and may have then gone to fly privately in the Middle East

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ROBERTSON, Douglas 1927–1935 (Col B, TB)

Later Douglas Northcott, mathematician

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ROBINSON, W Peter 1943–1952 (Mid A)

The New Handbook of Language and Social Psychology by W Peter Robinson (Mid A 43-52) and Howard Giles (Wiley, £105) is a fully updated and revised version of Robinson's best-known work, now tackling such questions as 'How social is computer-mediated communication?'

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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RODD, Ernest Harry 1901–1906 (10's, La B)

Chemist

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ROE, John Septimus 1807–1813 (CH)

Surveyor-General, Western Australia

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ROE, Reginald Heber (OB, left 1869)

Educator in Australia

Photo

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ROGERS, James 1970–1977 (La A)

Novelist

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ROLF, Hazel (nee Sirett) 1931–1938 (3's)

Sisters all in time of War A compilation about the ways in which women (including a number of CH Old Girls) have been affected by their experience of war. The majority are British but the book ranges from China to Scandinavia, from New Zealand to North America. Available from the author for £6 + p & p - details will be added when confirmed.

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ROOT, Frank (CH c1919-1925)

Two more posthumous books from the monk and mystic Bede Griffiths (A R Griffiths, PB, BB 19-25). Arthur James and Medio Media have published The Mystery Beyond: On Retreat With Bede Griffiths (£5.99), and John Swindells has edited A Human Search: Bede Griffiths Reflects On His Life: An Oral History (Burns & Oates, £8.50) in which seven pages are devoted to his CH years. On being a Grecian: 'I remember somebody saying that I went about the school as though I owned the place.' Griffiths, Frank Root (CH c. 19-25) and the future Foreign Secretary Michael Stewart (LA 18-25) became pacifists under Tolstoy's influence, refused promotion in the Officer Training Corps and were released from it entirely by William Hamilton Fyfe (Headmaster 19-30), 'a very wonderful person'. Later they were Oxford Socialists together.

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ROPER, Geoffrey 1950–1958 (Mid A)

Free Churches leader

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ROSE, Josiah 1995–2002 (Th B, Th A, Th B, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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ROSE, Martial 1933–1939 (CH)

Martial Rose (CH 33-39) is co-author with Julia Hedgecoe of Stories in Stone: The Medieval Roof Carvings of Norwich Cathedral (Herbert Press, £15.99).

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ROSENBERG, Sidney 1943–1950 (Ba B)

Now Sidney Ross, barrister

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ROSIER, Natalie 1994–2001 (Col B, Gr W)

Graduate, Bristol University

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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ROSS, Sidney 1943–1950 (Rosenberg, Ba B)

Barrister

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ROSS GOOBEY, George 1922–1928 (Pe B, Governor, Almoner)

Pension fund manager

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ROSSOTTI, Francis J.C. MA, BSc, MA, DPhil, CChem, FRSC 1938–1948 (Ba B)

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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ROWCROFT, Victoria (Music Staff)

Musicologist and singer

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ROWE, Beverley Charles 1947–1954 (Ba A)

Computer consultant

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ROWE, Christopher 1954–1962 (Ma B)

The award by the Leverhulme Trust of a Personal Research Professorship enabled Durham University's Professor of Greek, Christopher Rowe (Ma B 54-62), to complete his translation of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (OUP, £15.99). His historical introduction to the book combines with a philosophical one and commentary by Sarah Broadie to make a 'magnificent' edition that in the words of one authority 'will immediately become everyone's first choice. Rowe's translation meets the highest standards for philosophical accuracy - while also conveying the special stylistic excellence of much of Aristotle's text.'

Classicist

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ROWELL, Geoffrey 1978–1990 (Almoner)

Bishop of Gibraltar in Europe

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ROWLAND, Dr Dominic 1979–1986 (La A)

One of the authors of Writing with Style edited by Rebecca Stott and Simon Avery (Longman, £9.99) is Dr Dominic Rowland (La A 79-86).

Civil servant

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ROWLAND, Stephen 2000–2002 (Ma A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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ROWLEY, Ian 1985–1989 (Staff)

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ROXBURGH, Bruce 1976–1982

Where are they now: Being sought by Mike Le Butt (1976-1982)

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ROY, Bernard 1961–1968 (Pe B)

Science teacher, Miami

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RUBBRA, Benedict 1949–1956 (Col A, Horsham Art Staff 1960s)

Belated mention for a book published in 1998 for the sixtieth-birthday retrospective exhibition of painter Benedict Rubbra (CA 49-56, Horsham Art Staff 60s). Benedict Rubbra: Paintings 1958-98: Ideas and Influences (Edizioni Electa, ?9.95) has eighty-nine illustrations, many in colour. Its text amounts to a short autobiography, complete with CH material, notably a loving account of Nell Todd (Horsham Staff 50-69), inspiring and eccentric Head of Art. Rubbra found her impossible to paint: 'Miss Todd only looks herself when she puts on her hundred and one facial expressions and when I tell her to keep still, it looks nothing like her.' At her instigation Rubbra painted the Hon David Herbert (Horsham Staff 55-61) who went into publishing and commissioned two books from Rubbra; Herbert's widow Brenda edited the present one. A later and grander portrait commission involved Sir Colin Davis (TB 38-44). (Rubbra also did a posthumous portrait of George Seaman (TA, BB 20-27, Headmaster 55-70, Governor), never yet reproduced in The Blue.)

Painter

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Rugby Football Club, OBRFC

The Old Blues Rugby Football Club

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Rugby team photos 2000 - 2001 at SchoolsRugby.co.uk

The First XV

The Second XV

The Under 16s

The Under 15s

The Under 14s

The Under 13s

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Rugby team photos 2003 - 2004 at SchoolsRugby.co.uk

The First VII

The Under 12s

The Under 12s B

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RUPERT-JONES, John A (CH 1880s)

Nautical astronomer

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RUSSELL, Miles

Where are they now FOUND: Being sought by Juliana Matthews

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RUSSELL, Tim 1974–1979 (Col B)

Managing Director, Amadeus, Australia & NZ

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RUTHVEN, Professor Douglas M. MA, PhD, ScD, FRSC 1950–1957 (Col A)

Chemical engineer

Mention in Old Blue Scientists Reminisce - extensive report on Science Teaching at CH.

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RYAN, Alan 1951–1959 (La A, Almoner)

Philosopher. Warden, New College, Oxford

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RYAN, Alexander 1994–2001 (Pe B, Th A, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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SACKETT, A B 1921–1928 (Horsham Staff)

Headmaster, Kingswood School

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SAINT, Andrew 1958–1964 (La A)

Cambridge University's Professor of Architecture Andrew Saint (La A 58-64) is one of the authors of St Paul's: The Cathedral Church of London 604-2004 (Yale University Press, £65).

Professor of Architecture, Cambridge University

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SALISBURY, Roy 1940–1986 (Th B, Officer (1946-86), Clerk (1971-86), Governor)

"Belated mention for a publication we missed in 1985. Beazley and Oxford edited by Donna Kurtz (Oxford University Committee for Archaeology Monograph 10) marked the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Sir John Beazley (11's, CA 1898-1903), Professor of Classical Archaeology and the man who revolutionised the study of Greek vase painting. It records the verdict of T E Lawrence: 'Beazley is a very wonderful fellow, who has written almost the best poems that ever came out of Oxford- If it hadn't been for that accursed Greek art, he'd have been a very fine poet.' He was a close friend of the poet James Elroy Flecker, brother of H L O Flecker (Headmaster 30-55). Among those thanked for helping to compile the book or mark the centenary are Peter Attenborough (MB 48-57, Almoner), Sir John Forsdyke (CH 1895-1902), Jasper Griffin (PA 48-56) and Roy Salisbury (TB 40-46, Officer 46-86, Clerk 71-86, Governor).

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SALMON, Philip 1969–1975 (Col B)

Tenor

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SALVAGE, Gavin 1994–2001 (Th B, Mid B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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Sanford-Francis (neé TUCKER), Sara 1971–1976 (2's)

Where are they now FOUND: Was in 2's 1971-1976 and lived in London in 1993. Was being traced by Shirley Ball (neé Peach)

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SAREL, Nicholas 1970–1974 (Col B)

Where are they now FOUND: Being traced by Richard Wade, Ma A 1967-1970, Pe B 1970-1974

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SCARR, Benjamin 1995–2002 (Th B, Mid A, Gr W)

Details on Big Grecian website

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SCHMIDT, Michael 1965–1966 (Th B)

Poet, novelist, scholar & publisher

Congratulations to Michael Schmidt (Th B 65-66) who received an OBE for services to higher education and to poetry in the Queen's Birthday Honours list 2006.

Editor of New Poetries III: An anthology (Carcanet, £9.95) is Michael Schmidt (Th B 65-66).

Latest book by Michael Schmidt (Th B 65-66) is The Story of Poetry: English Poets and Poetry from Caedmon to Caxton (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £25). This is the first of four projected volumes, which will add up to the most comprehensive history of English poetry as well as a new anthology of it. Times reviewer Robert Nye (14 March) commended both book and author: 'The story of English poetry would be the less without him.'

Michael Schmidt's own personal website.

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SCHOLEFIELD, James (CH 1800s)

Priest & classicist

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SCOTT, Jonathan 1959–1968 (Col A)

Big Cat Diary: Cheetah (HarperCollins, £16.99) by Jonathan Scott (Col A 59-68) and his wife Angie is the third book the Scotts have written on an individual African species in connection with their BBC television series.

Wildlife artist, photographer & broadcaster

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SCOTT, Sir Robert Forsyth 1877–1879 (Newgate Street Staff)

Mathematician & antiquary. Vice-Chancellor, Cambridge University

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SEAMAN, C M E 'George' 1920–1927 (Th A, Ba B, Headmaster (1955-70), Governor)

Belated mention for a book published in 1998 for the sixtieth-birthday retrospective exhibition of painter Benedict Rubbra (Col A 49-56, Horsham Art Staff 60s). Benedict Rubbra: Paintings 1958-98: Ideas and Influences (Edizioni Electa, £9.95) has eighty-nine illustrations, many in colour. Its text amounts to a short autobiography, complete with CH material, notably a loving account of Nell Todd (Horsham Staff 50-69), inspiring and eccentric Head of Art. Rubbra found her impossible to paint: 'Miss Todd only looks herself when she puts on her hundred and one facial expressions and when I tell her to keep still, it looks nothing like her.' At her instigation Rubbra painted the Hon David Herbert (Horsham Staff 55-61) who went into publishing and commissioned two books from Rubbra; Herbert's widow Brenda edited the present one. A later and grander portrait commission involved Sir Colin Davis (Th B 38-44). (Rubbra also did a posthumous portrait of George Seaman (Th A, Ba B 20-27, Headmaster 55-70, Governor), never yet reproduced in The Blue.)

One of the huge cast of The Dons by Noel Annan (HarperCollins, £7.99) is A L Smith (CH 1857-69, Almoner). Son of an unsuccessful civil engineer, and one of a family of nineteen surviving children, he found it hard to make ends meet as a young don in the 1880s but rose to be Master of Balliol College, Oxford, which under his leadership became well known for its concern with working-class education and poverty. His son became Rector of the Edinburgh Academy, where his successor was C M E Seaman (Th A, Ba B 20-27, Headmaster 55-70).

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SEATON, Viscount 1785–1789 (John Colborne, CH)

Field Marshal

Portrait

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SELL, Philip J 1967–1974 (Pe A)

Surgeon - previous link to Queen's Medical Centre Nottingham is now broken.

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SELLS, Robert 1948–1955 (Th A)

Surgeon and medical ethicist

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SELLWOOD, Percy Hickson 1890–1896 (Wd 8)

Jeweller, numismatist, Newbury archivist

Report on the Transfer of P H Sellwood Trust

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SERGENT, Noel (Horsham Staff (Hall Warden) 1940s)

Mentioned in 'Christ's Hospital: The War Years'

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SETHI, Selina 1995–2002 (LH A, Gr E)

Details on Big Grecian website

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SETTERFIELD, Graham 1957–1964 (Mid B)

Water policy specialist

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SHACKLETON, HELEN (Staff, Unknown years)

Patricia Menon (Mitchell, 2's 54-61) has taught English at Niagara College and Brock University, Ontario, Canada,and has now had a volume of literary criticism published: Austen, Eliot, Charlotte Bronte and the Mentor-Lover (Palgrave Macmillan ?45). Three teachers at CH Hertford - Frances Mercer, Helen Shackleton and Audrey Cleobury Sunderland - are gratefully included in the acknowledgements.

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SHARP, Sarah 1973–1979 (8's)

Solicitor

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SHARPLES, Matt 1995–1997 (Pe A)

Information

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SHAW, Anthony 1934–1941 (Pe A)

Naval airman

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SHAW, John the Elder and John the Younger 1800–1899 (Architects to CH, 19th century)

Architects to CH

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SHEEHAN, Baz 1978–1986 (Ba A)

Quantity surveyor turned headhunter

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SHEEN, Colin 1955–1962 (Ma A)

Musician, composer, orchestral contractor

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SHELDON-WILLIAMS, Peter 1929–1935 (Ba B)

Artist - used the name "A Oscar"

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SHELLEY, George 1677–1682 (OB, CH Writing Master 1714-?34)

Calligrapher & script designer

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SHEPHERD, William 1957–1964 (Peter Etherden, Ba A)

Economist, author and publisher

About the author

His letter to the Hutton Inquiry

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SHEPPARD, Julian 1939–1947 (Mid A)

Reprinted from the 1966 original, Ximenes on the Art of the Crossword (Swallowtail Books, £7.95) now has a foreword by Colin Dexter. Ximenes was the nom de plume of Derrick Macnutt (Horsham Staff 28-63), and his book, recommended by Tim Moorey in The Week, gives an enlightening conducted tour through the process of composing a crossword and sets out the principles of sound and fair clueing, as followed today by most setters. Julian Sheppard (Mid A 39-47) who sent this item says he's not sure 'sound and fair' was the phrase that came to mind when Macnutt set him homework in the Forties.

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SHEPPARD-BURGESS, Andrew 1994–2001 (La B, Mid B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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SHEPPARD-BURGESS, David 1992–1999 (Mid B)

Economics student, Edinburgh University

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SHEPPARD-BURGESS, Jonny 1994–2001 (La B, Mid B, Gr W)

Details on Grecians 2001 website

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SHIELLS, George 1939–1945 (Th A)

Biography taken from www.georgeshiells.co.uk

Brookmans Park resident George Shiells passed away on Thursday February 15, aged 78 after a short illness. He leaves wife, Lyn, four children, Susan, Graeme, Manda, Philippa and twelve grandchildren. Mr Shiells was well-known throughout the area and will be remembered for his outstanding contributions to the community.

George Shiells was born in East St Pancras, London on April 12, 1928. He won a scholarship to Christ’s Hospital (The Bluecoat School) where he developed a life-long love of music and sport, particularly rugby, cricket, squash and golf.

He met his wife, Lyn in 1949 at a Halloween dance she had organised and the couple were married in 1952. They lived in Brookmans Park for more than forty years.

Following national service in the Marines, he began his career as an articled clerk, becoming a practicing accountant in 1948 and joining John Dale Ltd as an accountant in 1951. After gaining further experience as a management consultant he joined the Enfield-based family firm of Reeves & Sons, a well known name for art and craft materials. This was the company’s first non-family senior appointment. Upon promotion to Group Managing Director, he transformed the company from a UK based operation to an international operation.

In 1971 George Shiells became an early pioneer of free newspapers by starting his own business to publish the Enfield Advertiser. He played a significant part in the development and success of this new industry, holding senior posts on all the major bodies governing the industry including a period as Chairman of the Association of Free Newspapers. He grew the business significantly, launching new editions before selling the business to a division of United Newspapers in 1985, remaining as Chairman until 1989. He continued to act as a consultant to United Newspapers until his retirement in 1993.

Although he enjoyed a very successful business career, it was his considerable involvement with the local community that George Shiells will be remembered for most. He firmly believed in putting something back into the community. During his career he worked closely with many local organisations having been a committee member of Trent Park Preservation Committee, president of Enfield Rotary Club, chairman of governors at Middlesex University, foundation governor at Enfield Grammar School and vice chairman of Enfield College of Technology.

He was passionate about the success of the business community in Enfield and also served as a committee member of Enfield Enterprise Agency, as president of the Enfield District Manufacturers Association and secretary of the Enfield Chamber of Trade. He took great pride in his involvement as a director and trustee in the creation of MoDA, the Museum of Domestic Design and Architecture.

Throughout his retirement, George Shiells continued his involvement with local organisations, none more so than Chancellor’s School in Brookmans Park. His long association with the school began in 1964 when his eldest daughter was in the first intake of pupils. He subsequently became the first parent Chairman of the PTA, the first parent observer to the Governing Body and the first ex-parent Governor. In 1979/80 he led a campaign to save the school from closure.

In 1981, he had the idea to start Chancellors Community Newsletter, a professionally-produced newsletter distributed free to around 6000 homes. He continued to support the school, appearing in PTA productions and assisting with the organisation of numerous events.

George Shiells was a man who loved life. Ever the congenial host, he appreciated excellent food and wine although he would admit that his own best culinary skills amounted to toast and marmalade, kippers and heating beans. His broad musical tastes ranged from the Rolling Stones to Gilbert and Sullivan and he had a love of theatre, performing too, whenever the opportunity arose.

He relaxed by reading, completing crosswords and simply watching the birds bathing in his garden. He also enjoyed spending time at his house in France. As a sportsman he played golf at Brookmans Park Golf Club.

George Shiells leaves us with many lasting memories and legacies of his life and work. An astute businessman, a popular employer, a devoted family man, sportsman, entertainer, organiser and fearless campaigner.

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SHIPPEN, John 1966–2004 (Horsham Staff)

His CH Scouts photo gallery:

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SHIRLEY, George 1861–1868 (CH)

Fertiliser manufacturer in Australia

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SHOLANKE, Folake Florence 1994–2001 (LH A, Gr E)

Law student, Westminster University

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SILK, Anne 1943–1947 (Arnold, 4's)

Anne Silk (Arnold, 4's 43-47) is co-author with David Cowan of Ancient Energies of the Earth: A Groundbreaking Exploration of the Earth's Natural Energy and How It Affects Our Health (Thorsons, £9.99) which 'traces the energy patterns that resonate from the ley lines, standing stones and circles of Great Britain.' Anne Silk 'is widely respected in the scientific world and has received numerous awards for her research work' and has been researching the connection between human health and the electromagnetic fields of the Earth. It will be remembered that in 1987 she became the first CHOG to propose the Housey Toast at Founder's Day Din